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medic alert alarm

Posted

Specializes in LTC.

Am making a pitch for the use of those medic alert alarms.

You know the one - 'help! I've fallen and I can't get up' kind. I've posted multiple postings over the past few years in support of the purchase and use of those alarm systems. And I'm doing it again. And once again, I do so in response to my medical emergency need this past early May.

Those alarms are usually triggered by the wearer, personally, like myself as I've used it twice in the past. But this time, my sister just grabbed my necklace unit and triggered it to call for 911 assist. I was hemorrhaging BIG TIME in the BR and losing consciousness.

Needless to say, here I am and posting this call for consideration of these systems for any of you or yours in vulnerable health or safety situations. The possibilities are numerous & endless and well discussed on TV and other advertisements.

PLEASE! Seriously, think about it and ACT UPON IT! We've all heard horror stories. I came too close to a TERRIBLE outcome.

Just my plug!

Stay safe all.

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

17 minutes ago, amoLucia said:

Am making a pitch for the use of those medic alert alarms.

You know the one - 'help! I've fallen and I can't get up' kind. I've posted multiple postings over the past few years in support of the purchase and use of those alarm systems. And I'm doing it again. And once again, I do so in response to my medical emergency need this past early May.

Those alarms are usually triggered by the wearer, personally, like myself as I've used it twice in the past. But this time, my sister just grabbed my necklace unit and triggered it to call for 911 assist. I was hemorrhaging BIG TIME in the BR and losing consciousness.

Needless to say, here I am and posting this call for consideration of these systems for any of you or yours in vulnerable health or safety situations. The possibilities are numerous & endless and well discussed on TV and other advertisements.

PLEASE! Seriously, think about it and ACT UPON IT! We've all heard horror stories. I came too close to a TERRIBLE outcome.

Just my plug!

Stay safe all.

They are legit, and anyone who has medical issues and lives alone, or has limitations with physical/medical assistance, should consider one

Edited by Hoosier_RN

Had a LO receiving hospice care, was able to care for self until the last 48 hours. The LO was willing to wear a device but did not want it to automatically call 911. We programmed the unit with the numbers of family members and it would call us in succession as necessary. When we answered we had the option to stay on the line and also summon 911 if necessary after hearing what was going on.

I definitely support and encourage their use!

The only thing I don’t like about them is it gives a false sense of security.

My ex husbands grandmother was needing long term care living. She was insisting that all she needed was one of those medic alerts and she could live on her own, because she would magically be fixed if she fell at home. She was not independent enough to live at home and a fall would have been deadly.

We finally convinced her into a nice LTC facility where she lived out her final days. But she was fortunate to have a family to recognize the fact that was not enough protection.

Im so very glad that you were helped by that medic alert bracelet amolucia!! Thankful you are alive!!

Nunya, BSN

Specializes in NICU/Mother-Baby/Peds/Mgmt. Has 39 years experience.

4 hours ago, amoLucia said:

Am making a pitch for the use of those medic alert alarms.

You know the one - 'help! I've fallen and I can't get up' kind. I've posted multiple postings over the past few years in support of the purchase and use of those alarm systems. And I'm doing it again. And once again, I do so in response to my medical emergency need this past early May.

Those alarms are usually triggered by the wearer, personally, like myself as I've used it twice in the past. But this time, my sister just grabbed my necklace unit and triggered it to call for 911 assist. I was hemorrhaging BIG TIME in the BR and losing consciousness.

Needless to say, here I am and posting this call for consideration of these systems for any of you or yours in vulnerable health or safety situations. The possibilities are numerous & endless and well discussed on TV and other advertisements.

PLEASE! Seriously, think about it and ACT UPON IT! We've all heard horror stories. I came too close to a TERRIBLE outcome.

Just my plug!

Stay safe all.

I'm glad everything turned out fine with you! I have a question, how do paramedics get in the house? I've thought about this for my mom for when I go back to work but if she falls and can't get up and I'm not home...?

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

6 hours ago, Elaine M said:

I'm glad everything turned out fine with you! I have a question, how do paramedics get in the house? I've thought about this for my mom for when I go back to work but if she falls and can't get up and I'm not home...?

