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**mentors needed**

Hi Everyone!

I am a pre-nursing student that eventually hopes to be a FNP. I know that student nurses (myself included :) ) have questions that they want answered. Sometimes even researching won't get the answers that nurses who lived through it have. In this thread I hope pre-nursing and nursing students will come and post questions that experienced nurses could answer.

I thought I could start with some questions and hopefully we will get some more questions and answers. No such thing as a dumb question! So ask away!

Since I am just a lowly pre-nursing student, I am clueless on a lot of subjects :) I am curious about the daily activities of a bedside nurse. I am sure it fluctuates from floor to floor but a general run down would be awesome.

What are the traits you think that make a great nurse?

Could anyone fill me in on what care plans are?

Well hopefully this will be the start of a very informative thread. Please post questions!

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

What are care plans??? Yikes, that's kind of hard to put into words. Basically, it's what you are doing for the patient from a nursing standpoint. It needs to be individualized and research or evidenced-based.

For students care plans are tedious and time consuming but a good way to learn how to treat your patient based on your assessment.

I know that doesn't begin to clear it up for you, so hopefully someone will explain it better than I.

The qualities that go into making a good nurse are many, but I would think that empathy is right up there. Putting all judgements aside and taking care of the patient as you would want yourself and your family cared for, actually trying to feel what the patient is feeling.

That and good old common sense.

p.s. Don't call yourself "lowly" we all were there once. :)

sirI, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

Could anyone fill me in on what care plans are?

Well hopefully this will be the start of a very informative thread. Please post questions!

Care Plans: A document which outlines a plan of care for the patient/client. It is created upon admission and continues until discharge or death of the patient.

This plan changes often. Daily, hourly, minute-by-minute..........Others should be able to view a care plan and locate all the information needed to provide the utmost care for the patient/client.

This is but a brief definition and not at all what is involved in the creation of a care plan. Remember, it is individualized for every patient/client.

Go to http://www.careplans.com

http://www.nursesintraining.8m.com and click on Care Plans for a little more info.

wonderbee, BSN, RN

Specializes in critical care; community health; psych.

A great idea that has been addressed by our sponsors at allnurses. See nursing student assistance forum. You should find lots of jewels there.

O.K., from a "pre-nursing" student a lot of questions come to mind. Here are just a few that I have. :rolleyes:

Are nursing drug calculations hard?

Do you always remember EVERY part of the anatomy?

Do you have a "most embarrassing moment" to share?

Do you ever just want to give up?

What keeps you inspired to move on to the next level?

Thanks,

Cindy

Thanks for asking questions Cindy! Hopefully an experienced nurse can answer them for us. :)

a good nurse - someone who realizes that they don't know everything and uses the resources available to them to find the best answers for their patients. beware of people who seem to know everything because they might just be very confident about giving you their best guess. there are books scattered around the unit for a reason, it's not possible to memorize every ill and therapy out there - use books -

a good nurse - is not always 'ok' and sometimes needs help if they have a difficult patient load - they sometimes get overtime because they spend more time caring for their patients

a good nurse - listens and tries to resolve problems without being confrontational - tries to find the best solutions for problems taking care of the patients but also caring for their coworkers (helps other nurses and doctors, even if its not their job)

a good nurse - teaches

care plans = gateway to the hellish land of paperwork - perhaps a good exercise when you are a student as it helps you coordinate your thoughts on how to deal with people's various problems - in the workplace it's generally one of those forms which you are required to fill out and sign in order to satisfy regulatory agencies although no one ever even glances at it - so it's basically just something to keep you looking busy?

basically it's a list of a patients problems - what you plan to do about them - why you plan to do that - and the measured outcome and response to the outcome

some drug calculations can be tricky but most are not - so if you are confronted with a tricky one be sure to check it with a coworker or the pharmacist - and don't give them your answer or they might rush and make the same mistake to arrive at the same answer - pediatrics and icu tend to have more tricky calcs

i never remember every part of the human anatomy - even in school i only remembered the parts that were on the following days exam - even when talking to patients i usually try to use words that they are more likely to understand and relate to than pulling out a lot of latin mumbo jumbo - i think it's more important to remember how the parts work than what their names are - you probably have a pretty good understanding of the basic ones already - and if you ever really needed to know a term certainly there would be a resource around available for you

my most embarrassing moment was when i was dancing on a stage and my pants split down the back - oh you meant a nursing moment oops...

yes sometimes nursing you can have some very very bad days - but all together it's not a bad job and it can give you the opportunity to travel all over the world and to experience the extremes of human existance

it is easy to be inspired about nursing because everything you do matters - i get inspired to be a better nurse by remembering it could be my family member in that bed - and i get inspired to work by dreaming of vacation - but now that i'm on vacation i can't wait to get to work and feel like i'm doing something important again!

twinmommy+2, ADN, BSN, MSN

Specializes in ED.

