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i need some info on moving to NJ and nsg in NJ pls

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I ill like some info on nsg in NJ cos i'll like to move with my DH and two sons but i dont know wot to do cos in Ga things are bad and i really will like to go to a place where there is so many opportunities and also for my sons future.

My concern now is will i get a good job in NJ?how much can NJ offer me per hr as an RN with4yrs of experience?Will my husband be able to get a job as a social worker?I have so many consideration but i want to know the best option for me.Do i stake in south with no union where anything goes or do i have to move up north to have a better life.Somebody help me pls

coppertopRN

Specializes in IR, travel, agency, M/S, tele. Has 7 years experience.

As a transplant myself I will say only one thing...if you don't HAVE to move to New Jersey, DON'T. It is not a nice culture change for someone from the South or the Midwest. Its taken me almost 7 years to get used to it and most of that has taken place in the past year. I don't want to go into too much detail but I was terribly unhappy.

Also, yes, salaries are higher but so are work expectations and other living expenses. For example, housing is OUTRAGEOUS, my auto insurance quadrupled and some food (cheese and deli items for example) are very high. Property and other taxes are very high, too. Gasoline and liquor are much cheaper (go figure!). Public schools are better than most areas of the country but just about everything has an almost malignant sense of competition to it. If I knew then what I know now, we wouldn't have moved.

I am a new grad in NJ, and am very worried about finding a job once I get my license. I say that as the valedictorian of my nursing school, president of the Student Nurses Association, and loads of awards and honors.

The sad truth of the matter is that about 9 hospitals in NJ have closed over the last couple of years, and all of the positions that would have gone to new grads have been taken by displaced nurses.

That also means that even very experienced nurses are having trouble finding jobs in NJ, because there is SO much competition for every open position. I wanted to go into ICU, but now may have to stay in my current profession, because NO ONE IS HIRING right now.

All this said, DO NOT MOVE TO NJ IF YOU DO NOT HAVE TO. Even social workers have trouble finding work in NJ, because that is a very saturated field in NJ. Everything here is extremely expensive and if you do not have jobs secured before you move, DON'T MOVE. You will drain any savings you might have, and will probably end up with an ulcer...

Good luck in your job search!

coppertopRN

Specializes in IR, travel, agency, M/S, tele. Has 7 years experience.

If you insist on nursing out of Georgia, I suggest you deal with a national recruiter. They will hook you up with interviews, moving expenses, sign-on bonuses and all of the perks. Many of them will also handle other professions and might be able to market you and your husband as a "package". Again, I would encourage you to really look into other locales besides NJ.

As a matter of fact, I've been in over 50 hospitals with traveling and agency work. By far the best hospital I EVER worked in was Lancaster General in Lancaster, PA. If you really want to move North, see if they are hiring. I'd go back in a heartbeat but its just not in the cards right now.

meluhn

Specializes in acute rehab, med surg, LTC, peds, home c. Has 16 years experience.

As a transplant myself I will say only one thing...if you don't HAVE to move to New Jersey, DON'T. It is not a nice culture change for someone from the South or the Midwest. Its taken me almost 7 years to get used to it and most of that has taken place in the past year. I don't want to go into too much detail but I was terribly unhappy.

Also, yes, salaries are higher but so are work expectations and other living expenses. For example, housing is OUTRAGEOUS, my auto insurance quadrupled and some food (cheese and deli items for example) are very high. Property and other taxes are very high, too. Gasoline and liquor are much cheaper (go figure!). Public schools are better than most areas of the country but just about everything has an almost malignant sense of competition to it. If I knew then what I know now, we wouldn't have moved.

As a life time NJ resident I found your insight both interesting and slightly harsh. As far as the cost of living and property taxes, you are absolutely right. If my husband didn't have a good job, I would definitely be struggling on my RN salary alone.

I think the sense of competition you are referring to is what I really appreciate about NJ when I visit other states. For example, customer service is so much better here than anywhere else I go. I just spent the weekend in PA at a major hotel chain. The place had run out of coffee for the continental breakfast at 7:30 am, ran out of pool towels, wash cloths and extra towels. What the h#ll is that about? It is really inexcusable. If this is what you mean by higher work expectations than yes, we do have that. Thank God.

I was happy to see that PA had a multitude of diners to choose from, (as a jersey girl I am quite the diner connosieur). I was, however, appalled by the sorry excuse for a Greek salad that was served to me. This sort of thing would never fly in NJ. The competition is, in my opinion, the product of alot of educated and talented people all competing for a limited number of resources/jobs/whatever. It is not enough in NJ to just have an education because many people have one.

As far as the culture, it is a much faster place than any other state I have visited but that is what I love about it. This might have something to do with being close to 2 major metro areas, NY and Philly. When I go to other states and see people lolligagging around, it kind of drives me crazy. I want to scream, "C'mon people, look alive". JK, but really, I get kind of a restless feeling when I try to go at their pace, like I should hurry up.

