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2nd degree BSN worth it?

Does already having another Bachelor's degree have any greater weight on being accepted versus students who do not have another degree? All of this is new to me and I am trying to figure out what makes more sense before applying to a Nursing school.

Thanks for any advice! :-)

From my experience having a bachelor's degree will usually earn you a few extra points when you're applying to a nursing program that uses a point system. There are also nursing programs designed specifically for students that have already earned a bachelor's degree in another field. Do a little research in the schools in your area for more details.

Edited by chuleta
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This is my take on it.

You have zero nursing degrees.

Previous Bachelor's can offer you advantage of accelerated BSN route if previous Bachelor's degree has stellar GPA. If not so good GPA, you can have advantage of transferring 60-90 credits from previous degree towards traditional BSN degree.

Think of it as multiple degrees, not second degree; independant but accumulated.

Welcome to Allnurses and good luck on your research. :)

I was able to transfer many courses from the previous degree for credit. This speeded up the admissions process.

Thanks Chuleta. If I were to talk to the schools I am interested in, do you think they will disclose their point systems?

Thanks dt70. I will keep that in mind, I did not consider some credits from previous degree work would transfer to the BSN. Always, good to know.

Thanks caliotter3. I agree with you and dt70, being able to transfer courses for degree credit is one of the pro's of holding a previous degree.

People just keep telling me to just transfer to a school that offers a BSN and just go from there but, I keep thinking I am only 30 credits away from getting my Psychology/Sociology degree at my current university. It seems like it would be a waste to just forget about that degree, leave my university, and continue with a BSN instead.

Thanks Chuleta. If I were to talk to the schools I am interested in, do you think they will disclose their point systems?

Most schools post their point system breakdown on their website along with dates of info sessions regarding their nursing program. Attend an info session if possible. Also don't forget all nursing schools require you to fulfill a set of pre-requisites before you can apply! So make sure you've got that covered.

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

Some schools may not accept you if you already have a bachelor's. It's worth doing your research.

You never know when that degree might prove helpful. Of course, you should complete it before transfer. Good luck.

NurseGirl525, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

No, it won't to be honest. You may already have some of the general credits done that may transfer but I have not heard of a school that bases its admissions process on previous degrees. Lots of people have them. If your GPA was good enough, you could do an accelerated BSN based on the fact you have most of the gen ed credits completed. For most schools that have a points system here is what most(not all), go off of:

there are certain prereq classes they look at and assign points based on grade

Teas or Hesi entrance exam score

essay (some)

interview (some)

volunteer experience (some)

you may get an additional point or so for taking prereqs there

Most schools that do a points system are CC so you would be looking at an ASN. Most schools that do a BSN look at cumulative GPA rather than certain prereqs and and entrance exam along with either an essay or interview. So if you go for a BSN but had a crappy GPA from your other degree, chances are you are going to have to do an ASN program that looks at different criteria. Also if your classes are over 7 years old, most schools won't accept those grades and you will have to do them over. But they may still look at your previous GPA.

Your best bet is going to be to look at the different programs you want to get into and find out the requirements. Set up some appointments and speak with nursing advisors.

My bachelor degree satisfied all general education required to gain a BSN degree at a traditional or an accelerated. A bachelor will help you in getting your BSNS a lot faster than traditional. You won't have to start over taking classes you already took. A bachelor degree plus taking your sciences classes and you are good to go.

I would say finish that degree. You are almost done. It is a big advantage for you in the BSN program. Dont transfer. I have a Bachelor of Science in Human Services. It hat diploma from your degree will be a big help as well.

Some schools may not accept you if you already have a bachelor's. It's worth doing your research.

There are a lot of school that accept bachelor degrees. If you try going to a regular traditional BSN yes they will want your classes taken there. But there are many schools who are doing accelerated and and will accept your degree very well.

Some ADNs will too being that your general education is satisfied. Just complete the sciences. But who would want to do an ADNS when they have a bachelor degree already. You get a BSNS in the time or faster.

Call each school and get their requirements. That's the best way to find out.

