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Losing Hope.

Posted

Specializes in GYN/Med-Surg. Has 3 years experience.

I am starting to feel like I will never get a nursing job. Graduated May 2012 with my BSN and obtained RN in August. I did not seek employment right away due to many personal factors - I had just recently had a baby, had to finish nursing school,then my Air Force husband got orders to deploy to the Middle East. I was studying for the boards, meanwhile we had to move out of our apartment and our things into storage, then my husband deployed. I was left with our daughter and we stayed at my parents' house for the duration of the deployment. I realize that it is MY fault that I chose not to seek a job during this time, nor did I volunteer. My parents both work and aren't able to watch my daughter. I've been searching since December and have had several interviews - for pretty much all of the Tampa Bay area hospitals - and even 2nd interviews for some facilities. I have been turned down by all of them so far (6+) and the rejection emails keep coming for the RN positions I've applied for online. Seems like NO ONE will hire unless you have some experience or you apply to a New Grad/Clinical Nurse Resident program. Or unless you know someone and manage to get your foot in the door.

I should also mention that I have a disability in which I'm not able to speak on the telephone. I'm hearing impaired. I use a relay service to use the phone. Otherwise I communicate normally in person and without any sort of interpreters. I am very lucky. I know that working as an RN somewhere would require thinking out of the box in terms of accommodations for me, as well as support from the employer and staff. It sucks that they seem "afraid" of someone with a disability working as a nurse, and are "afraid" to try something different and think out of the box for once. They are looking after their own butts and are not willing to help out a new nurse. I have been nothing but successful in my life. I graduated nursing school with cum laude honors. Guess that doesn't matter. I worked as a nurse tech for about a year until I had my daughter - which I thought was a golden nugget on my resume. Also, at this point, I'm starting to wonder if the problem lies with my references as well. I've been told to keep re-applying, but what is that going to do? They already interviewed me and didn't want me, so why would they want me later on? And I've come to the conclusion that there is no such thing as the "nursing shortage"!! What a joke. Nursing schools are pumping out new nurses and there is no one willing to TRAIN them unless they have experience. I'm AT A LOSS as to what to do right now.

I have no words of wisdom. I just wanted to give you a Hug and praying that soon you will find that right job for you. it just is not fair that employers will not give new grads a chance. They can be just as good of a nurse as the next person.

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

Gosh, what a dilemma. I have no exact data, but based on my own experience, hospitals are becoming extremely reluctant to hire anyone that requires any sort of special treatment, no matter what it is. Since they're deluged with applicants, they can be very picky. Your inability to speak on the phone would probably be a deal-breaker for most inpatient settings because communication with physicians, families, and other departments is an important aspect of the job.

You may need to expand your Job Search to other areas such as physician offices, clinics, etc. in which there are others who can manage telephone communications for you.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

What types of jobs are you applying for? I hate to have to say it, but HouTx raises a good point. Staff nurses in acute care settings spend a lot of time on the phone -- and the information relayed by telephone can be critical -- and the speaker on the other end of the line can be flustered, in a hurry, have an accent, etc. The ability to communicate effectively and efficiently by telephone may be considered a necessary skill for many jobs.

Have you identified types of Nursing Jobs for which your issues with telephone use might not be a problem? That's how I would approach career planning, if I were in your situation. I would also volunteer and do as much as I could to meet nursing managers in face-to-face situations so that they could see that I had no problems communicating in face-to-face situations. How much of that sort of networking are you doing?

I say these things to be helpful, not hurtful. I have an inner ear problem that affects both my hearing and balance. And I have learned that there are some things that I am simply not well-suited for. Fortunately, I was already a nurse when my problems developed and I have been able to transition into a role in which my disabilities are not a big issue -- just a minor one. But your situation is different -- and you will probably have to make some adjustments to your career planning and job hunting strategies because of your disabilitiy. I wish you the best of luck.

Edited by llg

AFwife727, BSN, RN

Specializes in GYN/Med-Surg. Has 3 years experience.

Doctors' offices and clinics really only hire nurses with experience. Sounds like this is going to be nearly impossible. I'm on LinkedIn and I'm on there everyday trying to find people that might be good to network with but I think I've hit a wall at this point. Volunteering is a good idea but I have my daughter and my husband is active duty military so day care isn't an option unless I have a paying job. At this point I'm wondering if I made huge mistake choosing nursing.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

Could you find someone to swap baby-sitting chores with? She watches your kid for a few hours while you volunteer and you watch hers for a few in return. Or take in a little work (e.g. do a little housecleaning for someone ... go grocery shopping for them ... etc.) ... things you can do with your child ... to earn enough money to pay for a few hours of baby-sitting per week so that you can volunteer ocassionally and meet people face-to-face.

Online efforts are just not good enough. People rarely get hired because of online contact only. Face-to-face is particularly important in your case as you need to show that your hearing impairment does not interfer with your ability to communicate effectively in a work environment. After all you have invested in your nursing education ... don't waste it all by not investing a little more to get a job.

AFwife727, BSN, RN

Specializes in GYN/Med-Surg. Has 3 years experience.

Llg - thanks for your advice. I really appreciate it! I've actually gotten in touch with my state's vocational rehab dept and hopefully they can help me. I have an appt next week. You have a good point about the volunteering. I don't know any other moms here, which doesn't help either. I've also reached out to my former clinical leader to see if she has any contacts in nursing research or clinics. I haven't heard back since my last inquiry to her. Unfortunately I'm getting the feeling that she's avoiding me at this point. I did spend 5 years working my butt off in college to make honors. It would really upset me if I couldn't do anything with my degree so I'm going to do what I can to find something.