To the OP: Right now the job market is tough here too. It is even hard to get an RN position in a hospital. Home health and LTC are still hiring but even they are able to pick and choose who they hire as opposed to in the past where they would literally hire anyone. Unless your SO has a marketable skill to supplement your income, do not think it will be easy in NJ even if you get a job. In my area, it would cost about 1800/month just to rent a 2 br condo. About 1000/month for an apartment. Houses go for anywhere from 250K and up. Generally speaking it gets cheaper the farther south you go, but trust me, you dont want to go too far south. I love it here and although I might change a few things, I haven't found a place I like better. Good luck making your decision.\

PS. We dont pump our own gas!!

Thanks so much for your advice.I was thinking that it's better up there.As the saying goes,grass is always greener on the other side.I have a good home,life, job just that

1.The schools here are not giving me good credit to do my RN-BSN.

2.Tuition reimbursement and so many benefit was cut off from my hospital.

3.DH lost his job and couldnt get to get another yet.

4.I want a better environs than Ga for my children.and few more reasons.I'm just a woman that prays and wants the best for my family and willing to go extra to get it by Gods grace.In everything,i am trusting God.Azor

coppertopRN

Specializes in IR, travel, agency, M/S, tele. Has 7 years experience.

Hi, While I can sympathize with your feeling that I was harsh, I can sympathize with this out-of-state potential neighbor. NJ's culture is very foreign. Faster, yes. But also much more rude and much more unforgiving. It has been my unfortunate experience to encounter that most NJ residents are very quick to disdain or dislike (loudly) that which they don't understand or are unfamiliar with. Of course, this is not universal. I've met a few wonderful people but I've met a lot more that would stab me in the back while smiling and asking about my kids. Sorry, but that has been my experience. Those of us from the South and the Midwest tend to be very open and trusting when compared to NY and NJ folks. As a native, you wouldn't see the differences. That is nothing against you. Its just harder to see cultural nuances like this when they are your own.

PS I haven't found a diner yet that I would go to twice! Ugh...Yuck!

meluhn

Specializes in acute rehab, med surg, LTC, peds, home c. Has 16 years experience.

Hi, While I can sympathize with your feeling that I was harsh, I can sympathize with this out-of-state potential neighbor. NJ's culture is very foreign. Faster, yes. But also much more rude and much more unforgiving.

I think what people mistake for rudeness is really just a "mind your own business" mentality that comes from living in a populated area. It is true, with 1000 people per square mile, we don't have time to make small talk with everyone. In NY if you go around saying HI to strangers, it is viewed as wierd or even threatening, unless they are people you deal with on a daily basis like at the corner grocery store. Otherwise, the sheer number of people prohibits that sort of thing.

It has been my unfortunate experience to encounter that most NJ residents are very quick to disdain or dislike (loudly) that which they don't understand or are unfamiliar with. I could say the same about someone from rural Kansas or the Ozark Mountains. Im sure they would have something to say if they experienced something unfamiliar.

Of course, this is not universal. I've met a few wonderful people but I've met a lot more that would stab me in the back while smiling and asking about my kids. Sorry, but that has been my experience.

I hear people all over this board talk about the backstabbing and gossip at work, I dont think it is especially bad in NJ. I have always worked here, never had a problem. If you dont entertain that nonsense, it will go away.

Those of us from the South and the Midwest tend to be very open and trusting when compared to NY and NJ folks. Perhaps more trusting because you live in smaller communities. I dont know about open. The people that I know from the south and midwest are religious fanatics that are far from "open". These areas are notoriously religious and not open minded as far as I have seen. What some see as having old fashioned values, others see as being closed minded.

As a native, you wouldn't see the differences. That is nothing against you. Its just harder to see cultural nuances like this when they are your own. I still think we are misunderstood. If it is so bad here, why are we the most populated state in the country? Everyone puts us down but yet they all want to live here.

PS I haven't found a diner yet that I would go to twice! Ugh...Yuck!

I am wondering what part of the state you live in that you had such a bad experience. There is a huge difference between say Bergen County and Cape May.

DINER FOOD ROCKS!!

coppertopRN

Specializes in IR, travel, agency, M/S, tele. Has 7 years experience.

I've worked and traveled extensively all over the state. I find my observations about the culture most sharply the farther East and North that I get. The farther South and the farther West, the better.

As far as why is NJ so populated? Well... First, natives seldom leave without provocation. Second, many (like me) got stranded here by employers who paid us to come. By the way, did you ever notice that you have to pay on the toll bridges to get OUT but it's free to get IN? Hmmm...

Your assertion that talking to strangers or being friendly is seen as weird or threatening while stereotyping Southerers or Midwesterners as religious fanatics just confirms my opinions. I'm sorry, tight population or not...there are never too many people around to smile and say "Hi".

As far as diner food. If I wanted to eat from packaged mixes, dehydrated mashed potatos, canned vegetables and gloppy cream soups I would eat the hospital food at work. No thanks. Give me fresh veggies with some crunch and from gravy from scratch ANY day!

This forum is not the place to debate these type of issues. We will not change each other's opinions. You are a native and will always love home the best. That is commendable and in some ways I envy you. But the bottom line is that I wouldn't recommend this as a move for someone unfamiliar with this culture. It is a guarantee for unhappiness and regret.

amarilla, RN

Specializes in MS, ED. Has 2 years experience.

