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Living as an older individual with comorbidities

Disasters   (1,721 Views | 53 Replies)

Hillbilly RN has 49 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Now Retired- M/S and NICU Certified.

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You are reading page 2 of Living as an older individual with comorbidities. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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4 hours ago, Hillbilly RN said:

I am sorry you feel such animosity because I stated my feelings. I was just trying to communicate my anxiety and fear.

But those experiencing economic anxiety minimize the anxiety related to illness and death.  They don't assign as much value to anxiety over loss of health or life as they do to anxiety over loss of retail/consumer lifestyles. Of course, that group of Americans is a very small subset of the population.  The economy will not roar back to life because of maybe 15-20% of a region getting haircuts or going to the pub, etc. And more people aren't going to become more confident while the covidiots actively increase everyone's risk and the infection and death rates continue to climb. 

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A Hit With The Ladies has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Psych.

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I don't feel animosity. I am sorry about your predicament. But I am telling you to be realistic. After the Sept. 11th terrorist attacks, do you remember when we all had American flags on our cars? And the color-coded system for terrorist threat levels? Remember that we lived in a "post-9/11 world" and things would change forever?

Eventually peoples' fears and alarms subsided and we went back to normal. That's exactly what is going to happen with Coronavirus. In a few months I don't anticipate anyone still wearing masks in public. Now, you may wish for these social changes to be permanent, but they didn't become permanent in previous pandemics and they won't for this one.

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pixierose has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Neuro-ICU, psych, ED.

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1 hour ago, A Hit With The Ladies said:

I don't feel animosity. I am sorry about your predicament. But I am telling you to be realistic. After the Sept. 11th terrorist attacks, do you remember when we all had American flags on our cars? And the color-coded system for terrorist threat levels? Remember that we lived in a "post-9/11 world" and things would change forever?

Eventually peoples' fears and alarms subsided and we went back to normal. That's exactly what is going to happen with Coronavirus. In a few months I don't anticipate anyone still wearing masks in public. Now, you may wish for these social changes to be permanent, but they didn't become permanent in previous pandemics and they won't for this one.

If you want to start another thread, go for it. However, back off - this isn’t the thread for your blatant lack of respect and empathy. It takes a cold individual to discount the very real fear that someone may be experiencing, and for that you should be ashamed. 

To address your correlation between 9/11 and COVID-19 ... you can’t. One was a terrorist attack, the other a contagion where universal precautions are more than appropriate in keeping with patriotism and public safety, as well as to boast that economy. Maybe your “youth” forgets this, but as many of us who are now living through both? They are absolutely not the same.

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pixierose has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Neuro-ICU, psych, ED.

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7 hours ago, Hillbilly RN said:

I am sorry you feel such animosity because I stated my feelings. I was just trying to communicate my anxiety and fear.

Let’s move on ...

One of my coworkers passed away early on from COVID ... she didn’t have any comorbidities, and she was just so young (early 30’s). This was while I was still in the ED. Her death created so much fear and anxiety, not to mention that debilitating grief. I felt guilty for feeling “if she could die, what chance did I have, someone with MS who is also undergoing chemo?”

And then I feel guilty for not living every moment to the fullest. For being depressed. The things I’ve seen in the last few months ... they’re not pleasant. 

It’s been the little things to cling on to. Little moments of gratitude. And that hope that human brings are better than some represented here. I see most with masks. I see good things where I work. I see COVID patients get discharged. I hear Journey get blasted over the hospital loudspeakers a lot when someone is taken off a ventilator. And I see good news in the papers. So, hope.

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2 hours ago, A Hit With The Ladies said:

I don't feel animosity. I am sorry about your predicament. But I am telling you to be realistic. After the Sept. 11th terrorist attacks, do you remember when we all had American flags on our cars? And the color-coded system for terrorist threat levels? Remember that we lived in a "post-9/11 world" and things would change forever?

Eventually peoples' fears and alarms subsided and we went back to normal. That's exactly what is going to happen with Coronavirus. In a few months I don't anticipate anyone still wearing masks in public. Now, you may wish for these social changes to be permanent, but they didn't become permanent in previous pandemics and they won't for this one.

You tell people to be realistic and then make a completely unrealistic analogy to support your unscientific insistence that this pandemic will be behind us in a few months.  Perhaps you have a different definition for reality or realistic.  

