Meds that should never be given IV push

Posted

Please help! I can not find a list of meds that should never be given IV push. Does anyone know where I can find one?

Thanks!

stn2003

stn2003, RN

132 Posts

Please help! I can not find a list of meds that should never be given IV push. Does anyone know where I can find one?

Thanks!

repost this to the general nursing discussion board, i bet a lot of experienced RNs know of meds they would not administer IV push! i looked a bit on line, but didn't find anything helpful. : / sorry : )

begalli

begalli

Specializes in Critical Care/ICU. 1,277 Posts

KCL...never give KCL IV push.

:)

JVanRN

JVanRN

406 Posts

visterel (sp?)

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience. 105 Articles; 5,349 Posts

ANY type of insulin other than regular insulin :eek: (In other words, regular insulin is the only type of insulin that can be given IV push). Be careful... there are several types of insulin which "look" like regular (clear), but are not, Lantus being one prime example.

Mimi2RN

Mimi2RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 27 years experience. 1,142 Posts

Most antibiotics should be infused slowly.

I've found it is important to read the vials because sometimes docs specify to push something IV but the vial says something like IM, may not make a whole lot of difference but its better safe than sorry.

NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. Has 45 years experience. 11 Articles; 17,292 Posts

i've found it is important to read the vials because sometimes docs specify to push something iv but the vial says something like im, may not make a whole lot of difference but its better safe than sorry.

makes a huge differnece if a vial is labeled for im use only--never give med by any other route, even if doctor insists.

could not find a specific list of meds not to give iv push but did find these gems:

[color=#397574]ismp's list of high-alert medications

http://www.ismp.org/msaarticles/highalertprint.htm

[color=#397574]

[color=#397574]

iv dilution list by alphabet:

http://www.globalrph.com/dilutionlist.htm

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience. 105 Articles; 5,349 Posts

makes a huge differnece if a vial is labeled for im use only--never give med by any other route, even if doctor insists.

could not find a specific list of meds not to give iv push but did find these gems:

[color=#397574]ismp's list of high-alert medications

http://www.ismp.org/msaarticles/highalertprint.htm

[color=#397574]

[color=#397574]

iv dilution list by alphabet:

http://www.globalrph.com/dilutionlist.htm

wow! great resource! thanks so much, karen.

one other note of caution: beware when using librium (not lithium). comes with a dilutent which is for im use only. very easy to make a mistake with this one and give the dilutent-mix iv push, which could result in significant patient harm.

Salty1

Salty1

76 Posts

makes a huge differnece if a vial is labeled for im use only--never give med by any other route, even if doctor insists.

could not find a specific list of meds not to give iv push but did find these gems:

[color=#397574]ismp's list of high-alert medications

http://www.ismp.org/msaarticles/highalertprint.htm

[color=#397574]

[color=#397574]

iv dilution list by alphabet:

http://www.globalrph.com/dilutionlist.htm

echoing vicky's comment i must say that the alphabetic list for iv dilutions is an excellent resource.

i recall a board certified internist once requesting that i give vitamin k iv push. when i declined he replied that it was no problem - he would give it himself. i advised him that before doing so he should read the package insert which i handed him containing the ususal risk vs. benefit info and bold letters stating fatal reactions have occurred from iv injection. his response was "oh! ok, give it as you usually do."

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