Letters after name? FNP, APRN, etc

Posted
by futureeastcoastNP futureeastcoastNP (Member)

I was just wondering, what dictates the letters after your name when you become an NP? I've noticed some NPs, even at the same practice, gave different letters. I have seen:

RN, APN

APRN

FNP

FNP-BC

NP

NP-C

is this state dictated??

In Kansas it's APRN. When I was in NM it was CNP.

The designation ending in C means the NP has taken their boards with and is credentialed by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP).

The designation ending in BC means the NP is certified by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and passed the ANCC boards.

Both are national certifying bodies and the NP can choose which exam he or she wishes to be certified by.

This is copied off of the Fitzgerald website:

The credentials for the American Certification Credentialing Center (ANCC) certified NPs is NP-BC preceded by a letter indicating the particular specialty,

- Family nurse practitioner: FNP-BC

- Adult nurse practitioner: ANP-BC

- Adult-gerontologic primary care NP: AGPCNP-BC

- Acute care nurse practitioner: ACNP-BC

- Adult-gerontologic acute care NP: AGACNP-BC

- Pediatric nurse practitioner (primary care): PNP-BC

- Gerontological nurse practitioner: GNP-BC

- Psychiatric and mental health nurse practitioner: PMHNP-BC

Here is an example of an ANCC-certified family nurse practitioner:

- Hugo Moreno, MS, FNP-BC

Family, adult-gerontologic, adult, and gerontologic nurse practitioners certified by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) are granted the designation of NP-C, or nurse practitioner-certified. Here is an example:

- Melissa Hammond, DNP, NP-C

The NP-C can be modified, if desired, to include a first letter consistent with area of certification such as a family NP using the designation FNP-C.

Edited by BostonRN13

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

Depends on which board exam you take. The ANCC grants the -BC titles. The AANP the generic NP-C. For example an FNP that board certifies via ANCC will be " Jon Doe FNP-BC" or via AANP would be "Jon Doe NP-C".

Most states require a specific official labeling such as APN, APRN, RN/NP, etc on official documents.

mzaur

Specializes in Mental Health.

So you have the choice of ANCC or AANP? This is rather confusing, lol. I don't get why there two certifying bodies. Is one viewed more favorably than the other?

Hmm,are you guys talking about FNP only? I'm looking at PMHNP certification and only see ANCC

Edited by mzaur

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

So you have the choice of ANCC or AANP? This is rather confusing' date=' lol. I don't get why there two certifying bodies. Is one viewed more favorably than the other? Hmm,are you guys talking about FNP only? I'm looking at PMHNP certification and only see ANCC[/quote']

Depending on what type of NP you are you have a choice. There are actually more than two national certifying bodies!

For those that overlap there is really no difference other than individual preference.

juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care, General Cardiology. Has 29 years experience.

In the clinical setting, the easiest way to avoid confusion is to use the state designated NP title. As Zenman already pointed out, each state has an official title for NP's from the simple letters NP to CNP to CRNP to ARNP. NP's should know what their official state title is. That title is what gives you the privilege to practice within scope as an NP in your state.

All other letters (such as national certification, degrees, specialty certification) may be used in other venues such as official memos and emails, when conducting a speaking engagement such as a CEU lecture, when authoring an article or research, etc.

There are many different national certification letters. There are 5 officially recognized national NP boards: AANP, ANCC, AACN, PNCB, and NCC. Each 5 have their own letters even for the same type of NP specialty (i.e. AGACNPC vs AGACNP-BC).

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juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care, General Cardiology. Has 29 years experience.

Actually the APRN Consensus Model goes further to state that one must legally represent oneself as APRN + the specific role (i.e., APRN, CNP or APRN, CRNA). The "C" is added to NP so all the roles start with a "C" (CNS, CRNA, CNM, CNP). This is #5 on the FAQ's below.

I personally haven't seen a change towards adopting this lingo in my state though implementation per the national organizations should begin 2015. Scope of practice including titling is an act of state legislation not easily changed by a national consensus.

http://www.nursingworld.org/DocumentVault/APRN-Resource-Section/APRN-Consensus-Model-FAQ.pdf

tryingtohaveitall

Specializes in PICU. Has 23 years experience.

And then if you are certified by PNCB it will be CPNP-AC or CPNP-PC.

Dr.Naija_Queen

Specializes in Pediatics, Family Practice. Has 8 years experience.

As previously mentioned, every state has an official title for NPs. ARNP, CNP, etc. After I passed my FNP exam, the ANCC sent me a pamphlet on how to list degrees, certifications, credentials and what not.