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Lpns, can I please pick your brains?!

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by Salbright90 Salbright90 (New) New

Hi! I am currently flip flopping between a few different options for future career. I'm 26, late start due to staying home with my kids. In my second semester of general classes that will pretty much go toward whatever route I take. My school has a LPN program and I am highly considering it. Because the the time it takes,nursing has always been at the top of my list and I'd like to be working full time when my youngest starts kindergarten. Few questions, where do you all work? I've done research but would just like personal answers. Are any of you in hospitals? Are lpns hired in nicu at all? Is the role more similar to an RN or a medical assitant? That part of my research has been confusing. Also, what is your pay like? If you're not comfortable saying outright what you make, I totally understand! Just hoping for a range! Thanks so much for your help!

Archerlpvn, LPN, LVN

Specializes in Home health, Addictions, Detox, Psych and clinics.. Has 9 years experience.

Hi there. The role of an LPN is in nursing. We are similar to an RN but not an RN and not always interchangeable. We work "under" our own licensure and are responsible for own actions. Where LPNs and RNs differ, is in scope of practice. RNs can do more because they do have more nursing education. I currently work in a inpatient adolescent, psychiatric facility full time and work part time in home health. I get 22$ per hour at my full time and 20$ per hour at my part time. LPNs typically don't work in NICU, as generally patients acuity levels are too high for what most states scope of practice will allow LPNs to care for. Some rural area hospitals still have LPNs on the floor, and a lot of hospitals in general use LPNs in their associated outpatient specialty clinics.

OrganizedChaos, LVN

Specializes in M/S, LTC, Corrections, PDN & drug rehab. Has 10 years experience.

where do you all work?

I have worked in corrections, nursing homes & pediatric private duty.

Are any of you in hospitals?

I was offered a hospital position right out of nursing school & one hospital system near me hires LVNs on occasion.

Are lpns hired in nicu at all?

No. Even though here in Texas the LVN scope of practice is pretty wide, RNs have a wider scope & are hired into the NICU. In fact, the only children's hospital near me only hires RNs. Even on the general floors.

Is the role more similar to an RN or a medical assistant?

It is similar to an RN but not medical assistant. Medical assistants follow the medical model of care where as nurses & aides follow the nursing model of care. But LVNs & RNs differ due to the scope of practice. RNs have a wide scope of practice & can work generally in any area & do travel nursing in any state. Whereas LVNs, depending on the state, have a limited scope of practice & can't do travel nursing as easily as RNs due to the different scope of practice in every state. Both LVNs & RNs have their own licenses.

Also, what is your pay like?

The most I have ever made is $22/hr & the least was $18.50/hr. It maybe different where you live so I would go on glassdoor.com to see what the average range is for your area. I live in a rural area where the cost of living is low so the pay isn't as high.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

I was an LPN/LVN for four years, from 2006 to 2010. I worked in long term care (a.k.a. the nursing home industry), skilled rehab, and psych.

The vast majority of hospitals in the U.S. will never hire an LPN into NICU because it is a critical care area. I know we were told to "never say never." However, in this day and age you will not be hired into anyone's NICU in the U.S. without an RN license.

As an LPN/LVN, my lowest pay rate was $18.50/hr and my highest wage was $27/hr. Pay is very dependent upon cost of living and geographic location. For instance, an LPN in Oklahoma will earn substantially less than his/her counterpart in NY.

Also, certain specialties (e.g. clinic nursing, doctors offices) tend to pay less due to the desirable, coveted daylight working hours in addition to getting most weekends and holidays off.

Is the role more similar to an RN or a medical assitant?
The LPN role is more similar to that of an RN. LPNs are licensed nurses. RNs are licensed nurses. LPNs and RNs fall under the nursing model of care provision, whereas medical assistants fall into the medical model of care provision. Look up the differences between the nursing model and the medical model.

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

Here in Canada, my hospital employs LPNs in the NICU. We have one of the largest NICUs in wester Canada.

Not an area I've ever had a desire to work.

OrganizedChaos, LVN

Specializes in M/S, LTC, Corrections, PDN & drug rehab. Has 10 years experience.

Here in Canada, my hospital employs LPNs in the NICU. We have one of the largest NICUs in wester Canada.

Not an area I've ever had a desire to work.

Woah. Now I want to move to Canada even more!

Woah. Now I want to move to Canada even more!

I don't think our licenses would be recognized up there. From what I understand, LPN education up there is 2 years (our ADN) and their RN is a 4 year program (our BSN).

It would definitely be interesting to see the difference in education between their LPN and ours.

OrganizedChaos, LVN

Specializes in M/S, LTC, Corrections, PDN & drug rehab. Has 10 years experience.

I don't think our licenses would be recognized up there. From what I understand, LPN education up there is 2 years (our ADN) and their RN is a 4 year program (our BSN).

It would definitely be interesting to see the difference in education between their LPN and ours.

Well I'm gonna go back to school anyway! Haha. But it all sounds good.

BSNbeDONE, ASN, BSN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health. Has 35 years experience.

The hospital I creently work at PRN (float pool) still employs LPNs on the Med-surg units. However, it is a teaching hospital. The one I left, after receiving my RN license and that year-or-two paid RN experience, still has a small, countable number LPNs because they helped lay the bricks on the place (they've been there so long). But they're no longer hiring LPNs. My LPN pay there was $28/HR plus shift diff (pool pay). Regular RN (new-grad) pay was $21-23/hr (I was told), and back then (2010), the LPNs weren't too far behind that if they had been there umpteen years.

I transitioned from a float pool LPN into a float pool RN simply for the pay increase of $10/HR. It had been many years since I'd received $21/HR as an LPN. Therefore, I was not receptive at all to working full time to what would have been a financial step backwards.

I work for the executive branch of the federal government (IHS). I work in a fairly rural setting; outpatient clinic and some inpatient. I've worked both. I've also worked in public health and home health.

I have been an LPN for 10 years and spent 8 of them working in a pediatricians office. I left 2 years ago due to changes in management as well as my family responsibilities changed. I LOVED my job. The pay was not great. I started out at $15/hr and when I left I was at $17.65 (in Ohio). Now, after 2 years off, I have started class to get my RN but another LPN job has kind of come my way that has piqued my interest and I think I'm going to put it on hold. It's in a prison hospital with an agency that could turn into a permanent hire to work for the state. Pay starts at $20/hr. Your job opportunities as an LPN are not as varied as an RN but jobs ARE out there.