It really doesn't help your argument to claim that anyone here or among the scientific experts is calling for permanent anything.  I'll remind you once again that hyperbole is a terrible defense of a weak argument and trying to put words in someone else's mouth is a rather obvious bit of desperate hyperbole. When one make incredible claims and statements their posts quickly lose any professional credibility. 

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Hillbilly RN has 49 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Now Retired- M/S and NICU Certified.

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1 hour ago, pixierose said:

Let’s move on ...

One of my coworkers passed away early on from COVID ... she didn’t have any comorbidities, and she was just so young (early 30’s). This was while I was still in the ED. Her death created so much fear and anxiety, not to mention that debilitating grief. I felt guilty for feeling “if she could die, what chance did I have, someone with MS who is also undergoing chemo?”

And then I feel guilty for not living every moment to the fullest. For being depressed. The things I’ve seen in the last few months ... they’re not pleasant. 

It’s been the little things to cling on to. Little moments of gratitude. And that hope that human brings are better than some represented here. I see most with masks. I see good things where I work. I see COVID patients get discharged. I hear Journey get blasted over the hospital loudspeakers a lot when someone is taken off a ventilator. And I see good news in the papers. So, hope.

My first wife died from complications of MS many years ago. The only treatment then was Betaseron which I made sure she was on. It was a very terrible time and I would not wish it on anyone. Please know I understand where you are coming from and will pray for you.

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pixierose has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Neuro-ICU, psych, ED.

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37 minutes ago, Hillbilly RN said:

My first wife died from complications of MS many years ago. The only treatment then was Betaseron which I made sure she was on. It was a very terrible time and I would not wish it on anyone. Please know I understand where you are coming from and will pray for you.

I’m so sorry for your loss.

Thank you for your prayers. 

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Marisette has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Registered Nurse.

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Hello Hillbilly RN

I understand the concern for your safety. I live in a large city and there are plenty of covididiots out there.  Many people don't wear mask, don't keep a social distance. I'm amazed when reportors question government about reopening churches, theaters, sports arenas, bars and restaurants. Will people really frequent high risk places if covid positive cases go up significantly?  I imagine the cost for medical care may be significant. I've heard of some states reopening everything, but enough time has not passed to see if cases go up.  How many people are really venturing out to participate in the "new normal"?

People somehow feel that the reopening means the virus is gone. It only means we have more hospital beds and ICU space and that the healthcare system should not be overwhelmed. No thanks, I will take a pass on that offer. There are no effective treatments for covid. Your wise to stay home.  

The social isolation is also depressing. I'm glad you shared your experience with us.  I think many people are feeling this, but people with comorbidities that are at most risk are feeling this more.  I hope there is a truly effective treatment soon. 

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hppygr8ful has 18 years experience as a ASN, RN, EMT-I and specializes in Psych, Addictions, Elder Care, L&D.

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8 hours ago, Hillbilly RN said:

You may feel caviller about what should happen but for those like me, Covid-19 is a death sentence. It is something that here to for was not something you lived with everyday. Because some covidiot decides that they will flaunt common sense and go out in public without a mask or social distancing, I will lose my life. As far as I can see, in the future, I will be in my N95 mask with gloves on so as to protect myself as best I can. I understand that life must go on but you say return to normal. The old definition of normal is not the same definition as the future normal. I hope you understand that.

The good news is that the CDC is now stating that the COVID-19 virus does not easily spread by surface contact so you don't need to wear an overcoat and gloves when you are out. The more we learn about this virus the less we have to fear it. I myself have comorbidities and my physician has told me not to wear gloves when I go out or at work as I am more likely to pick up other bugs and cross-contaminate everything I touch and be cross contaminated by other people's contacts. Face masks for sure as that is a sensible public health measure. I will continue to do so until it appears that we have reached herd immunity status. I'm not sure how this will be determined. I read a study from John's Hopkins University that stated there would have to be a 70% infection rate to achieve herd immunity and since as of April no country had more that 2%to 4% of their populations infected that's a long way to go.  Unless I am required by my employer or the law I will not allow myself to be vaccinated as I feel there will not have been time for accurate and complete testing of the long term consequences of said vaccine. I am generally a strong proponent of vaccinations although as a libertarian I don't believe people should not be forced into being vaccinated. 