Are nursing drug calculations hard? A little till you get the basic consept down and then you can apply it to many situations.

Do you always remember EVERY part of the anatomy? Nope! But you remember the main concept of the anatomy you're working with and the physiology of it.

Do you have a "most embarrassing moment" to share? My first patient in the nursing home had dementia and really didn't like me very much. One day I came in to take her blood pressure, trying every way to be nice about it, and she punched me twice, called me a bull dog, threatened to call the police many times, and then called me a white B@#ch lol. I felt really bad though weeks later when I came in and she started deteriorating and wasn't able to talk anymore. It was a sad thing.

Do you ever just want to give up? Nope, I've put my three kids and husband through all this school, no way am I quitting now.

What keeps you inspired to move on to the next level? My kids seeing what I've accomplished and using that to motivate themselves to persue higher education. Also my husband cause he works 2 jobs right now so I can go to school and not work. After I start working he won't have to work so hard and I really want to give that to him. And I want to show my parents that their daughter can become a college graduate (no one ever thought I would achieve this!)

sddlnscp

Specializes in NICU.

OK, I already partway know the answer to this, but, as far as bedside practice, what really are the differences between a RN and a NP? I am looking into becoming a Neonatal NP somewhere down the road (at least, that is my current goal and I highly doubt it likely to change) and I'm curious as to what I will be doing once I become an RN and what I will be doing differently once I become a NP? I know this question has been asked in various forms before, but it seems like every time it is answered, there is another piece of the puzzle included, so if you would be so kind as to oblige? Please?

Also, do FNPs ever get hired in a Neonatal unit (I've heard there's more demand for FNPs although my heart is really set on NICU and I would prefer NNP if it won't limit me out of a job) or would I (in your opinion, of course) be ok and have a good chance at landing a job as a NNP? I have already had one person respond to this question (about a hospital close by needing NNPs) for me, but I am interested in everybody's opinion because, as we all know, answers vary widely from state to state. ;)

Thanks so much everybody!!! And, thanks Student Nurse WV for starting this awesome thread! :)

OK, I already partway know the answer to this, but, as far as bedside practice, what really are the differences between a RN and a NP? I am looking into becoming a Neonatal NP somewhere down the road (at least, that is my current goal and I highly doubt it likely to change) and I'm curious as to what I will be doing once I become an RN and what I will be doing differently once I become a NP? I know this question has been asked in various forms before, but it seems like every time it is answered, there is another piece of the puzzle included, so if you would be so kind as to oblige? Please?

Also, do FNPs ever get hired in a Neonatal unit (I've heard there's more demand for FNPs although my heart is really set on NICU and I would prefer NNP if it won't limit me out of a job) or would I (in your opinion, of course) be ok and have a good chance at landing a job as a NNP? I have already had one person respond to this question (about a hospital close by needing NNPs) for me, but I am interested in everybody's opinion because, as we all know, answers vary widely from state to state. ;)

Thanks so much everybody!!! And, thanks Student Nurse WV for starting this awesome thread! :)

No problem. I think most nursing students have questions! I really hope someone can answer your questions about NP.

I have to thank everyone for really awesome questions and answers. Please keep both coming!!

I went to the student assistance forum as suggested by a previous poster but it said it was mostly for help on actual homework assignments (at least that was the gist of the forum I got). Hopefully this can be career advice that we keep very active or can be turned into a sticky.

And some more questions:

What type of stethoscope do students usually get?

What is the hardest part of your nursing career?

What is the most rewarding part?

How did you know nursing was for you?

Thanks for the excellent answers, please keep them coming :nurse:

Since we're still asking. If there is a particular area of nursing that you want to be in (or specialize in), i.e., OR, ICU, CCU, MICU (what I would love to do), ER, do you need to be "certified" in that particular field? Does this give you more money? How do you go about doing it - more school?

Thanks Again,

Cindy

twinmommy+2, ADN, BSN, MSN

Specializes in ED.

If there is a particular area of nursing that you want to be in (or specialize in), i.e., OR, ICU, CCU, MICU (what I would love to do), ER, do you need to be "certified" in that particular field? Does this give you more money? How do you go about doing it - more school?

