Latest Comments by irish_fiddler747

irish_fiddler747 1,160 Views

Joined: Nov 24, '08; Posts: 15 (20% Liked) ; Likes: 4

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    cara1017 likes this.

    I guess I'm one of the few people to not vote all-nights, but at this point in my career (I've only been off orientation 4 months) I am enjoying rotating -- as long as I have a few days to switch back to days! (days to nights is easier). I work 3 weeks days/3 weeks nights and back. I don't like how nights messes with your body clock because I like to have a "normal" schedule on my days off even when I'm on nights. But I like the atmosphere of working on nights -- it's actually CALM sometimes and you're not running around like a madman for 12 hours every shift. But on day shift you get the experience of interacting with PT/OT/speech/more doctors, are able to do more patient education (sometimes) and get to be awake when the sun is up. Day shift is always crazy though. So for now I'm happy rotating - don't necessarily want to do it for the rest of my career though.

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    I'm sure that this question has been asked many times, but I can't seem to find the answer........when do people normally take the NCLEX? I'm graduating the first week of May -- would taking it sometime before the end of May be typical? end of June? thanks!

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    Starting a summer internship in the ER this week! I'm excited but not quite sure what to expect..............so for you ER nurses out there, any suggestions for making it a great learning experience for me but ALSO helping/not annoying my busy nurse mentor???? thanks!!!

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    I have a similar question r/t cardiac output. I have to have 6 prioritized nsg dx for my pt, the top 3 being the ones I have to write interventions etc for. She was in the hospital simply because she had fractured her patella. My #1 is Ineffective tissue perfusion: peripheral and renal r/t immobility & type 2 DM. (mostly bed/chair-bound, hematuria, hi BG, inc BUN & creatinine etc). #2 is Impaired mobility for obvious reasons, and I have #3 as Impaired GI function r/t immobility and GERD AEB constipation, c/o nausea, etc.

    For 4 I'm thinking about Risk for infection r/t altered immune status, immobility, and intermittent urinary incontinence AEB dec WBC, anemia. After that I wanted to put risk for decreased cardiac output because she had been hospitalized several times for severe tachycardia and had been on propanolol forever because of heart rhythm problems. I also found in her chart that she had had CHF but she didn't really present with symptoms of CHF. I'm afraid that I'll get in trouble for not having in in the top 3 b/c of ABCs, but that's not the reason she was in the hospital and her heart issue seemed to be well controlled and not giving her any trouble. Thoughts? Is "risk for" dec CO even a valid dx?

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    Chapis likes this.

    1:10 AM: brewing another cup of coffee, thinking about the fact that I'm already behind in all my classes and how next semester will only get way harder, and wondering...................why again did I pick a hard major that just prepares you for an even harder career? A tent in the woods just staring up at the sky sounds pretty darn nice.

    In all seriousness....I've gotten As on all my tests so far but I feel like right now I'm doing the bare minimum to get by and have projects after projects piling up to get done "eventually" ....TMI (too much information) takes on a whole new meaning when you're sitting in your 6th hour of lecture for the day and it gets pretty discouraging sometimes knowing that this is what I'll feel like for the next 4 semesters. But I guess if other people have survived then I can too. :smilecoffeeIlovecof

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    campusbooks.com! Enter the ISBNs and it compares all the major sites for you.

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    Hi y'all! I have orientation for my first semester of nursing school on the 31st and I don't know if I've ever been so excited and nervous at the same time!

    But I have a question for those of you who've survived first semester. I'm not TOO terribly worried about the academic side of things (though I know it'll be hard), because I've done really well in my pre-reqs and can study hard when I need to. My problem is that it has been/usually is at the expense of sleep. Perfectionist that I am, if I have a hard test in the morning, I tend to stay up half the night (or more) studying to make sure I get the grade I want instead of sleeping. But I know this isn't healthy and that sleep is REALLY important for a lot of things, physically and mentally. So.....do you have any tips on how to balance the demands of nursing school academics with the fact that sleep is necessary to function well? Any advice would be really appreciated!

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    If you haven't bought your books yet: don't buy them all at the bookstore!!!!! Look up the ISBNs of the ones you'll need and then go to campusbooks.com and it will compare all the common sites for you and find the cheapest ones. I've found some crazy deals-- you can potentially save a few hundred dollars! (I'm still getting a lot of mine on campus, but you can save at least a few $$.)

