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Lpn & asn are are being phased out.

ADN/BSN   (32,068 Views | 182 Replies)

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CHESSIE has 30 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg, OR, Peds, Patient Education.

177 Posts; 6,451 Profile Views

Yes, I can see the reason. It is the all mighty dollar. I hope that the experienced RNs and LPNs will not lose their joba and be grandfathered so that they can continue to give great nursing care. If obtaining a further degree such as a BSN, and then possibly a MSN was more affordable, I would certainly change my mind on this issue.

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

5,144 Posts; 69,445 Profile Views

In addition, I submit to you the BSN requirement is a deck intrinsically stacked against rural students, middle income students (can't afford the price tag, wages too high for meaningful amounts of financial aid/subsidies/grants) and nontraditional students who are balancing work and family.

Of course it does! That is exactly the point and THE reason behind the "BSN only" push.

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Murse1975 has 4 years experience and specializes in Peds, psych.

11 Posts; 513 Profile Views

Most hospitals require a BSN degree upon hire now. Especially magnet hospitals. It's becoming a baseline necessity for RN's. Would be smart to acquire one. I started out with my ADN then did ADN to BSN. Now doing BSN to MSN.

Seeing a lot of this here in Indiana now too. No pay difference for acquiring one though, only marketability and getting into a different job.

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applesxoranges is a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

2,241 Posts; 15,538 Profile Views

I can at least attest that that was not the case for me. My program's 'fluff' courses were all STEM classes...with room for up to 3 electives, and experience working with the community/ higher acuity clinical placements.

I used my 'fluff' electives to take courses relevant to further education like statistics, organic chemistry, and a class about indigenous peoples. Not much I can do with that, right?

Please list your program curriculum.

Also, not sure why you are so proud about taking statistics. Statistics is being built into many associate degree programs.

A class about indigenous peoples. Yes, because nurses should be focused on that class. The exception may be if you are in Australia or in a handful of areas in the US. However, I propose that it shouldn't be a forced topic and instead the US should focus on pairing down unnecessary coursework from a bachelors program. In the US, the bachelors are too broad and are actually looked down in a lot of countries as being too broad and not enough coursework.

Realistically, the best thing that nurses could do to ensure higher wages is to limit the number of new graduates eligible to work. In my area, we have too many nursing schools.

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8 Posts; 273 Profile Views

This debate has been around for decades. Then we have a nursing shortage and everyone scrambles to get nurses educated. I started as an ADN 30 years ago, got my BSN 13 years ago, and am now pursuing my MSN as a Nurse Educator because I want the personal satisfaction. Many hospitals are now requiring ADN hires that are new grads to get their BSN within 5 years of hire. Experienced ADN level RNs are being grandfathered in. LPNs are being phased out of many hospitals and specialty areas. They seem to mainly work in ALF and nursing homes. Years ago we had "diploma nurses" who were not college grads per se, but they were some of the best nurses I ever worked with. They graduated and could walk into a unit from day one with a full assignment and take off running. Back then, the BSN nurses were only good for administrative work and charting. They had minimal clinical experience and were more into theories than actual patient care! It has improved greatly over the years, but I would still rather have 2 ADN RNs than 10 BSN RNs on a busy shift!! The ADN nurses who pursue their BSN also make awesome nurses! I did become a better nurse when I got my BSN because it does change the way you think and look at things from different perspectives. I went into it thinking it was just a bunch of theoretical nonsense, but I ended up learning a lot and it did change the way I practice for the better. I don't get paid any more, but I am hired faster than someone with just their ADN. I would recommend pursuing it just for the fact that it opens up more doors of opportunity and if you want to go to the CN III or CN IV levels, it is required. Education is never a waste.

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34 Posts; 1,373 Profile Views

There is always going to be a need for LPNs and ADNs. This fight has been going on for the almost 30 years I've been a nurse. Next topic

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CHESSIE has 30 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg, OR, Peds, Patient Education.

177 Posts; 6,451 Profile Views

I live in New England, where the vast majority of hospitals are BSN only. ADNs and LPNs are found in corrections, clinics, LTC, and home health.

I live in western New England, and granted, hospitals "prefer" BSN grads, but do hire ASN grads and LPNs, and all are hired for per diem positions. No nurse, LPN, ASN, BSN is given a commitment of hours. Until a position with an hourly commitment is vacated by retirement, or transfer to another area or hospital the nurse works per diem. This is for the sake of the all mighty dollar, as, of course, per diem positions have no health care benefits, earned time, or any credit for years of employment. Many years ago this hospital and others changed accrued vacation and sick time into "earned time." Meanwhile, units, with the exception of CCU and ICU, are working with dangerously low staffing. I will add that the top CEO of this facility must have to live very "frugally" on his one million dollar a year salary.

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BuckyBadgerRN has 4 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in HH, Peds, Rehab, Clinical.

3,520 Posts; 38,059 Profile Views

I live in in the Midwest and AM a nurse. Your information isn't entirely correct. Is this your experience as a nurse or are you posting here as a non nurse spouting things that your heard or read somewhere?

I live in the Midwest and LPN's are not recognized by hospitals and other facilities. I have read where they are slowly being phased out and career colleges will be discontinuing their LPN programs. Honestly, I think they should keep the LPN programs and discontinue medical assistant programs.

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NanikRN specializes in Oncology, Rehab, Public Health, Med Surg.

392 Posts; 7,840 Profile Views

Never going to happen. I was told this when I graduated as a LVN over 30 years ago.

Granted, job descrition has changed and There's not as many opportunities for the LVN.

But phase them out---nope

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

5,144 Posts; 69,445 Profile Views

Realistically, the best thing that nurses could do to ensure higher wages is to limit the number of new graduates eligible to work. In my area, we have too many nursing schools.

No, the best thing nurses can do to ensure higher wages is to organize into strong, politically active unions.

The supply of nurse graduates can be turned on and off like a faucet and is subject to political maneuvering.

With a couple strokes of a pen tens of thousands of well qualified, NCLEX passing RNs can be admitted to the country.

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168 Posts; 3,728 Profile Views

There is always going to be a need for LPNs and ADNs. This fight has been going on for the almost 30 years I've been a nurse. Next topic

The difference between now and 30 years ago is that more healthcare professions have raised their education level and expectations which are in some areas surpassing nurses. EBM and CMS are raising expectations for bedside care beyond the task mentality.

The next topic should be move on or move over. Medicine is not going to slow down its advancement for those who don't want to change with the times.

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832 Posts; 17,284 Profile Views

From an economic standpoint, it would be foolish to get rid of LPN's and non-BSN RN's.

The healthcare industry (businesses) will outlobby anyone, including the BON for any state for the continued education and use of LPN's and non-BSN RN's.

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