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List of most commonly prescibed meds, please

Posted

Specializes in cardiac-telemetry, hospice, ICU. Has 6 years experience.

I am a humble 1st year student. I am asking all you practicing nurses for some help. I (for my own learning, not assignments) want to start a list of meds in a notebook. I will list them by brand and generic names, classification, etc. so I can get a jump start on next year. I am asking for you to simply post the names of meds that you encounter the most in day to day nursing, I will dig out the details from texts. I figure, why not start with the ones prescribed the most? Any help will be much appreciated!! Thanks :)

SlightlyMental_RN

Specializes in chemical dependency detox/psych.

I think that you'll need to narrow your focus a bit. Where will you be for your first clinicals? A nursing home? Med/surg? Labor and Delivery?

Stcroix, ASN, RN

Specializes in cardiac-telemetry, hospice, ICU. Has 6 years experience.

My first clinicals will be at med-surg, then neurology.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

This is going to vary hugely by specialty. I could list the meds I give day-to-day and non-BMT nurses will have probably never given any of them. I'll list a few here that seem to be common across the board, though.

Metoprolol, many beta blockers

Furosemide

Coreg

Bumetidine

Nitroglycerin

Lisinopril, many ACEi

Hydralazine

Metformin

Insulin- R, N, Humalog, Novolog, Apidra, Lantus

Percocet

Vicodin/Lortab

Hydromorphone

Oxycodone

Methadone

Morphine

Fentanyl

Ondansetron

Prochlorperazine

Metoclopramide

Prevacid/Protonix/Nexium/Prilosec/Acidphex/whatever your formulary PPI is

Zosyn

Vancomycin

Levaquin

Augmentin

Meropenem

Zithromax

Avelox

Benadryl

Ambien

Klonopin

Haldol

Alprazalam

Lorazepam

Albuterol/Xopenex

Advair

Duonebs

Prednisone (for EVERYTHING)

Methylprednisolone

Heparin

Lovenox/any Low molecular weight heparin

Aspirin

Plavix

Warfarin

Hmmmm...all I can think of right now. I'm sure others will add.

Let's not forget the always stimulating Senna and Bisacodyl!

Stcroix, ASN, RN

Specializes in cardiac-telemetry, hospice, ICU. Has 6 years experience.

Thanks guys, keep 'em coming!

MinnieMomRN

Specializes in Med-Surg; Telemetry; School Nurse pk-8.

Awesome list Blondie! Stcroix -- if you know what Blondie posted -- class, reason it is prescribed, adverse side effects, onset/peak (especially the insulins!) you will have a very good start. Also important is to think: when would this drug be held? Are there any particular labs that I need to review prior to giving? What about vital signs? Proceedures pending or that the patient has just completed? Many times drugs are ordered in the hospital simply because the patient had been on this drug at home, but you as the nurse have to think about each drug you are giving and whether it is appropriate at that time of administration. For example, the patient just had a positive guiac. Of course you call this result in to the MD, but it will be up to you to know whether you need to hold that coumadin and alert the MD that this order needs to be evaluated.

Tylenol

Ibuprofen 800mg

Vistaril

Ranitidine

Actos

Potassium supplements (K-dur)

Keflex

Colace

Restoril

Phenergan

That's an excellent list, and a good idea to get get ahead of the game. I would recommend when you make your med cards you pay attention to the Nursing Diagnoses, and Nursing Implications and Pt. Teaching/Education. These are things you will need to know, and what most clinical instructors care most about when you are about to administer a med.

Also, I like this site http://www.drugs.com/ for both consumer friendly information and healthcare provider information about meds.

Don't forget supplements and vitamins- some potentiate or negate med effects.

Vitamin K, B Complex, Folic Acid, Iron, Calcium, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Thiamin, Iodine, Garlic, Ginger, St. Johns Wort, Chamommile, Valerian.

A good place to start is learning the classes of medications first. For example, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, fluroquinilones, opioids, etc. Then, when you look a med up and are familiar with it's classification, you'll already know quite a bit about it, and will only need to focus on information specific to the drug.

It's much easier than trying to learn a bunch of specific drugs.

Stcroix, ASN, RN

Specializes in cardiac-telemetry, hospice, ICU. Has 6 years experience.

Thanks to everyone, more please!

Didn't see these, which I give a lot:

Miralax

Go-lytely

ampicillin

ceftriaxone

gentamicin

carafate

Morphine

Morphine

Morphine and

morphine...

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

Morphine

Morphine

Morphine and

morphine...

I didn't know you worked in Hospice.

Music in My Heart

Specializes in being a Credible Source. Has 10 years experience.

To blondy's excellent list I'll add a few that I give pretty regularly:

nifedipine

spironolactone

diltiazem

phenytoin

memantine

donepezil

If I were to do the same thing as you, where would I find how to classify them? I, too am interested in getting ahead of my peers so I am better able to focus on the really hard stuff.

What do yall think the best way to do this is? and OP, good job of thinking ahead! You and I should be friends...lol...

A good place to start is learning the classes of medications first. For example, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, fluroquinilones, opioids, etc. Then, when you look a med up and are familiar with it's classification, you'll already know quite a bit about it, and will only need to focus on information specific to the drug.

It's much easier than trying to learn a bunch of specific drugs.

where do I find the classes of medications? I think that sounds more like the way I think...