Another transplant here...

I originally moved here to work in Finance, (New York, the only place for it!), and have stayed for 11 years. From the time I've arrived, I've plotted how to make enough, save enough and establish my career appropriately to be able to move away while still being 'ahead'. Though I've adjusted to the area through the years, I can't see making this my home.

Like most, I moved here hoping for steady work, career advancement, and more money than I could ever make in a small town down south. I found that, though times out of work were rough, the cost of living initially crippling, and the quality of life - between rude folks, endless traffic, tax increases, strange weather, you name it - lacking. It's a tough row to hoe, really. With the opportunity that many of us see - jobs, more money, better schools (supposedly) - comes the price: a certain feeling of displacement and loneliness that doesn't easily fade. :twocents:

Beyond that, know that if folks hear a southern accent when you open your mouth, somehow your IQ drops 30 points and they tend to treat you accordingly, (JME).

A few thoughts: a move to *any* unfamiliar area is a big decision. Have you ever visited this area or know anyone who lives here? Perhaps a visit to explore could give you a sense of whether a move might be a good idea?

That being said: from my experience, finding employment here can mean months of applications, interviews and inquiries. Hospitals have been closing, others on hiring freezes; can't say things are much better in other industries from the number of people I know out of work. Without a solid written offer already in place, I'm not sure I'd chance eating up my savings to move and risk months out of work.

Rent for a family in central and northern NJ is very high; buying a home is likely worse for what you get for the money. Have you looked up houses on MLS or apartments on nj.com? You might be in for a shock, unfortunately. I sure was.

I agree that there is opportunity here; I certainly thought so when I moved. Having said that, I wouldn't do it again. There are other smaller markets experiencing job growth, (with more moderate cost of living and promising schools), that I would try before hedging my bets to make it here, considering the trade off.

Good luck,

Southern

Southernurse

Specializes in cardiac, ortho, med-surg. Has 6 years experience.

PS. We dont pump our own gas!!

I moved up North from the South recently (6/8) and the attendant freaked out when he heard my truck door open and flew over to me as if I were a criminal! I had to literally tell myself out loud and chant "DO NOT GET OUT OF THE CAR" when I stopped for gas after that!:D

Southernurse

Specializes in cardiac, ortho, med-surg. Has 6 years experience.

Hi, While I can sympathize with your feeling that I was harsh, I can sympathize with this out-of-state potential neighbor. NJ's culture is very foreign. Faster, yes. But also much more rude and much more unforgiving. It has been my unfortunate experience to encounter that most NJ residents are very quick to disdain or dislike (loudly) that which they don't understand or are unfamiliar with. Of course, this is not universal. I've met a few wonderful people but I've met a lot more that would stab me in the back while smiling and asking about my kids. Sorry, but that has been my experience. Those of us from the South and the Midwest tend to be very open and trusting when compared to NY and NJ folks. As a native, you wouldn't see the differences. That is nothing against you. Its just harder to see cultural nuances like this when they are your own.

PS I haven't found a diner yet that I would go to twice! Ugh...Yuck!

I was made in the South, but my birth defect was being born in NJ. I moved to the South as soon as possible, and thought I left Jersey behind. I wanted to leave for all of the reasons you listed, and was never going to look back. Of course, we are back after 13 years because my husband got a job offer he couldn't refuse. I still have my Tennesee tag on my truck, and my rebel flag tag in the front. I refuse to conform to the pace and culture. We got just as much done in the South without mowing each other down. NJ has changed so much since we were here, and I feel like we are in a netherworld. I work for a home health company that has offices in the South and in NJ, so getting a job was not an issue, but the way of life is an issue. My children seem to have forgotten their Southern manners. They used to say "Yes, Sir," and "Yes, Ma'am" and they were different people. The adjustment has been difficult, but I have to show them that we can retain our culture just as well as any other foreigner coming to the area. I am not ashamed of where I came from. Nursing has actually helped in the transition because I go into "emotional distance" mode and maintain who I am and who my family is in spite of what goes on around us. My husband and I are in a unique position to already be familiar with the area but not truly a part of it. I count the days until I can go home, but believe me, Southerners sticking to their guns can get along just fine here. Stay true to your values and upbringing. Let the rest of them rush around and chase their tails. Sorry so chatty, but these thoughts were coming quickly! As for the rest of my fellow transplants: remember to the Northerners we are dangerous...we are Southerners with an education!:lol2:

I no longer live in NJ; therefore, I don't work there, but.......DON'T do it. I was born and raised there, just moved out 1 year ago due to ignorant ppl and the outrageous cost of everything!!! People look at you straight in the face and turn their head, not one hello. Very famous for shutting doors in you face also, even if you are 1-2 steps behind them. The middle finger is used often, I will not go on. DON'T move to NJ, you will regret it!!

I have friends working in Central NJ hospitals and they HATE it. Nursing/pt ratio is terrible. They are constantly looking for new jobs.

Needless to say, my husband and I are living off of my Virginia nursing salary. If this was NJ, no way it would happen. We would have lost our house, car, pets, etc.....

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