A key point to consider is that having a bachelors degree and continuing your studies will severely impact access to financial aid. This should factor into your decision as to whether to continue your current degree or switch to a nursing program. What I would suggest is to start taking the basic prerequisite courses for your nursing program (varies by Universities/Community Colleges) while still pursuing your undergraduate degree. Below is a somewhat typical list of prerequisites to enter a BSN program:

[TABLE=width: 100%]

[TR]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=width: 45%]

Prerequisite

General Education Requirements (Must be taken prior to admission to the Nursing Program)

[/TD]

[TD=width: 55%]

Other Requirements

For Graduation (can be taken prior to admission or while in the Nursing Program)

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]Anatomy and Physiology I & II with labs[/TD]

[TD=align: left]Foundations of Global Citizenship (6)[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]Microbiology with lab[/TD]

[TD=align: left]Foundations of Creative Expression (6)[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]College Algebra or Math for Liberal Arts[/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]Statistics[/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]Chemistry with lab[/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]Nutrition[/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]English Composition I & II[/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]6 hours: General Education Humanities[/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]Introduction to Sociology[/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]Introduction to Psychology[/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=align: left]Human Growth & Development through the Life Span[/TD]

[/TR]

[/TABLE]

Once you have completed a bachelors degree, you will be limited to the number and type of financial aid you can get as a second degree candidate. You should stop by your Financial Aid Office to get a better understanding of this issue as you move forward. Also, a large number of Universities are now penalizing students who take more credits than what is typically required to satisfy a normal BS degree (~120 credits) and students have to pay a cost penalty for credits above and beyond a certain number of credits. This is due to a Federal/State push to have students finish their degree as quickly as possible. At any rate, get a first degree and then doing an accelerated program might be your best bet, along with taking the prerequisites while still an undergraduate and eligible for financial aid. Speak to your Academic Advisor (and Financial Aid Advisor) at your current institution to map out your best course of action.

You have to ask yourself if it is worth the cost and time to finish another year pursuing a degree that will have little or no value on your ultimate career goal.

Edited by SoniaReb

iPink, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, Postpartum.

But who would want to do an ADNS when they have a bachelor degree already. You get a BSNS in the time or faster.

For several reasons...Most Accelerated programs require you to have at least a 3.0 GPA to apply. Not everyone earned that when getting their first bachelors. Also ABSNs can be expensive and for some getting an ADN made better sense financially. Then they can do an RN-BSN later. Lastly, ABSNs are rigorous so not working is often encouraged. Many people still need to work while attending school, so the best option for them is to go the ADN route.

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llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

Definitely check into the financial implications of finishing that first Bachelor's before doing so! It may make you ineligible for some forms of financial aid -- which may force you into taking out the worst kinds of loan that will cripple you financially for many years!

My advice is to not finish the 1st degree now ... but focus on getting the degree that will get you the job you want. Then, if you want to, you can finish that first degree one class at a time once you are working as a nurse. If you find that you don't want to invest any more in that first degree after you have your BSN, then you'll be glad you didn't waste time and money on it prior to nursing school.

Don't throw time and money away on a degree you don't plan to use. The opportunity to finish will be there (if you want to) after you are a nurse.

For several reasons...Most Accelerated programs require you to have at least a 3.0 GPA to apply. Not everyone earned that when getting their first bachelors. Also ABSNs can be expensive and for some getting an ADN made better sense financially. Then they can do an RN-BSN later. Lastly, ABSNs are rigorous so not working is often encouraged. Many people still need to work while attending school, so the best option for them is to go the ADN route.

Sent via iPink's phone using allnurses

Understood. Now for ADN we can't even work during ADN here in Southern California. I would be an RN already. I haven't found any ADNs that would allow you to work.

iPink, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, Postpartum.

I know plenty of people that worked during their ADN program.

windsurfer8, BSN

Specializes in Psych/Military Nursing.

I did an ABSN. It is not an advantage because you still have to take the exact same nursing classes as traditional. They feel you can handle 21 hours a semester because people have already proven they are capable students. Usually the minimum GPA on first degree is 3.0. And many are higher than that. It is quicker, but heck you already wasted 4 years getting the first bachelors. So actually "slower" than traditional.

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