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Just found out my school has a low NCLEX passing rate... should I leave?

I signed up for this LPN school in NYC called Mildred Elley. I haven't started classes or anything like that yet, I just went today to fill out my application, signed a few papers, and meet with an admissions rep, I haven't put money down or anything. All they did was sign me up for the TEAS exam next month. Classes don't start until late March.

The main thing that attracted me to this school was the schedule flexibility which is extremely important because I work 4-12 and my supervisor doesn't care about being flexible even though he used to be a nursing student himself. Anyways, after I got home, I did some further reading about this place and learned that it has a low passing rate for the NCLEX-PN exam. In 2015, their rate was 59.3%. 2014 was 50%.

See here: NYS Nursing:Nursing Programs:PN NCLEX Results:2

pmabraham, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice, Palliative Care.

If you left, what are your other choices for schools? What are their pass rates?

If you left, what are your other choices for schools? What are their pass rates?

The only other option for me is a CUNY school. There's 4 of them near me: Medgar Evers (76.9% NCLEX), Laguardia (73% NCELX), Hostos (87.5% NCLEX), and Bronx Community College (100% NCLEX). All of which are low cost public schools and are eligible for tuition reimbursement from my union.

I already met with an advisor for the last one (BCC) who said I should have no problem getting in with my GPA (3.80). Thing is their program is in the evening, the same time that I go to work. So that's out.

Out of the remaining three, I heard that Laguardia might be a little flexible but I would have to speak with an advisor for further detail.

The school that I already signed up for (Mildred Elley) is a private school and the program normally costs $27,000 with books, tuition, etc. But with my transfer credits, that would bring it down to about $18,000. But the problem remains, their NCLEX pass rate sucks. Oh and the union I'm in said they will not cover tuition reimbursement for that school because of the low rate.

applesxoranges, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER.

Well, different levels of nursing school tend to have different types of people that attend them. This isn't true and this isn't scientific in the slightest. Usually, traditional BSN graduates are under 30 with no kids or have a great support system. ADN graduates are a mix and it is hard to really define them. Some were in their 20s. Some had a dozen kids and had to hang out in the library to study. Some were second degree students or older students like in their 40s-60s.

LPNs tend to be people who are working full-time and have kids with limited support system. When you have kids and are the person paying the bills/insurance, it is hard to find time to study. I started a LPN class briefly before switching to RN. It was older students and students with children. Not to mention that the LPN program was at a private institution that aimed to recruit students in lower income areas and those who had it paid for through their work or unemployment.

If I were you, I would avoid the private institution. That 20,000 is only 3k less than what I paid for my associates.

Double-Helix, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU.

Given that Mildred Elley is a for-profit school, neither the cost nor the pass rates are entirely surprising. It looks like you could complete the program at BCC for about half the cost.

What's your current job and what's holding you to this place of employment? Finding a new job that will work around a school schedule may be a better option.

Given that Mildred Elley is a for-profit school, neither the cost nor the pass rates are entirely surprising. It looks like you could complete the program at BCC for about half the cost.

What's your current job and what's holding you to this place of employment? Finding a new job that will work around a school schedule may be a better option.

Well its a union job they help pay for school. Most of it actually. And i need the money for my family and i. I make $23/hour. Good benefits too.

SopranoKris, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care.

I would speak to an admissions advisor at BCC to find out what your evening class schedule would be and then talk to your manager to see if there is a workable solution. Do NOT sink $20K + into a for-profit LPN program with a low pass rate. Do you really want to go in to debt (since your job won't pay for it) for something that you might not even be able to pass NCLEX? Not worth the risk.

Get a quality education. Sounds like BCC is quality with a 100% pass rate. There's usually a way to work around things. I would definitely arm yourself with all the info you need and then schedule a meeting with your manager.

Good luck :)

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

The LPN-to-ASN transition program that I completed had a 56 percent first-time NCLEX pass rate at the time I enrolled. I still passed NCLEX on my first attempt.

Though I don't recommend attending a school with chronically low NCLEX pass rates when there are other options, be mindful that NCLEX is a solo effort. Just because some classmates perform poorly doesn't mean you'll end up like them.

Bronx Community College (100% NCLEX).

I already met with an advisor for the last one (BCC) who said I should have no problem getting in with my GPA (3.80). Thing is their program is in the evening, the same time that I go to work. So that's out.

I don't know you, but I myself am not in a comfortable position in life to be picky about what I truly want. You spoke with an advisor who told you "You have no problem getting in". The key to being a real nurse when you graduate is passing your state board NCLEX. You listed the schools that have the pass rates. You want the one with the highest so you can get out of the life you're living now and become that RN you want to be. How badly do you want to be an RN? Badly? Or meh, I'm just doing it for the hell of it.

Like I said before, I don't know you, and I don't know your personal life but I myself...there are things I'm willing to do to get what I truly want. What I personally truly want is to no longer be unemployed and in college accruing debt. A BSN, which is what I'm going to school for, is what I truly want. My situation is very different from what most of society know about a college student and one day the VA might make a story about it but the point is do whatever you have to do to get where you need to be which is to be a nurse.

I'm not trying to offend but if you can't adapt to the reality of reaching your goal, that is a bullet you'll have to bite. And I say this to any student. If the OP has no kids, there are options the OP can do to adjust. I've done them. They're VERY dangerous but if the OP can get through it, it'll have been worth the sacrifice.

I'm not trying to offend but if you can't adapt to the reality of reaching your goal, that is a bullet you'll have to bite. And I say this to any student. If the OP has no kids, there are options the OP can do to adjust. I've done them. They're VERY dangerous but if the OP can get through it, it'll have been worth the sacrifice.

Dangerous in what way?

