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Memory care-Can you pass meds in the dining room?

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We got a new supervisor that says we can no longer give meds in the dining room and that we have to tell each resident what med they are each taking. And she is a GN not an RN but is signing her name with RN.

Kitiger, RN

Specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics. Has 42 years experience.

So . . . when a resident takes 8 pills at a time, you name each pill as you hand it to him? And all meds must be given before residents head to the dining room?

And you have plenty of time to do this?

As to the GN signing "RN", have you congratulated her on passing the NCLEX? That might give you the opening to point out that only an RN may sign "RN".

https://www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/advocacy/state/title-nurse-protection/

Thanks Kitiger. It's very stressful right now. I am just curious. If the State walked in today and saw that she signed the charts with RN and she is not an RN do you think she would get into any trouble with the state board?

Kitiger, RN

Specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics. Has 42 years experience.

I don't know whether she would get in trouble.

But mentioning that might be another opening to talk to her.

CapeCodMermaid, RN

Specializes in Gerontology, Med surg, Home Health. Has 30 years experience.

1. She is NOT an RN so she can't sign RN

2. No meds should be given in the dining room unless the directions indicate give with food or the resident requests ir

Straight No Chaser, ASN, LPN

Specializes in Sub-Acute. Has 5 years experience.

Its a dignity issue and generally against policy most places. 

The exception is if the meds are to be taken with a meal. 

In reality, we do it but not when state is in the building and not if anyone asks.  

CapeCodMermaid, RN

Specializes in Gerontology, Med surg, Home Health. Has 30 years experience.

Best way around this: get an MD order and care plan it. Sometimes you get one shot to give someone with dementia their meds.

No med carts in the dining room its an infection control and quality of life issue. You can only give meds that are ordered to be given with meals. 

 

Cheechwizard, BSN, RN

Specializes in Neuro, med surge, Jack of all trades.

Can you or should you is the question.

Sure, you can pass meds wherever you want.

Would giving medications violate patient privacy? How about the 5-7 rules for medication administration with what you're giving? 

 

On 6/8/2020 at 10:25 AM, Blackcat99 said:

We got a new supervisor that says we can no longer give meds in the dining room and that we have to tell each resident what med they are each taking. And she is a GN not an RN but is signing her name with RN.

Wow, what a dumb ***.

walkingon, CNA, LPN

Specializes in LTC, Assisted Living. Has 10 years experience.

The dining room is where we pass the meds at my facility.  We pre-set the meds on trays with their patient identifiers and take the trays around rather than drag the cart.  Never heard of not being allowed to pass meds in the dining room.  We don’t do glucose checks in there, but meds, yes.

CapeCodMermaid, RN

Specializes in Gerontology, Med surg, Home Health. Has 30 years experience.

Is this a SNF? We would get cited for pre-pouring meds 

walkingon, CNA, LPN

Specializes in LTC, Assisted Living. Has 10 years experience.

No, it’s a small memory care assisted living facility.  State watches us set and pass meds from our trays when they’re in the house.

Dani_Mila, ASN, RN

Specializes in Rehabilitation, Sub-Acute, Geriatrics, LTC, Psych. Has 3 years experience.

At my place, passing meds in the dining hall is not allowed because of privacy and dignity issues. Also, a GN is not an official RN. Once she passed her NCLEX and becomes an official RN, then she can earn her title of a RN.

Edited by Dani_Mila
Added new info

On 12/11/2020 at 12:06 AM, Dani_Mila said:

At my place, passing meds in the dining hall is not allowed because of privacy and dignity issues.

Meanwhile, for most of the patients in these places, they're not getting assessed, their treatments aren't actually getting done, just signed off that they are.  The 20-30 patient / nurse ratio forced on everyone should be crime... But hey, at least they're not getting their meds at the table in front of other residents who are also getting their meds.