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Jobs that accommodate school...gotta eat!

Specializes in Well baby nursery.

Does anyone know of jobs that a student can reasonably live off of while going to school? Part time;full time; legitimate work at home, etc. I realize many people think it's educational suicide to work at all while in nursing school. But some people gotta eat. :uhoh3:

I work weekend option at a nursing home. I work 12 hours on Friday nites and Sat. nites. They also have tuition reimbursment. Weekend option rates are usually the top rates for NA's. Not to mention the experience it gives you.

Good Luck

Lee D

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds.

Any job in which you have a fair amount of down time to study "on site" is an excellent choice: for instance, a librarian assistant, or a night-shift unit secretary.

In my area the hosps are very accommodating toward CNAs that are in nursing school.

casi, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC.

Try CNA in a nursing home/assisted living/hospital. I would ask straight out in the interview if they are flexable with students.

Just don't work where I do. They are slowly working at forcing us students out. Even though they can't keep RNs, they are forcing out those in school to become RNs.... hmmm.

Does anyone know of jobs that a student can reasonably live off of while going to school? Part time;full time; legitimate work at home, etc. I realize many people think it's educational suicide to work at all while in nursing school. But some people gotta eat. :uhoh3:

We all gotta eat hon. I work part-time for a construction company, some days I get to study some no. I have a couple of friends who work part-time in the office setting and get more time to study. You just have to be careful and it not interfere with your work or else the boss may not be too happy.

Good luck

I work at a tanning salon that is VERY understanding about school. When we are slow I am able to pull out my books and study as much as I want as long as everything is done with the store! I work 40 hours a week and still pull off a 4.0 GPA, so it is possible - you just have to find the right job and be dedicated. I would much rather not work at all because at times it does get stressful, but unfortunatly I have to pay my bills!! :mad:

I've been working from home for about 4 years now doing graphic and website design. It's been ideal for someone who really wanted to be home with her 3 very young children. I've been able to add to our income significantly, and I have fun with it and keep my brain active with things other than baby talk ;). I will be starting school this next quarter, to finish my pre-req's I started before our kids came along :D I work for a group that posts design 'projects' and the designers in the team can choose to participate or not. It will be ideal for me while trying to attend school. I also get referrals, and have decided to have one client at a time... if they want me bad enought they can wait til I have an opening, but I know I will not be able to handle more than that during school.

My parents actually think I should stick with what I'm doing now. It's productive, and really is a good fit for us right now, but I feel like the season has come to finish my nursing degree. My youngest will be in kindergarten soon, and I'm confident I can make it work with our family schedule. Also my husband is 100% on board, so that is awesome.

There are some legitimate ways to work from home, my only bit of advice would be to stay away from MLM's.

Good luck! :D

- Cindy

TexasPediRN

Specializes in Pediatrics Only.

Most hospitals are very accomodating to nurses aides or CNA's and personally, I think a hospital job is the best way to go while in nursing school. Most hospitals will hire you as a student nurse aide after 1 semester of experience.

Working PRN(per diem) was how I got through school- I chose my hours and days to work. Some weeks I could work 4 days a week, others 2. Some evenings I worked the full 8hr shift, sometimes I just worked a 4 hr shift.

Its also a benefit working in a hospital since you can practice your skills and you learn a lot of new things, like time management and interactions with more then 1 patient.

Good luck!

Just a thought from th other side of the coin. I am starting nursing school fall of 2006, taking my A&P class now. I will continue to work part-time for my current employer -UPS. If there is a United Parcel Service hub in your area like the one here in Iowa, you can work a shift of 4 hours prior to class or onn the midnight shift like me(11:00pm-3:00 am), earn good money, get a physical workout, get health benefits, and on my shift(earn $2,000 in college money each year to $10,000).

I can not afford to work for nothing. I have to support myself. My experience in the medical field has come through combat experience in Iraq and Afghanistan as a combat medic. I can handle anything life throws at me now.

So, hang tough.God will lead you to the answer but you have to put in some foowork first. Stay in touch and be dedicated to your vision.

I don't know if your school offers this, but my CC has a work study program.. When you apply for your financial aid, you fill out applications to various places around the college, such as the library, the ID place, ect... They let you work part-time hours depending on your course load... One lady that works in the ID place she said after the first two weeks of a semester she has virtually no customers so all she does is study

Hope that helps

I think any state/government ran college like a state university or community college has a work study program of some sort don't they? It's a federal program so I would imagine they do...