I have a 2 year old and an 18 yr old stepdaughter. My wife works as a cna. We make roughly the same salary.

Think i found a solution. Might be extreme but tell me what you guys think...

Theres a vocational school that offers lpn for $14k. Its ACEN accredited and my union sponsors it so they will help pay it. The hours are mon to fri 8am to 1pm for 3 semesters.

The catch? Its a 2 hour commute from where i work/live. Im in the bronx and this place is in long island. I dont have a car so it will be subway train plus LI railroad.

I would have to wake up 5am to be there by 8am. 5 days a week for 3 semesters.

Worth it?

umbdude, MSN, NP

Specializes in Psych/Mental Health.

I would leave that school because of the price and the fact that it's for-profit, but not for low pass rates.

As long as the school stays above the minimum pass rate to maintain its accreditation, I don't really care whether the pass rate is 75% or 100%. I know I'll pass regardless of the pass rates. Do I wish that my program would weed out the students who are constantly on the edge of failing? Sure. But in the end it doesn't affect me a whole lot.

What's the name of the school JSS? Is it Veeb? I get mix reviews about this school.

As for the schools passing rate, don't worry about it. I am also from the boroughs and had to travel to NJ in order to attend LPN school. My school also didn't have a good passing rate and I even had second thoughts about attending, but I sucked it up and attended anyway. The hours were great and I had a small child to attend to. I did well and passed the NCLEX PN with 85 questions on my first shot! Guess what, that was 4 years ago and some of my classmates didn't pass the NCLEX yet! Can't believe I've been working as a LPN for 4 years and some didn't even pass boards yet. As Someone else said, NCLEX is a solo effort. There's plenty of review courses you could take in order to help you for the NCLEX. I didn't take any review course, just did questions. Since then I've completed RN school and now waiting to test. For the NCLEX RN I am taking a few review courses and doing tons of questions. Don't let the passing rate stop you, that has nothing to do with you, just the other students who aren't learning/applying the information as they need to!

Good luck, feel free to PM me, I was once in your shoes and know the feeling.

What's the name of the school JSS? Is it Veeb? I get mix reviews about this school.

As for the schools passing rate, don't worry about it. I am also from the boroughs and had to travel to NJ in order to attend LPN school. My school also didn't have a good passing rate and I even had second thoughts about attending, but I sucked it up and attended anyway. The hours were great and I had a small child to attend to. I did well and passed the NCLEX PN with 85 questions on my first shot! Guess what, that was 4 years ago and some of my classmates didn't pass the NCLEX yet! Can't believe I've been working as a LPN for 4 years and some didn't even pass boards yet. As Someone else said, NCLEX is a solo effort. There's plenty of review courses you could take in order to help you for the NCLEX. I didn't take any review course, just did questions. Since then I've completed RN school and now waiting to test. For the NCLEX RN I am taking a few review courses and doing tons of questions. Don't let the passing rate stop you, that has nothing to do with you, just the other students who aren't learning/applying the information as they need to!

Good luck, feel free to PM me, I was once in your shoes and know the feeling.

Hi. I cant seem to find the pm option sorry. Maybe cuz im on mobile right now?

But what school did you attend for lpn? The one im considering is mildred elley. Not sure if this makes any difference but they are not ACEN/NLN they are ACICS.

To answer your question, yes its veeb and i decided no lol. I would spend more time traveling/ tired than studying.

Double-Helix, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU.

Hi. I cant seem to find the pm option sorry. Maybe cuz im on mobile right now?

PM only becomes available after you have accrued 15+ posts.

A 2 hour commute sounds awful! However, it's a relatively short term, and saves you quite a bit of money. If you think you could manage reading and/or typing on a laptop during that train ride, you could actually get most of your studying and homework done during your commute. That would mean that your time at home could be spent with your family. Whether it's realistic to get up so early and commute to class after working long hours, though, is a significant consideration.

PM only becomes available after you have accrued 15+ posts.

A 2 hour commute sounds awful! However, it's a relatively short term, and saves you quite a bit of money. If you think you could manage reading and/or typing on a laptop during that train ride, you could actually get most of your studying and homework done during your commute. That would mean that your time at home could be spent with your family. Whether it's realistic to get up so early and commute to class after working long hours, though, is a significant consideration.

Yes i was thinking that initially. But i would be getting up 5am. Attend class 8am to 1pm. Then work 3pm to 11:30pm. Arrive home by 12:20am. Then wake up at 5am. Rinse and repeat. Not sure about that lol. Of course, although i dont work 5 days straight, its still 5 days a week but broken up like 3 days on 1 day off 4 days on 2 days off.

You will spend more than 2 hours studying per day anyway, why not do it on the train? That said, I could never function on such a small amount of sleep. My schedule while in school was up around 4:30a, study for a few hours before class, in class till 1 or 2, then library or home to make dinner and relax, (depending on the day,) bed by 9p. 6 hours a day in the library on weekends. Yeah, I had no life for a few years. (But, I got all my prereqs done before I graduated from ADN and got my BSN in just a few months... worth the sacrifice for me.) I would NEVER invest in a for profit school again (been there, done that - look what happened to ITT tech students) but each person has their priorities. Mine was not going back into debt.

I went to an LVN school with a high passing rate. A private school. They wouldn't let anyone take the NCLEX until the school felt that the student was ready. Theyd enforce this by not sending in your transcripts. That's how they get such high passing rates, like Brooklyn College. Otherwise you'd get 50-70% passing rate if you just let everyone take it on their own.

Currently, I'm an RN with my BSN working med surg. What mattered most was the effort of a few good teachers. In my LVN program, we had some amazing teachers-- better than in my RN program. For profit or otherwise, who are the teachers? Have the clinical instructors had recent floor experience or have they been in a classroom or clinic for a long time?

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