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Longing for Death

Posted
An Angel An Angel (New) New

Hi every body:

I have something to discuss today

you can agree or dissagree. It is a debate and u have the right to say your opinion.

the subject is:

" There is never any justification for terminating a patient's life."

actually my opinion is:

the pt has the right to live whatever his/her disease is. We can not terminate the life foe just prevent suffering. Life is created by God and the God only must decide hen it must end.

That is my opinion so what is yours.....

good luck:

An Angel

It depends. WE can't decide to terminate someone's life, because it is their life, not ours. But, if a patient decide he/she's in too much pain, it's their choice. As it is today with multi-culturalism, god doesn't mean much today, as we all have our own. Think about the losses: autonomy, self-respect and most of all, dignity. Would you love showing your rear end to just about anybody? I know I wouldn't. I might only be 23 and not much past behind me, but I know I will terminate my life if I have a critical illness. I believe that the value of life is influenced by the quality of that life.

I also believe that a patient has a right to die, if that this their choosing. My mother has MS and she already has her paperwork drawn up (living will, power of attorney, etc) She suffers enough already, when it is time for her body to stop working completely, she doesn't want to prolong it.

A

I would have to agree with the posters above me. Many Christians shun me for this opinion(because I am one)but, it has always been my opinion and I am sticking to it.

Here, patients have the right to die with as little physical pain as possible. If giving a pain med hastens death, that isn't considered "terminating" a patient's life.

No offense, but I think that "only God has the right to end a life" line is completely wrong if we are talking about people who are dying anyways. God didn't put anyone on a ventillator. God didn't create the meds we give. Man has interfered with the natural death process too much already.

RuthieRN2008

Specializes in Surgery - some medicine. Has 2 years experience.

This is a very delicate decision. I don't think we should judge if someone's life quality is not of quality any more because we cannot judge that. And as a nurse we have to be nonjudgemental. For sure, it is not a nice thing to have to show your rear end to anybody, but you can still feel gratitude and happiness. As long as they feel that, they have dignity in my eyes.

The quintessence is that it is the patient's decision.

bluesky, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ER. Has 4 years experience.

No offense, but I think that "only God has the right to end a life" line is completely wrong if we are talking about people who are dying anyways. God didn't put anyone on a ventillator. God didn't create the meds we give. Man has interfered with the natural death process too much already.

Gosh that is just soooooooo true. The catch is, that rare pt that you're just

positive is suffering uselessly and not going to make it who surprises everyone and makes it back to a normal life. I know it's rare, but worthy of consideration.

Gosh that is just soooooooo true. The catch is, that rare pt that you're just

positive is suffering uselessly and not going to make it who surprises everyone and makes it back to a normal life. I know it's rare, but worthy of consideration.

Hey, if they want to put themselves through all that I could care less. My only problem is when we decide for them.

Edited to add: and we do know some situations are without hope. Brain dead is brain dead.

mariedoreen

Specializes in Med-Surg. Has 3 years experience.

If the logic is that only God decides when life goes on and when it does not, then I would say we already interfere with this ALL THE TIME in our many varied, very successful attempts to prolong life.

Of course, the big argument is do we terminate life prematurely... I say no, WE as hcp's should not terminate life prematurely... but what about the patient? I live in Oregon, the state which passed the assisted suicide law in the late 90s. I did not vote for it, but since it passed I have done a lot of reading and a lot of talking to people with terminal illness, and the friends and family of people with terminal illnesses. I have come to a point where I have no desire to see the law inactivated.

Those with terminal illnesses are often terrified of the loss of control and the possibility that they will be in so much pain they will not be able to handle it. For those who choose to have it filled (it takes 3 doctors to verify that you are terminal with only 6 months to live) having that prescription (which cannot be administered by a hcp, it must be done by the patient themselves) available to them at any time should the situation become "too much" actually seems to have a calming effect. They are able to go one more day, and then one more because that reassurance of an "out" should they "need" it, lies close by. I have no interest in taking that away from people who should (IMO) have the right to control their own life and death.

I do personally believe that there is a lot going on in those final weeks and days and hours spiritually that is of great value, but I have no interest in legislating my personal religious beliefs and denying someone their choice on how they're going to pass away.

I personally could not contribute to, assist or promote ending a terminally ill patient's life. However, I would honor anyone's' request who refused life sustaining support in the first place and do my best to insure the best comfort care possible; because no one has the right to suffer or lose their dignity. I just personally could not live with the knowledge it was I who, for a lack of a better term "pulled the plug," or even suggested it for that matter. If in the future Doctor/Nurse assisted suicide for those terminally ill were to ever become legal in my state; I would have to admit, I just couldn't do it. Not that I couldn't hold a hand or take place in therapeutic communication. I just know I couldn't be the one to inject/administrate that final dose.