Unlike "Hit With The Ladies." I don't see some vast Socialist conspiracy here but I fully support a careful and considered reopening of our economy which in some cases if it is done right will benefit everyone. One of the things being looked at here in California  is to markedly reduce class sizes in elementary through high school to bring class sizes of 30 down to 15. This will involve a lot of planning and possibly reopening shuttered schools but if it can be done our children will be better off for it. 

What I don't see the need for is to be wearing a mask when outside all the time. I went for a hike with my dogs today and carried a mask with me which I put on when I was about to encounter some one but otherwise enjoyed the fresh air. I will continue out of consideration of others to do this. 

Now the ramble has begun so off I go to my BBQ for Tri-tip and grilled veggies. 

Hppy. 

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Yes. Most of us a capable of following simple common sense precautions to achieve a common good.  And then we have an angry subset that gets lots of attention. Some of them will be the first to achieve herd immunity.  I hope the immunity is long term. 

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Hillbilly RN has 49 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Now Retired- M/S and NICU Certified.

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32 minutes ago, hppygr8ful said:

The good news is that the CDC is now stating that the COVID-19 virus does not easily spread by surface contact so you don't need to wear an overcoat and gloves when you are out. The more we learn about this virus the less we have to fear it. I myself have comorbidities and my physician has told me not to wear gloves when I go out or at work as I am more likely to pick up other bugs and cross-contaminate everything I touch and be cross contaminated by other people's contacts. Face masks for sure as that is a sensible public health measure. I will continue to do so until it appears that we have reached herd immunity status. I'm not sure how this will be determined. I read a study from John's Hopkins University that stated there would have to be a 70% infection rate to achieve herd immunity and since as of April no country had more that 2%to 4% of their populations infected that's a long way to go.  Unless I am required by my employer or the law I will not allow myself to be vaccinated as I feel there will not have been time for accurate and complete testing of the long term consequences of said vaccine. I am generally a strong proponent of vaccinations although as a libertarian I don't believe people should not be forced into being vaccinated. 

Unlike "Hit With The Ladies." I don't see some vast Socialist conspiracy here but I fully support a careful and considered reopening of our economy which in some cases if it is done right will benefit everyone. One of the things being looked at here in California  is to markedly reduce class sizes in elementary through high school to bring class sizes of 30 down to 15. This will involve a lot of planning and possibly reopening shuttered schools but if it can be done our children will be better off for it. 

What I don't see the need for is to be wearing a mask when outside all the time. I went for a hike with my dogs today and carried a mask with me which I put on when I was about to encounter some one but otherwise enjoyed the fresh air. I will continue out of consideration of others to do this. 

Now the ramble has begun so off I go to my BBQ for Tri-tip and grilled veggies. 

Hppy. 

I lived in CA for 53 years before moving here to NE TN. I lived in So Cal where it was all asphalt and concrete. I moved here to TN in 2002 because I met my future wife online. I was so lonely after my wife died that I could barely function. Here I have an 1.25 acres in a very small appalachian town. I tell people I have thousands of mouths to feed. I have squirrels galore, more bird types than I can count, I have deer, skunk, possum, fox, black bear and chipmunks. I sit quietly on patio and watch mother nature at it's best. This makes my retirement better than anything I could ever have imagined. I am a city boy and my wife is a born and bred country girl. She is so very protective of me and for this I am grateful. She says that she is so happy I no longer work in a hospital and I have to agree with her. You folks are now living in a world I could never have imagined. My hat is off to all of you. God Bless you all!!

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Trampledunderfoot has 2 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Corrections, Dementia/Alzheimer's.

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23 hours ago, A Hit With The Ladies said:

We already have done more than our fair share of thinking and quarantining for the immunocompromised folks for 2 entire months plus. It's up to them whether they want to keep quarantining or not. For the rest of us it's time to move on back to normal. 

Yes, I get your point.  Some should move on back to normal.  Go around without a mask, forget social distancing, pretend everything is okay.  Then you will find out how very wrong you are as you die off.

The caring, wise population will be left, relieved of your presence.  The world will be a more kind and compassionate place.

You're talking about evolution.  Survival of the fittest.  I get it.

 

Edited by dianah
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