MissM.RN, BSN, RN

Has 2 years experience.

AFwife, I'm sorry for what you're going through. I hate to say, but I agree with previous posters - if you're not able to communicate by phone very well, then I doubt acute care is for you, and I know that most other types of jobs want that "perfect" two years of experience. Here's a shot: try local community health centers. I know someone in my former city who was a brand new grad, zero experience, and got a job doing triage - but she did use the phone a lot too, to talk with insurance companies. Also - try your state's disability review office. I used to work with some women who just reviewed medical records and made recommendations to the office's MD for approval/denial. And one of them worked from home! maybe that would be good for your daughter too! I really hope things start to improve for you.

Seems like you are trying to come up with more reasons why you are not working than you are trying to find a job.

Get creative. You dont have to work at just a hospital. What other facilities are in the area? Nursing Homes?

AFwife727, BSN, RN

Specializes in GYN/Med-Surg. Has 3 years experience.

Thanks for your words of advice. I've sent my resume to a staffing agency via a referral from a former recruiter there (Maxim staffing and home care) and I've put in 2 apps for a dialysis company that hires new grads. DaVita kidney care. I'm hopeful about that opportunity because I like what I'm reading about the company.

Just so you know I am an Army wife with a cochlear implant. Please check out Association of medical professionals with hearing loss (AMPHL). They have a fb group for support. There are tons of technology out there that can help you utilize the phone. Do you wear hearing aids? CI? Look at Captel. It captions telephone conversations for you. I don't use it but I've heard good things about it.

I personally don't have problems on the phone unless there's a lot of background noise or the volume isn't turned up. But, I have seen this so many times on AMPHL. There is also another organization called Exceptional Nurse. It's a group of nurses with disabilities. Check these two out. And the vocational rehab is an amazing thing to have. They will pay for special equipment to help you with your job. They offer a ton of services.

Please PM me if you have any other questions. I don't get on often but I will check back to serif you have other q's for me :)

Also one more thing... I know you said it's difficult to volunteer. But if you volunteer like 4 hours a week, it's so invaluable because you will meet so many ppl... Faster than LinkedIn and they actually see you perform. I've gotten job offers this way, I've turned them down but I still volunteer so that my résumé looks shiny and that I'm not sitting on my butt all day.

This experience would be worth spending the extra cash on daycare or a teenager sitter because in the end it will truly help you get a job. Another possibility, take some cert courses like EKG, ACLS, etc. so that you seem more hirable. Look at the VA. Apply to the jobs that say they require 2 years exp. even if you do not have it. Sometimes they make exceptions for the right candidates.

Stay positive you can do this

To AFwife727,

I am in the exact same boat as you. Graduated in 2012, licensed October, 2012. I haven't even gotten an interview yet! You are not alone. If you still haven't gotten a job by the time I leave this comment, good luck. Good lock to all of us new grads looking for jobs!

AFwife727, BSN, RN

Specializes in GYN/Med-Surg. Has 3 years experience.

Checking back in with you guys. I'm still not employed. Still sending out apps but not as diligently as I was before. Opportunities are fewer and farther in between now since I tapped out every single hospital in the bay area. Currently vocational rehab is working with me in order to get a job. They tell me that they can get employers to hire me (I still have to apply, interview, etc.) and voc rehab then pays my salary for 3 months - which is, I guess, an incentive for the employer to hire me. Also, voc rehab can obtain equipment that I would need in order to function on the job. They have recommended that I work in the home health (I don't agree with this - new grad=not comfortable with home health), doctor's office, or outpatient settings. I am sort of skeptical that they have such POWER to get employers to hire me, but I'm keeping my fingers crossed. I am really excited about the possibility of having my very own job (!) and putting my hard-earned 5 years of college to use.

calivianya, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

I think home health could be a great fit as a new grad if your assessment skills are very sharp. Most places would train you well, and you have to remember that if the people are well enough to be at home than at least they are mostly stable. I did a home health rotation in nursing school and it wasn't so bad. It's just the part about doing so much work off the clock that turned me off. I want to go HOME when I get home and not still be at work.

The only thing about home health is it requires a ton and a half of phone use. You have to call the patients the night before and make sure they know when you're coming, and you have to frequently call their doctor, the pharmacy, etc. because there is no one where you are who can help you right then or who can write prescriptions.

AFwife727, BSN, RN

Specializes in GYN/Med-Surg. Has 3 years experience.

Yeah, I'm pretty sure I don't want to do home health. I've been out of nursing for 1 yr and I don't feel comfortable when my assessment skills aren't as sharp.

AFwife727, BSN, RN

Specializes in GYN/Med-Surg. Has 3 years experience.

So.. it's been awhile. I have an interview Monday w/ this healthcare mgmt company. The 'clinical manager' found me on LinkedIn and sent a message. Asked if I knew any nurses who were looking for employment, or if I was still searching. They hire case mgmt RNs ('convenient' work from home positions), and occasionally quick learning new grads, according to the guy... But I can't help feeling odd about it and can't shake the feeling, as he said he's "in a heavy recruiting phase right now through August"... Maybe I feel weird because he found me on LinkedIn, but isn't that sometimes a sign that companies are desperate? But I'm desperate, too! Ugh, I don't know.