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itt tech scam?

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agills agills (New) New

i went to itt tech and i thought it was great then got home and was told it probably a scam? itt tech is giving me 25,000 for being a student another 10,000 for passing test to get in. NEED HELP!!!

I have read from others that people should generally avoid these itt tech schools because it costs a whole lot and yet its reputation isn't representative of what you get out of it. The other worry is will people be able to use their degree from the itt tech school? I remember skimming somewhere that employers may not like degrees from this institution. I'm not 100% sure on this but you need to be careful in reading the information and do search on AN for similar questions posted about itt tech schools.

i looked into it online and some people say avoid others say it good i just have mixed emotions about what to do

I've also heard both sides too.

Have you looked at other programs in your area especially adn and BSN programs? those should be more reliable generally than itt tech. Of the two, adn is cheaper BSN is probably more costly.

those programs may require an entrance exam but you have to check.

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

In general, it's good to avoid tech schools. They are known for holding people's ability to graduate until they pay for some expensive test, or for having high instructor turnover, making it nearly impossible to pass the classes, and for a lot of hidden fees. The classes are rarely transferable, so if you want to further your education down the road, you might be forced to start from scratch. Then there's the factor that dorkypanda mentioned- employers tend to avoid new hires from these schools. With how competitive the nursing market is right now (pretty cutthroat), you need every advantage you can get.

i want to become a rn. and yes i have applied to faulkner and bishop n virginia college

thank you i think imma just avoid it all together

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Have you looked into your local community college before going to ITT?

This program is a commercial school, which usually doesn't transfer to area universities in order to obtain a bachelors or even a graduate degree if one wants one in the future.

Before signing up for the program, what you need to do is find out what your area market is going for, and where they hire from-I'm sure it's from the local CC and universities before they choose ITT.

I suggest you do the most prudent thing and go the most reasonable route and start your studies at your local community college and go from there, it will save you a TON of money. :yes:

WookieeRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in PACU. Has 4 years experience.

Honestly, I am speaking from experience from an HR perspective off the record... We have a rule in our (non-nursing) department that we do not hire anyone with a degree from ITT Tech and other similar for profit schools because of concerns with adequate preparedness for the work force. We used to in the past, but we just weren't satisfied with the quality of candidates and had a lot of problems.

Your best bet would be to call local hospitals or other places you may want to work and see if they hire candidates from the schools you are looking at.

studentnursemon86

Specializes in ER/Emergency Behavioral Health.... Has 8+ years experience.

You are probably better off with a community college. If you got your LPN or RN from a tech school, some colleges won't accept credits from them if you want to further your education.

I looked into Lincoln Tech LPN program before deciding to go to a community college for the RN program because of that.

I can't help but wonder --- they are giving you 35k at the very start --- how much does the entire program cost??

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

I can't help but wonder --- they are giving you 35k at the very start --- how much does the entire program cost??

I wondered the same thing.

NurseGirl525, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

That is their "advisors" job. To make you feel like you hit the jackpot there. They aren't really advisors, they are salespeople trained to sell you a very expensive product and make you feel good about giving them $60,000 for an education that isn't really worth a whole lot. Itt tech is not accredited here and graduates are looked upon poorly. Also they wait until you are ready to graduate and tell you you owe them a bunch of money and will hold your degree.

The other thing to look at is their pass rate. The one here locally near me has a 75% pass rate on the NCLEX (these numbers can be found on your state nursing board website). This made me knock them off my list right away. That makes me think they aren't teaching you what you need to know to pass and be a good nurse. I am now looking at two schools that have at least a 95% pass rate. I know I will get my moneys worth! I also looked at how many of their students are getting hired after graduation. which means there is faith that their program is doing a good job.

The other thing to look at is their pass rate. The one here locally near me has a 75% pass rate on the NCLEX (these numbers can be found on your state nursing board website). This made me knock them off my list right away. That makes me think they aren't teaching you what you need to know to pass and be a good nurse. I am now looking at two schools that have at least a 95% pass rate. I know I will get my moneys worth! I also looked at how many of their students are getting hired after graduation. which means there is faith that their program is doing a good job.

When choosing a nursing school, you're really "hiring" them to do three things for you: 1) Teach you the basic skills you need to begin practice as a nurse; 2) Teach you the things you need to know to pass the NCLEX and get a license; and 3) Provide you with a degree that is respected enough for someone to give you a job. If a school you're thinking of "hiring" can't do all three, you should probably avoid it. An NCLEX pass rate of 75% is pretty dismal, meaning that you have a 1-in-4 chance of not being able to get a license. And if employers won't hire you because your degree is from "XYZ School of Nursing and Motorcycle Repair" you've just invested a whole lot of time, effort and money for nothing.

Just my $0.02. Your mileage may vary.

studentnursemon86

Specializes in ER/Emergency Behavioral Health.... Has 8+ years experience.

When choosing a nursing school, you're really "hiring" them to do three things for you: 1) Teach you the basic skills you need to begin practice as a nurse; 2) Teach you the things you need to know to pass the NCLEX and get a license; and 3) Provide you with a degree that is respected enough for someone to give you a job. If a school you're thinking of "hiring" can't do all three, you should probably avoid it. An NCLEX pass rate of 75% is pretty dismal, meaning that you have a 1-in-4 chance of not being able to get a license. And if employers won't hire you because your degree is from "XYZ School of Nursing and Motorcycle Repair" you've just invested a whole lot of time, effort and money for nothing.

Just my $0.02. Your mileage may vary.

YES! Here is a weird fact. I applied to two schools last year before choosing my community college. The third I never applied to because the deadline was after I got my acceptance letters.

One was PSU And the other was a community college. I'm not sure the exact percentage at the community college (which I now attend for nursing), but it is over 90%. PSU sent all prospective nursing students a letter staring they were under review and reviewing their curriculum due to their NCLEX pass rates; though I'm not sure what they are.

I chose the school with the better rating. Luckily, it also had the better price tag.

The other thing to look at is their pass rate. The one here locally near me has a 75% pass rate on the NCLEX (these numbers can be found on your state nursing board website).

Many times the 75% pass rate is very misleading, since the number of people from the school that actual took the test is very small. What is doesn't reflect is the high number of their students that were not allowed to take the test in the first place. That is, a large percentage of their students failed their exit exam or not allowed to take the exam because they had outstanding debt to the school.

As to the school giving $35K, the OP probably misunderstood what they were saying. That $35K might be actually Pell Grant and/or Student Loans that she is qualified for. There is so much bad press on this school that it amazes me that people are still signing up for various programs from this For-Profit School.

Very good point SoniaReb! I would like to see a lot of these schools post how many of their students pass the exit exams that are required. I know where my husband is going to school for his airplane mechanic license, this rate is really low! Out of his class of 30 only 2 have passed the exit exam for part one.

A lot of people may attend these schools because they don't require entry exams or pre-req prior to acceptance. Its easy to get in even though it costs an arm and a leg. They are also very structured. They tell you what you are taking to get your degree. I think a lot of community colleges need to follow that model a bit more and they would have a higher graduation rate (the one my husband is at is at 12% and that's sad!). A lot of people just sign up for classes and later find out they don't apply towards the major they want. Academic advising should be required for new students. The other scary part about these schools is we had a friend that attend EPCI and HALF of his credit wasn't transferable.