Jump to content

had job offer but NM had "CONCERNS" about me, should I accept??

Posted

i'm a new grad who got an RN offer in the hospital I'm working in as a CNA. The potential manager called my manager for a reference and she told her that she has "concerns" about me regarding communication. Now The only instance I can think of was a miscommunication between my manager and her assistant manager who I have kept in touch with the whole time since she schedules people for work. In that situation I got an angry call from my manager stating that she was still my manager and that if I no longer wanted to work for her she could transfer me. Even though I have kept in touch her with asst manager, I guess that was not communicated to her. meanwhile she thinks I have NOT been working all this time, when in reality I have and have even been floated to other units because they did not need me. Apparently they have needed me and the asst. manager did not schedule me. anyway, that was cleared up. I guess she was also upset about the fact that there was a period in time that I haven't worked for a few months because I can only work on fridays and they don't need me on fridays. But I told them this in my interview! I feel like my manager had an overall bad impression of me and related that to the potential manager. SO now the potential manager has offerred me a position and I got an official offer from HR. if i take this job i would turn down my other one, but even though I got the official offer I am nervous that they will rescind it later. Can they do that? I want to call the manager and ask her again if she is completely comfortable with her decision to hire me, would that be too annoying of me? She said "i will take this chance with you, but you're gonna need to ask questions and be a part of the team, you can't be standoffish". I had no idea where this is comming from or what my manager told her but I have NEVER had issues with the ppl I worked with now my new manager will think I'm not a team player. I don't want to start off being already the trouble child, I don't think its fair to me. what should I do? I feel that now I have to prove myself and it is not fair to me.

CCL"Babe", BSN, RN

Specializes in pre hospital, ED, Cath Lab, Case Manager. Has 28 years experience.

If you have another offer I would go with that. Starting a new job in that situation could be placing yourself in a bad situation.

Altra, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency & Trauma/Adult ICU.

I feel that now I have to prove myself and it is not fair to me.

As a new nurse (or new employee in any field), it is indeed your job to prove yourself, to take advantage of the opportunity that's being given to you, to grow as a nurse and to contribute back to the organization. That will be case no matter where you work.

If you like the hospital and that particular unit and want to stay, then knowing exactly what communication issues caused problems for you will hopefully allow you to avoid a repeat of the same situation.

If at all possible, I would avoid working around this person. She could have gave you a new chance with your new career, but instead, she chose to be a jerk and ruin your name right from the start.

should i take the job? this new manager now thinks I'm not a team player, but said she would give me a chance. what would you do?

Altra, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency & Trauma/Adult ICU.

As with many things in life, it comes down to:

How bad do you want it?

Are you willing to perhaps bend over backwards to make sure you're viewed as a team player? Are you confident that you know exactly what went wrong in the previous situation so that you can avoid a repeat? Is this hospital/unit more desirable than other offers?

Only you can decide this.

As with many things in life, it comes down to:

How bad do you want it?

Are you willing to perhaps bend over backwards to make sure you're viewed as a team player? Are you confident that you know exactly what went wrong in the previous situation so that you can avoid a repeat? Is this hospital/unit more desirable than other offers?

Only you can decide this.

well, to be honest, my manager NEVER brought up any communication problems to me, so I don't know the answer to this question. I already accepted but is it reasonable for me to call the new manager and followup to see how comfortable she really is about hiring me? she said she would call my manager again. i just accepted today.

Yes, you should call and get this out of the way. Just be open and honest about how you feel. This person should understand that you have been very concerned about this, and you need to know. If may put your mind at rest. Then move on, because you have to keep yourself focused, there will be much to learn.

Altra, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency & Trauma/Adult ICU.

well, to be honest, my manager NEVER brought up any communication problems to me, so I don't know the answer to this question. I already accepted but is it reasonable for me to call the new manager and followup to see how comfortable she really is about hiring me? she said she would call my manager again. i just accepted today.

OK ... this is getting a little convoluted.

Should you accept???? You already did hon, and in my book that's a commitment. You can break it of course, it wouldn't be the first time in the history of the world that that has been done. But I would suggest you think about why you accepted it in the first place if you weren't sure.

From your other posts, I am getting a picture of a person very busily collecting job offers but having little internal direction. Stop, take a breath, and evaluate these offers methodically and seriously. Think carefully about your school clinical experiences. Are there certain disease processes or patient populations you were particularly interested in? Think about the non-clinical aspects of a job that are particularly important to you (location, type of hospital, etc.) Consider what you have been told about orientation for each of these positions. This is how you begin to plan a career.

Where ever you go, you may have to prove yourself. The nurse manager offering you the position said what said based on the only reference of you got. So if I were you and I really want this job, I will accept the offer and prove myself. In the long run, the mamager will come to know. However, if there is another offer with no issue, then take that one.

By the way, do you know that your ex manager had no right to give you a bad reference?

Goodluck

linzz

Specializes in Geriatrics, Med-Surg..

I think the post by MLOS is awesome. I really do think it is all about internal direction. It is a hard lesson to learn that you really do have to figure out what you want or have some other compelling reason to do what you want or need to do. It gives one focus and direction.

Where ever you go, you may have to prove yourself. The nurse manager offering you the position said what said based on the only reference of you got. So if I were you and I really want this job, I will accept the offer and prove myself. In the long run, the mamager will come to know. However, if there is another offer with no issue, then take that one.

By the way, do you know that your ex manager had no right to give you a bad reference?

Goodluck

No i had no idea. SInce it was the same hospital the manager interact regularly. The new manager just told me she was going to contact my current manager. Never really asked my permission, she just did it. This makes me mad but I guess there's nothing I can do about it now.

bluesky, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ER. Has 4 years experience.