I strongly believe in not allowing health care workers to terminate a person's life. That is to actually do something to end the person's life. I had to do a debate in my senior biology class about this very topic. We were assigned a debate and assigned the side we were to take. It was supposed to open our minds to the possibility that our views weren't right. I was assigned the side of not allowing "doctor assisted suicide" which at the time was not my opinion. I felt it should be legalized. Doing that research and soul searching has changed my mind.

Now I am FIRMLY against patient's families that PROLONG the patient's life. It is so heartwrenching. When I did my clinical in the ICU, I saw an elderly woman come and visit her husband every day, insisting her husband get everything that could be done. This lasted the entire rotation, and then some. I still pray that that man couldn't feel a thing, or know at all what was going on. It was awful. How long can you watch a woman cry over her husband's lifeless body? I dreaded every day I had to go there. That poor man. Tubes everywhere, "procedures" galore.... he was in his 80's. What an undignified ending to a person's life. And his poor wife, who can really blame her? I can't, I don't even want to imagine what she was going through.

Basically I guess my view stands at, if it is absolutely positively your time to go, we shouldn't delay it. We should not make it come any faster though.

mariedoreen

Specializes in Med-Surg. Has 3 years experience.

I personally could not contribute to, assist or promote ending a terminally ill patient's life. However, I would honor anyone's' request who refused life sustaining support in the first place and do my best to insure the best comfort care possible; because no one has the right to suffer or lose their dignity. I just personally could not live with the knowledge it was I who, for a lack of a better term "pulled the plug," or even suggested it for that matter. If in the future Doctor/Nurse assisted suicide for those terminally ill were to ever become legal in my state; I would have to admit, I just couldn't do it. Not that I couldn't hold a hand or take place in therapeutic communication. I just know I couldn't be the one to inject/administrate that final dose.

That's one of the common myths about the assisted suicide act in Oregon. Health care professionals are not allowed to administer a "final dose." It is a liquid medication that the patient receives a prescription for and THEY have to self-administer, no one is allowed to do it for them. Doing so would be euthanasia. If the patient gets to a point where they are unable to self-administer, then it cannot be done.

live4today, RN

Specializes in Community Health Nurse.

I had a very good friend pass away yesterday. :crying2: He was on life support, and his family finally made the decision to let him go.

It is very hard to let a dying loved one go, so it is only natural for the family to hold on as long as they can. If it is the patient's wish to not be on life support at the end of his/her life, then that wish should be honored.

Having said that, I do NOT believe healthcare workers (or anyone else) should have the right to terminate another person's life even if it is the patient's wish.

We have taken death to the hospitals and glorified the process of dying. This I am opposed to. Patients who are terminally ill should be with their family in their own home environment where they can die naturally without medical intervention OTHER THAN pain relief and comfort.

I, personally, do not want to be placed on life support UNLESS it is being done for a temporary measure, and the docs know I will survive once I'm stronger. Otherwise, let me go be with my Lord! Earth isn't all that grand to hold on to anyway. Why choose to stay where suffering exist when I can go to a place where the sunrise is constant. :)

RainDreamer, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 13 years experience.

Are we talking about assisted suicide here? Or prolonging someone's life by artificial means? I'm not really sure what I believe about the assisted suicide. In my heart I just think it's wrong, but I know if I was in a lot of pain and dying I'd probably feel differently and would just want to die, but I can't say for sure. But as far as advance directives and such..... putting someone on a ventilator that has no desire to live, I don't agree with that. They should have every say in the matter ..... if they want everything done to keep them alive, then put them on the vent and everything else, but if they want to die, then let them die, it's not our decision.

RainDreamer, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 13 years experience.

I had a very good friend pass away yesterday. :crying2: He was on life support, and his family finally made the decision to let him go.

Cheerfuldoer - I'm so very sorry for your loss. (((((HUGS))))) for you.

I believe that if a patient has a living will, it should be honored. If they are suffering and there is no way their condition is going to improve back to a decent quality of life, then they should have to right to die in peace.

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

I believe that if a patient has a living will, it should be honored. If they are suffering and there is no way their condition is going to improve back to a decent quality of life, then they should have to right to die in peace.

Sums it up for me. If a patient or family chooses to withdraw all treatment, then I'm there to support that idea without judgement, even if it means the patient may die a little earlier than if we went through all kinds of heroics.

(On the other hand, I don't believe in aborting a pregnancy at any stage because that is a human being there. But I guess we're not going there. :))

Marie_LPN, RN, LPN, RN

Specializes in 5 yrs OR, ASU Pre-Op 2 yr. ER.

My answer is simple: i am not God, nor will i play God. Because i will one day answer for my actions.

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