New grad nurses- what did you do to get hired?

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Double-Helix, BSN, RN

1 Article; 3,377 Posts

Specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU. Has 12 years experience.

1. I made sure I had an excellent professional resume. I had my sister, who is a manager for a large corporation, and a friend, who is a nurse recruiter, review my resume and make suggestions. I also had my resume and cover letter reviewed by two instructors and our career services director at my university. Highlight your strengths and certifications. When I received an interview, the recruiter commented on how impressed she was with my resume and how rarely they see professional documents.

2. I applied early and often. I moved to a different state right after graduation, but I still started applying for jobs in March (I graduated the following May). I must have applied to a hundred different positions, but patience and persistance is key.

3. I had letters of recommendation from faculty. They key here is the right faculty. If you are applying for a Pediatrics job (I was), don't bring a letter from your Med-Surg faculty member, bring a letter from your Pediatrics clinical instructor. The interviewer is most interested in how you perform in the area to which you are applying. Make sure they are good, specific letters, but just generic ones. Also bring copies of your transcript from school.

4. Keep checking regularly for new positions and apply again. The job I was eventually hired for was posted on the hospital website for only two or three days. Some hospitals are doing this to avoid a huge number of applicants to sort through.

5. If you are connected to a hospital in any way- friends, family, instructors, etc, use that connection. Ask if your connection would be willing to give you a reference or put in a good work for you.

6. Dress professionally for the interview, arrive on time, bring extra copies of all your documents, and practice specific questions. Research the facility beforehand and have a list of questions to ask the interviewer. Send a thank you note.

Keep being persistant. There are jobs out there for new grads, you just have to find them.

Aleirax

4 Posts

Connections! After spending months emailing, calling, sending resumes, going in person and hearing NOTHING, I called up every nurse, doctor, medical professional I know, or sort of know and just begged, asked, pleaded if they could give in my resume. Extremely humbling experience. I was looking in NYC and then branched out, got my license in Jersey, finally got my first and last interview, after a doc (relative by marriage) handed in my resume for me at this small community hospital in LI. I was willing to move though, I was looking for 8 mths and it was the worst!

Friends of mine have started working in St. Peter's in Albany. I've heard that they call you they day after you apply.

Good Luck!!!!

Kristen75

41 Posts

Aleirax,

I just moved to the LI area. I am a new grad and was wondering where you were working. If you can PM, I would be interested in talking to you to network and get some advice for the area.

Thanks...

nycnurse18

36 Posts

Aleirax,

I just moved to the LI area. I am a new grad and was wondering where you were working. If you can PM, I would be interested in talking to you to network and get some advice for the area.

Thanks...

Could you pm me also! I'm in the nyc area but looking for work and am starting to look in LI, thanks!

ilove

184 Posts

is it impossible to get a job after being fired? and if your a new international graduated new grad who can u put as ur references

Double-Helix, BSN, RN

1 Article; 3,377 Posts

Specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU. Has 12 years experience.
is it impossible to get a job after being fired? and if your a new international graduated new grad who can u put as ur references

Its not impossible to get a job after being fired. But you will have to explain why you were fired and, depending on the reason, it might hurt your chances. Like if you were fired for being late a lot vs laid off due to cut backs.

For references, list previous employers, teachers, clinical instructors even if they are international. You might want to have several signed letters of recommendation from these people to save your employer the hassle of international calls.

laramfm

2 Posts

I graduated last December, got licensed this Feb., got a job offer this week.

I handed my application or resume into the person in charge of doing the hiring in PERSON! I never let them take it and leave it for them to read later. Even if it meant I had to return to the place several times. I also a 30 second spiel to say about why I wanted to work there that showed my enthusiasm and personality.

Yup.... that's how I did it. I filled out almost 100 online applications, not one interview. About half the places I walked into in person gave me interviews and after a few weeks I had a job offer.

Isis, Im getting ready to go anywhere and everywhere i can this coming week. which places did you go to? I feel like i dont wanna make anyone mad if I show up to a hospital HR and talk to someone when they are so busy.. I know that is the best way to do in SNF and LTC. Im not sure a hospital will be too happy with me if I show up there... what do you think?

swtpea48

61 Posts

I had to use a contact I made during my second semester in clinical. My instructor told me to call her as soon as I graduated and she would help me get an interview. She did and I start my new job in a week and a half.

dudette10, MSN, RN

1 Article; 3,530 Posts

Specializes in Med/Surg, Academics. Has 12 years experience.

During school, I networked a lot, I volunteered a lot, and I held a student leadership position. The volunteering and leadership was on my resume, along with my scholarship and academic awards. I built my resume carefully, making sure to include transferable skills from my previous career. A counselor at school reviewed it and gave me tips on improving it.

My first two interviews were the result of networking. I got job offers from both of them. I also received three other opportunities to interview from places I had no inside contacts--including two facilities that are part of a large, well-known university system--and had just applied online.

After the first two job offers, I would have said it was just networking. Now, I know it might also be a solid resume and cover letter, at least in my area (Chicago).

sarahjuly

22 Posts

Honestly It may be to late to do what I did. When I was in school I knew getting a job when I graduated may be challenging. So at every clinical I worked really really hard to stand out at the hospital. I took the time to get to know the managers and who I needed to impress. I know it sounds a little manipultive, but hey you have got to do what you got to do.

You may need to do some networking

Could you apply at any of the hospitals you had clinicals at? or contact a clinical instructer for advice?

Also prior to an interview research the hospital find out what they are trying to improve.

The one i'm working is trying to work on costumer satisfaction.. so i worked my resume and my answers to that. Also I figured out what I liked about the hospital before I went in. They want a nurse that we'll be a good fit an and happy in their.

sarahjuly

22 Posts

oh sorry forgot one more thing.. after I got my job a manager gave me advice. She said if you know you really really want to work on a unit find out who their manager is. Send them a resume and cover letter. If they want you or are understaffed. They may push to hire you. Sometimes the hospital in an attempt ot save money well tell a unit that their are no good applicants.