Kim O'Therapy, BSN, RN

Specializes in Onc/Hem, School/Community.

I feel your pain. I have finished my prereqs and should, hopefully, be starting the clinical aspect of my training Fall 2006. No one I have interviewed with wants to hire a CNA "just for the summer" and I could use the money. I was offered a Fri, Sat, Sun 11p-7a (a shift I've yet to work - I was always a CNA from 3-11) position; however, it is not temporary. Well, I could probably fit school in OK because the school I want to go to has a 3 year (part-time) clinical option. My fear is between school and work and trying to catch up on sleep - when will my kids or husband see me? Would I totally screw up my sleep patterns and bring my grades down? I don't know what to do anymore......all I know is that I want to get my BSN. Any advice would be appreciated. :)

Regards,

Kim

Waitress or bartender.

I did this all the way through my first degree (BA) and will continue until I start my accelerated program. If you get into the right restaurant you can make $100 a night easy. It sucks because I am always working weekends, but I gotta eat, too!

artistnurse

Specializes in Well baby nursery.

Work school sounds great. Only thing is, if you have bills to pay like, rent, gas, groceries. It doesnt pan out. They're normally like minimum wage jobs, right? If I'm going to be working part time, forget about it...unless anyone knows something different. Holla back.:imbar

You're best bet is always a hospital that wants to eventually hire you as an RN because they, more than anybody else, will understand what it takes to get through nursing school and the need for flexible hours. Other employers may be ok but, too many people in my class who work for employers other than hospitals have had problems with scheduling, etc.

:nurse:

I can understand where different people are coming from. Wouldnt it be nice if we got payed to study??? LOL I am in a situation now where I have to get a job because school has ended until August for me. I havent worked in over a year because I screwed my knee up big time and have had to have 4 surgeries on it and then was in school... now the knee is fixed and school is over! I was going to take my CNA class but the next available in my area is not until Feb and is 4 weeks long which means that I would not be working until mid March or so probably... and I havent met someone yet that would love to pamper and take care of me plus pay my bills while I go to school! LOL I just applied for a position as an ED tech at a local hospital though so we will see how that goes. I am hoping that maybe if I work from now until August when school starts again that I can either get enough money put aside where I will not have to work the first semester or perhaps I will be able to drop down to a PRN type position.

Good luck!

Alnee

My sister worked 16 hr. weekends as a ICU tech/unit clerk while in nursing school (7am-11pm). For two days of work she earned a decent living plus benefits. Monday-Friday was study time, although she did occasionally have some down time at work.

Hospitals can be very flexible, especially if they know they will get an RN at the end!

You're best bet is always a hospital that wants to eventually hire you as an RN because they, more than anybody else, will understand what it takes to get through nursing school and the need for flexible hours. Other employers may be ok but, too many people in my class who work for employers other than hospitals have had problems with scheduling, etc.

:nurse:

I like this idea. You will already get to know many of the people that work there and when the time comes to be hired, you will know what departments you like and ones that you want to avoid like the plague:eek:

I am currently in retail and HATE it! :angryfire The hours are great (9-2 on most days during the week and 9-5:30 on Saturdays) but I will be putting in my 2 weeks this Friday so that I can take a few more classes and be able to study.

Melody

I like this idea. You will already get to know many of the people that work there and when the time comes to be hired, you will know what departments you like and ones that you want to avoid like the plague:eek:

That's not the only advantage. A friend of mine was in serious danger of failing this last semester. Since she worked at a hospital that wants to hire her as an RN, she went to management and told them she needed the last month off .... because she really needed the time to study. The hospital did give her the time off and, because of this she made two A's on the last two tests which really pulled up her grades and helped her to pass.

I'm not saying that everybody can afford to take the last month of a semester off from work like she did, but there are times when students really need a lot of flexibility with nursing school. There's nothing worse than having to repeat a semester or, even, flunking out of the program because of work getting in the way of school.

This happened to another friend of mine who works for grocery store. She couldn't get the time off to study, and now she's out of the program. And once you flunk out, other nursing programs usually won't take you so, all of that time and effort with school was wasted for her.

:coollook:

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