    Orientation on the 31st-- I'm so stoked!!! I've been waiting so long for this!

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    dhinson45 and UM Review RN like this.

    Wow. That made me cry, and I don't often. I'm starting nursing school in the fall and it's stories like this that I know will help me get through the tough parts.

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    Next week I'll be done with my last semester of pre-req's (yay! ) and I was wondering if people who are in their actual nursing classes have kept their micro books for reference (or if you didn't, if you wish you did.) I'm def keeping A&P and patho, but I wasn't sure if micro would be useful later or not (pharmacology, maybe?) Any thoughts/experience?

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    Quote from Shadow31
    This is what got me through NS as well. I acually factored Starbucks into my school expenses! :wink2:
    We have a starbucks on campus that we can use our meal plan for....unfortunately one drink uses almost as much money as a whole cafeteria meal!

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    Hey y'all! I'm a sophomore starting the nursing program in Aug. '09.....and I absolutely CANNOT wait (even though I know it's gonna be a ton of work.) I was wondering.......I've seen a fair amount around this site and heard from other people that shadowing is a good idea. I would LOVE to get some sort of job, any kind, in the hospital for the summer, but last year I didn't have any luck finding people that only wanted to hire you for a few months. So the second best (besides volunteering I guess...) -- shadowing for a few days to see closer up what I'll be getting into. Can any of you who've shadowed or have had people shadow you give me some pointers on how to go about setting it up? Do you know who in the hospital I would typically contact to do this sort of thing? (and for those who've had ppl shadow you, do you find it really annoying? :chuckle ) Thanks a lot!

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    Hi all, I posted this on the prenursing forum a few days ago but realized my question is pretty much for people who've already gone through a lot of the program already, or even graduated.

    Basically, what do you think I should focus on the most in patho? I read on another thread someone said don't try to learn it all because it's impossible....which is what I'm trying to do.....if that's true, what from patho has helped you the most? (I've kinda figured out how to get good grades in the class but I'm interested in knowing what will help me most down the road.) This afternoon I overheard people studying the same things I am right now (renal) and after talking to them I realized they were actually in peds and reviewing nclex questions; I kinda forget we'll be going over this stuff a lot more over the next couple years. Any advice? thanks for any tips!!!

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    (original post)

    I'm a prenursing sophomore, planning to start nursing school in Fall '09 (can't wait!). I'm in Patho right now (a 1 semester class at my school) and I'm having the hardest time getting all the information to stick!!! I've already taken A & P & I have a 4.0....but there's soooo much information to absorb in patho, it feels like I can only take so much before it just bounces off my head and what actually makes it inside my brain all blurrs together. I'm doing everything I can think of.....spending hours and hours reading and rereading the book, reviewing anatomy, doing study guides, make flashcards, etc. It's paying off because I'm learning it well enough to do well on difficult tests (hi 90's avg in the class) but I still feel like there's way more I don't know than I do and there's no way to learn it all even though I really do want to! My question for people already in the program is this: does patho "stick" better once you're in clinicals and see/take care of actual people that have the diseases I'm reading about? What's the most important thing to take away from patho going into the nursing program?

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    thanks! I love what I'm learning now, which is why it's frustrating 'cause I wish I could remember it better....thanks for the encouragement though!

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    Hey everyone! I'm a prenursing sophomore, planning to start nursing school in Fall '09 (can't wait!). I'm in Patho right now (a 1 semester class at my school) and I'm having the hardest time getting all the information to stick!!! I've already taken A & P & I have a 4.0....but there's soooo much information to absorb in patho, it feels like I can only take so much before it just bounces off my head and what actually makes it inside my brain all blurrs together. I'm doing everything I can think of.....spending hours and hours reading and rereading the book, reviewing anatomy, doing study guides, make flashcards, etc. It's paying off because I'm learning it well enough to do well on difficult tests (hi 90's avg in the class) but I still feel like there's way more I don't know than I do and there's no way to learn it all even though I really do want to! My question for people already in the program is this: does patho "stick" better once you're in clinicals and see/take care of actual people that have the diseases I'm reading about? What's the most important thing to take away from patho going into the nursing program-- i.e. what aspects of patho have ended up helping you the most? thanks!!!



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