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New grad pay and schedules at a SNF?

Posted

Hello everyone. I may have an interview coming up and would like to go in with an idea of what is considered normal. I have so many questions and am not very familiar with how SNFs work. I have looked through many threads but have not found the answers.

I'm wondering how much a new grad should expect to make at a SNF? Also, what type of schedule would be typical? Is it generally a 12 hour shift? How many patients would you normally be responsible for, and if it is very many then how many times do you actually see each of them in a shift? Do most SNF have LPNs to do meds, or is that usually all on the RN?

If you have to stay over because the next shift will be 4 hours late for example, is that time and a half? How do you complete your documentation if it isn't complete because you didn't have a chance during your shift. I ask because I have read on AN that legally you can't work unless you are being paid, but that companies don't want to pay you OT. It's all so confusing :nailbiting:.

Thank you for any info :)

sorry, could you clarify what SNF stands for?

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

SNF = Skilled Nursing Facility...something like a nursing home or rehab center. You may have elderly clients along with younger clients who are disabled and cannot take care of themselves and need nurse care in a facility.

ah, okay, sorry I thought you were talking about the name of a facility. I didn't know the acronym.

JWEMT

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 2 years experience.

I have never worked in SNF as a RN but as a LPN but I believe that the salary is 30-35/per hour. May be high maybe lower. As a new grad I personally feel bare minimum should be 33 per hour.

SNF is usually 7.5 hour shifts. duties include medication, care plans, treatments, whatever else patient needs. In addition RNs have to do MDS. Most SNF have LPNS do meds but somethings RN are assigned to it to. depending on the facility. PAtients depending on acuity could be from 15-60 patients. Usually they don't pay for you to finish work you are expected to do. There's always a conflict between shifts due to this. (Having to wait for the other shift to come before you leave)

Thank you.

Would it be about the same for a nursing home as far as pay goes?

I'm hoping for a hospital but whichever offer I get will have to be the offer I take.

JWEMT

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 2 years experience.

Snf is the same as nursing home essentially

Yes it seems the terms are used interchangeably but I was asking again according to the description given above by someone which sounds more short term/ maybe more sub acute whch was what I meant when I originally asked.

Some facilities it looks like have an RN per unit or hall as I think it may be called in some places. Some have only one RN and care is performed by LPN and CNA.

Should I differentiate by Long term, sub-acute, rehab to get a better idea of pay expectations?

I kind of assume it would all be about the same but maybe I'm wrong.

I'm new and may just be making it more confusing than it is. I just want to know what to expect.

JWEMT

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 2 years experience.

Pay is the same across all 3 this Is because facilities with just Ltc is not maintainabkr. So all ltc pretty much starting rehab. It's pretty much devided hospital pay vs snf pay. Not hospital vs ltc vs subacute vs rehab

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

Pay across all SNF departments is the same...same was with hospital, does not matter if you work in outpatient wellness clinic or in ICU, everyone gets the same pay. SNFs are usually 8 hour shifts: 7a-3p, 3p-11p, 11p-7a and they all have an extra half hour at end of each shift in which you finish up work and give report to the incoming shift. In SNF, it is usually one or two RNs per shift, with more LPNs and more CNAs. SNF pay is lower than hospital...maybe in the high 50s (salary per year).

I found that "high 50s" salary shocking for a SNF-LTC in NYC. I am soon to start in such a facility in NYC and the offer was $77,000+ as a new grad with no prior experience. In addition, it is a days shift position. This was actually a little over $1000 more than that of New York Methodist's offer for a day shift new grad position. Possibly it depends which SNF-LTC facility?

Nynurs,

Was that in the city or one of the outer boroughs? That does make a SNF more appealing considering the negative things I hear and read.

the SNF-LTC facility is in Brooklyn, and yes!! definitely more appealing that what I've read too. if you've explored other threads, you'll read that it is considerable hard work at these facilities also, especially with the patient/nurse ratio. for a new grad in NYC, this opportunity and offer was a blessing.

I have read some of those threads, they do make it sound tough.

Good luck, I hope it turns out to be a great job.

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

SNF pay is higher if snf is part of a hospital ...and so pay is equivalent to all other RNs starting working at that hospital. If snf is independent then pay is lower.

nycNurse2b

Specializes in Currently: Certified School Nurse.

I started in a SNF on the sub-acute rehab floor when I graduated a few years ago. I think I started at just over $70k a year for days. This was in an outer borough.

gl!

these salaries seem kind of high. I am looking for a job thru an agency and they told me I'll only get $25 an hour as a new grad, $30 at the most. Where did you find these nursing homes. I have an associates in nursing and bachelors in another field, so maybe thats why I can't find something in a nursing home?