Usually police come as well. They will search for a landlord/property manager with a key or break the door in-only as a last resort necessity. Also, these companies also usually have a relative on file for contact who may be able assist with entry

Edited by Hoosier_RN

Nunya, BSN

Specializes in NICU/Mother-Baby/Peds/Mgmt. Has 39 years experience.

1 hour ago, Hoosier_RN said:

Usually police come as well. They will search for a landlord/property manager with a key or break the door in-only as a last resort necessity. Also, these companies also usually have a relative on file for contact who may be able assist with entry

Well that doesn't help if she's in a home and the relative/friend is unavailable. Thanks for the info.

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

To Elaine & Hoosier - Re home entry, my service provider provided me with a door key box lock The service gives my personally selected "magic code number" to the 911 emergency dispatch. When they arrive, all they do is push the 4 digits and the box opens with my key inside. Surprising, but I have had EMT, police and fire ALL respond - like they were all just in the neighborhood and stopped by to 'lend a hand'!

When the alarm triggers, the provider company tries to establish telephone contact with the client to determine the alarm veracity. If I tell them I'm sorry and the alarm squished between my boobs (as it did once), they'll just reset my alarm. No harm, no foul as I have accidently triggered it other times also.

If I respond, I can tell them what is needed. The 1st time I TRULY NEEDED to trigger, I was OK after a dumb fall but I couldn't get up off the floor by myself. I told them I would need the EMT 'muscle power'. Shortly thereafter, the squad arrived and used the 'key lock box' to get in. Multiple folk got me onto a lift and then I was lifted to a chair. They made sure I was walking and OK to decline a hosp visit.

The 2nd time, I was very SICK - so decompensated and weak, I went down to the floor. Triggered my alarm for help. Again, EMT 911 responded using the key lock box. I was hosp/rehab for 7 wks.

If there is NO response as the alarm company tries to make telephone contact, they WILL dispatch 911. No time to waste in an emergency. I own my place; only 1 neighbor has a key. Who would know that at 1am??? They will also then call a designated next-of-kin or responsible party, etc to alert them of the alarm and 911 dispatch. My sister met me en route out of my house on my way to the hosp in the above situation.

This 3rd time, I was too out of it to remember much. BUT ... the purpose of the alarm was achieved as my sister just pushed the button. And everything then unfolded as it should have and DID. It contributed to the speedy response needed for my well-being, literally, my survival.

To LovingLife - I understand your concern about ex's grandma. The elderly SUPER seriously UNDERestimate their frailty and vulnerability. And they minimize the potential for serious outcome - like, "oh yeah, it's only a fall, I'll get some help, and I'll be OK". No, that's not reality. At some point, there comes one's realization that living alone is no longer a real option.

The biggest caveat is that the client MUST wear the necklace/bracelet. That's THE issue that freq comes up in the 'horror stories'. It sitting on the BR sink counter or the night table does NOT count!

Another issue is that the inside door shouldn't be using chain locks or slide bolts on the doors.

There are mucho systems out there for purchase or rental. All with varying prices and options. Due diligence/research is absol nec! Don't just look for CHEAP or limited services. Get what's needed for the pt's safety sake and for your peace of mind! I've had my system for 10 yrs - they get an autocheck monthly. Easy peasy!

Seriously folk. even if one person gets a system for self or a loved one, then I feel like I've made my point.

To Elaine - I wholeheartedly encourage you to move ahead on this for your Mom.

CharleeFoxtrot, BSN, RN

Has 10 years experience.

21 hours ago, LovingLife123 said:

... She was insisting that all she needed was one of those medic alerts and she could live on her own, because she would magically be fixed if she fell at home. She was not independent enough to live at home and a fall would have been deadly.

Just a PSA for folks reading this thread there are units now that have a "fall detect" system on them. If the unit senses a fall, it alerts the company and they open up the speaker in the home and try to make contact with the patient. If the company can't get the person to answer they call for first responders.

Also, there are some that are tied to a cellphone with that same feature that if the unit senses a fall it uses the cellphone for contact. Of course it's not better than preventing a fall but it's much better than nothing.

Edited by CharleeFoxtrot
clarity