No i had no idea. SInce it was the same hospital the manager interact regularly. The new manager just told me she was going to contact my current manager. Never really asked my permission, she just did it. This makes me mad but I guess there's nothing I can do about it now.

Listen. You need to GET OUT of that hospital ASAP unless you are vested with 5 yrs or more of experience there with many dependents. This experience you have had is merely your first taste of their abusiveness and lack of professionalism. Mark my words you are blessed for being shown their true colors early so you can get the heck out.

As a new grad, you can go to any other hospital in your area with recommendations from your school alone. Your old manager's behavior is not just a sign of poor character on her part... it is a clear indicator of an unhealthy nursing culture and management structure at that hospital. Please don't settle for a sick work environment like this.

Your current manager is probably mad at you for one major reason. When she hired you as a CNA for one shift a week or less, she felt she was guaranteeing herself a newgrad RN. If she is a real grade A hag, she probably tried to make you feel like she went on a limb for you. Now that you're leaving, her plan is botched and instead of supporting a brand new nurse in her profession, she is punishing you for protecting your carreer and your sanity. The fact that the new manager was not able to read what a first class beeyach the old one was AND, played on the old one's nasty behavior by making you feel lucky to even be considered is just INFURIATING to me. These are people you need to get away from.

As a new nurse full of hope and ambition, you are the jewel and the future of our beloved but ailing profession. Please don't let these people dampen your enthusiasm or your self-confidence. I am not just refering to the managers, by the way, if you know what I mean... ;)

Take care and please feel free to PM if you need any support.

You did accept the job offer. You were aware of the negative information the new manager had before accepting so I am not sure what the real issues are. You mentioned you had been a CNA, I have found it very difficult to rise above ones previous work station when working with people who knew me before. That is just a barrier to overcome. Are you hesitant because you recognize the potential problems? If you have an offer somewhere you are not known intimately, I'd go with that one. Assimilating a new career is challenging alone, don't add to it.

in your experiences, should my current manager have brought the issue up first with me sometime before now? or do they just spit these things out on reference calls? Nothing was mentioned in my evaluation. this kinda came out of left field for me.

You did accept the job offer. You were aware of the negative information the new manager had before accepting so I am not sure what the real issues are. You mentioned you had been a CNA, I have found it very difficult to rise above ones previous work station when working with people who knew me before. That is just a barrier to overcome. Are you hesitant because you recognize the potential problems? If you have an offer somewhere you are not known intimately, I'd go with that one. Assimilating a new career is challenging alone, don't add to it.

wells heres the story on that, she made me an official offer weeks prior and told me to think about it and get back to her. when I finally get back to her and asked if the offer was still good, she became hesitant and proceeded to tell me what my manager said. she knew very well that i had a family situation that I would turn down another job to take this one. She knew I was on a time crunch. She was sooo understanding about it and even tried to persuade me to chose her job. So when I called to check on the offer it kinda caught me off guard that she was potential going to rescind it. GOOD THING I HADN'T TURN DOWN MY OTHER OFFER YET! so about a minute after i got off the phone with her, HR called me with the details of my job. at this point I felt so lucky to even have been considered again, I didn't say no. also my current manager didn't know i was applying for this job, could that have been part of what she thinks is my communication issues? Would a manager be mad about that? many ppl applying for other jobs don't often tell their current managers they're looking for jobs, I preferred her not to know because frankly, i didn't think it was any of her business. Could that be a reason too?

If you were leaving your current employer I would suggest you speak to HR because your current manager violated several of your employee rights and the manager that you are moving to also violated confidences. Since you are staying, I would politely ask to speak with my current manager, saying what you stated in your post. I was shocked and concerned that you feel I have issues with communication. My performance review and past experience with you hasn't identified any problems. I really would appreciate your help in identifying issues I need to work on in my new position. As a new nurse, I hope my colleagues will be up front with me as problems surface so that my potential career goals will not be hampered.

This places her on notice that her peer violated her confidence and that you disagree with the information since your performance review failed to identify these concerns and that you are now a nursing colleague, and equal in the profession. Be professional, non accusing, matter of fact. The outcome will be an eye opener for you and will raise your self esteem as a competent nurse, worthy of new opportunities.

Altra, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency & Trauma/Adult ICU.

I have re-read the entire thread, and I disagree with those who say that the OP's rights were somehow violated or that the manager who was her NM while she was a CNA somehow did something improperly.

As I understand it, OP was an employee of the hospital who applied for a new RN position pending her graduation from nursing school. This is a common situation. It is an internal transfer, and there is no legal or other reason that I'm aware of that managers of various departments within one organization cannot communicate frankly about personnel matters as long as there is no discrimation as defined by local, state or federal law. (and that would be discrimination on the basis of race, gender, religious affilation ... etc.)

There seems to have been a situation in OP's past position as a CNA with confusion over scheduling. OP's nurse manager seems to perceive that at least part of the difficulty of that situation involved some lack of appropriate communication on the part of the OP. None of us here can possibly evaluate that - we weren't there, we don't know the details, and it's really not important at this point. NM has communicated her concern about OP's communication skills to the NM of the department who has extended an offer of an RN position to OP. That conversation was just that - one manager to another. There was no violation of any confidence that I can see. IMO, former NM simply said to new NM: "I've given OP positive performance reviews, however there was this situation which caused me concern." That is her perogative to do so. I know of no legal or ethical principle that she violated by doing so. New, potential NM has communicated to OP that she is willing to hire her, but has clearly advised OP that repeats of the previous situation, whatever the problem was, will not be viewed favorably.

OP seems to be disturbed by this, and seems to be weighing whether to accept this position or take another one at another hospital where she has no prior history and is therefore starting with a clean slate. That is the decision OP must make.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.