I do know for ER you need PALS and ACLS certification. But (if I'm right) they help you to get certified and its not something that you need if your a new grad coming right into the profession. (i'm still a student though :rolleyes: )

sirI, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

No problem. I think most nursing students have questions! I really hope someone can answer your questions about NP.

I have to thank everyone for really awesome questions and answers. Please keep both coming!!

I went to the student assistance forum as suggested by a previous poster but it said it was mostly for help on actual homework assignments (at least that was the gist of the forum I got). Hopefully this can be career advice that we keep very active or can be turned into a sticky.

And some more questions:

What type of stethoscope do students usually get?

What is the hardest part of your nursing career?

What is the most rewarding part?

How did you know nursing was for you?

Thanks for the excellent answers, please keep them coming :nurse:

Stethoscopes, there are those who can tell you exactly what to get. Keep asking around. Others who have started their programs and almost finished need to tell you what is best.

It just depends on the type with which you are most comfortable. Littmann and Sprague have scopes that come in many different types. I would think that spending alot of money on a expensive one should come later. Again, if you can afford to get a great one over a good one, do it. Just remember, they can and WILL get stolen if you are not careful.

My career has been widely varied and I have had many "hard" parts. All unrelated to the other. I think teaching, was my most significant challenge. It was very satisfying and frustrating at the same time. But, I truly LOVED to teach. Seeing that little light come on when a student got the pharmacology problem was great. Having them come back to me after a few years and tell me it was worth it and they could see my eyes during a very trying time, made it all worth while.

Losing a patient despite your best efforts, and I am sure others agree, is the hardest part of it all. I know death is a part of life, but, when you lose babies, children, new mom's who have just given birth, teens, young fathers, grandmothers, :crying2: .........it hurts so much.

Nursing was for me........as a small girl. I was always hunting subjects to operate on!!!!!! I cut up frogs just to see what was inside. I was fascinated with anatomy.

But, I had no idea I would be a nurse practitioner, even after I finished nursing school. That came later.

sirI, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

Since we're still asking. If there is a particular area of nursing that you want to be in (or specialize in), i.e., OR, ICU, CCU, MICU (what I would love to do), ER, do you need to be "certified" in that particular field? Does this give you more money? How do you go about doing it - more school?

Thanks Again,

Cindy

I suggest obtaining certification, yes. It does show that you have obtained an even higher level of learning. Some institutions/facilities do pay a little more for the certification and some do not. You do not need more college/university education to do this. Now, some certs require an MSN to sit for the exam. Example: Woman's Health Care NP, you must have MSN to sit. You will be required to have a certain amount (years/hours) of experience to take certification exams in certain areas, too.

And, yes, you should receive certification in ACLS, PALS, NRP, trauma nurse course,........others, especially if you are working as an FNP.

What keeps you inspired to move on to the next level? My kids seeing what I've accomplished and using that to motivate themselves to persue higher education. Also my husband cause he works 2 jobs right now so I can go to school and not work. After I start working he won't have to work so hard and I really want to give that to him. And I want to show my parents that their daughter can become a college graduate (no one ever thought I would achieve this!)

Are you my twin? :)

O.K., from a "pre-nursing" student a lot of questions come to mind. Here are just a few that I have. :rolleyes:

Are nursing drug calculations hard?

Do you always remember EVERY part of the anatomy?

Do you have a "most embarrassing moment" to share?

Do you ever just want to give up?

What keeps you inspired to move on to the next level?

Thanks,

Cindy

In order: :chuckle

No, not even for me!

Ha! I've been know to rub my elbow and C/O shoulder pain, LOL, let alone the fissures and foramen of bones. You will remember everything you'll need to to succeed through school then your specialty. Don't worry your nursing instructors will review that old A&P

So hard to put my finger on one embarrassing moment...we all have them, though

Yes!

I love my job anyway

Since we're still asking. If there is a particular area of nursing that you want to be in (or specialize in), i.e., OR, ICU, CCU, MICU (what I would love to do), ER, do you need to be "certified" in that particular field? Does this give you more money? How do you go about doing it - more school?

Thanks Again,

Cindy

You can get certified in any area that you want to work in. Most certs require the equivalent of 2 years FT hours in the last 4 years of experience in that specialty. So, no, it's not required. Looks good on a resume some places pay more. Some specialties have short classes to take, others are self study only, all have a boards like exam.

dutchgirl

Specializes in peds, peds ICU, OB, Cath Lab,home health.

Hi Everyone!

I am a pre-nursing student that eventually hopes to be a FNP. I know that student nurses (myself included :) ) have questions that they want answered. Sometimes even researching won't get the answers that nurses who lived through it have. In this thread I hope pre-nursing and nursing students will come and post questions that experienced nurses could answer.

I thought I could start with some questions and hopefully we will get some more questions and answers. No such thing as a dumb question! So ask away!

Since I am just a lowly pre-nursing student, I am clueless on a lot of subjects :) I am curious about the daily activities of a bedside nurse. I am sure it fluctuates from floor to floor but a general run down would be awesome.

What are the traits you think that make a great nurse?

Could anyone fill me in on what care plans are?

Well hopefully this will be the start of a very informative thread. Please post questions!

Nursing care plans-a fancy name for the problem solving process that occurs in every part of life. We just give fancier names to the problems, and we have a knowledge base to describe those problems in nursing terms. Once you've identified and named the problem (the nursing "diagnosis") which I'll make one up for you now in lay terms- "the potential to bleed to death related to the large pumping artery wound in the groin". You can see that would be somewhat of a problem, and your knowledge of the circulatory sytem would lead you to that diagnosis. That diagnosis was made from your ASSESSMENT. So, now you have to make a plan, and that plan has to have a goal. Let's see, what kind of goal - how about, patient bleeding is stopped and he lives. The plan is an action plan - the things you are going to do to achieve that goal. There could be many actions. I would say (remembering first aid for bleeding, direct pressure) I would apply direct pressure to the bleeding wound until it stopped and have someone call 911. (Of course as a nurse in the hospital, YOU would be 911) As with every plan, you have to EVALUATE your action - did the action meet the desired goal? Did the bleeding stop and the patient live? If not, then you go back to step one - ASSESS again, make a new plan. Care plans are not static, they are constantly revised and adjusted because the patient status is always changing. And don't worry, there are a lot of references to help you with care plans...keep reading about nurses and health care, you'll do fine!

OK, I already partway know the answer to this, but, as far as bedside practice, what really are the differences between a RN and a NP? I am looking into becoming a Neonatal NP somewhere down the road (at least, that is my current goal and I highly doubt it likely to change) and I'm curious as to what I will be doing once I become an RN and what I will be doing differently once I become a NP? I know this question has been asked in various forms before, but it seems like every time it is answered, there is another piece of the puzzle included, so if you would be so kind as to oblige? Please?

Also, do FNPs ever get hired in a Neonatal unit (I've heard there's more demand for FNPs although my heart is really set on NICU and I would prefer NNP if it won't limit me out of a job) or would I (in your opinion, of course) be ok and have a good chance at landing a job as a NNP? I have already had one person respond to this question (about a hospital close by needing NNPs) for me, but I am interested in everybody's opinion because, as we all know, answers vary widely from state to state. ;)

Thanks so much everybody!!! And, thanks Student Nurse WV for starting this awesome thread! :)

Also look into neonatal clinical nurse specialist (CNS) it's a little more hands on than NP, working in the NICU alongside the primary RNs as a resource and doing tough procedures.

Nursing care plans-a fancy name for the problem solving process that occurs in every part of life. We just give fancier names to the problems, and we have a knowledge base to describe those problems in nursing terms. Once you've identified and named the problem (the nursing "diagnosis") which I'll make one up for you now in lay terms- "the potential to bleed to death related to the large pumping artery wound in the groin". You can see that would be somewhat of a problem, and your knowledge of the circulatory sytem would lead you to that diagnosis. That diagnosis was made from your ASSESSMENT. So, now you have to make a plan, and that plan has to have a goal. Let's see, what kind of goal - how about, patient bleeding is stopped and he lives. The plan is an action plan - the things you are going to do to achieve that goal. There could be many actions. I would say (remembering first aid for bleeding, direct pressure) I would apply direct pressure to the bleeding wound until it stopped and have someone call 911. (Of course as a nurse in the hospital, YOU would be 911) As with every plan, you have to EVALUATE your action - did the action meet the desired goal? Did the bleeding stop and the patient live? If not, then you go back to step one - ASSESS again, make a new plan. Care plans are not static, they are constantly revised and adjusted because the patient status is always changing. And don't worry, there are a lot of references to help you with care plans...keep reading about nurses and health care, you'll do fine!

What a great description! Thank you so much for this! :)

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