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Is there something wrong with me? Too much studying?

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So I'm just starting my third semester of a six semester ABSN program.  I really enjoy school, I like learning new things, I get satisfaction in good grades, and I like having as much knowledge as possible so I can do better as a student and in my career.  I work one per week per diem as an ER Tech and use that to try and further my knowledge as well.  If I'm not at clinical, lecture, or working, I'm at home studying.  I do spend evenings with my girlfriend cooking, playing games, watching movies, etc., and spend time during the day doing things with my dog.  My girlfriend and I occasionally go out to dinner, but right now while I'm in school, we don't go out and do much.  She's an RN and also teaches at a local nursing school, so she's equally as busy.  We're both content with the time we spend together and I'm happy with my level of "personal time."  

That being said, I have no problem waking up early and studying all day for 12-14 hours, then spending the evening with my girlfriend.  My classmates give me a lot of crap because they tell me I study too much, work too hard, don't have enough personal time, etc.  Is there something wrong with the routine I have?  Is this something I should change?  Was anyone else like me?

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Every person it different. If it is working for you AND your girlfriend, why change it?

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If you're moving forward and satisfied with your life/lifestyle right now then worrying about what these people say is one of those things for which life is too short. Personally I would give it more consideration if it were a loved one or close friend who expressed concern. Classmates/acquaintances, not so much.

OTOH, if their words bother you because you yourself are secretly not quite at peace with your current MO, then make some small adjustments. You do want to get in the habit now of having a work-life balance. Guard against letting your whole life, your personal identity and your self worth be solely defined by how excellently you can perform as a nurse (or any role/job). You'll thank yourself for that at some point.

Yes, lots of people have worked very hard and been studious and eager to excel in studies and careers. And sometimes people make comments like what you're hearing because they worry there could be something wrong with their own choices. Just do your thing and maintain balance while doing it.

Take care -

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Each person's studying requirement is individual. A person that is struggling may need more time to study to understand the concepts of the subject. But, a person that is doing well in class and understands the concepts of the subject should not be studying excessively. I had a classmate that I refused to be anywhere near prior to a test. She had studied excessively for the test, getting little sleep prior to the test, and asking rapid fire questions to other students prior to the start of the class. Her anxiety was through the roof and caused everyone within earshot to have heightened anxiety. She did well in nursing school and understood the material, but always had the fear that she was going to flunk the test because she felt that she wasn't studying enough.

 

Is there a reason that you feel the need to study for 12-14 hrs per day? What are you doing that consumes 12-14 hrs of your day?

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7 minutes ago, NICU Guy said:

Each person's studying requirement is individual. A person that is struggling may need more time to study to understand the concepts of the subject. But, a person that is doing well in class and understands the concepts of the subject should not be studying excessively. I had a classmate that I refused to be anywhere near prior to a test. She had studied excessively for the test, getting little sleep prior to the test, and asking rapid fire questions to other students prior to the start of the class. Her anxiety was through the roof and caused everyone within earshot to have heightened anxiety. She did well in nursing school and understood the material, but always had the fear that she was going to flunk the test because she felt that she wasn't studying enough.

 

Is there a reason that you feel the need to study for 12-14 hrs per day? What are you doing that consumes 12-14 hrs of your day?

I'm in clinical two days a week and lecture one day a week, so I don't study much, if at all, on those days.  The one day I work I study maybe 6 hours.  That leaves me with 3 days that I study about 12 hours.

My studying mainly consists of reading.  I like to try and read all of the assigned chapters, whereas I know a lot of other students don't even buy the textbooks and just rely on lecture and powerpoints.  I usually read the assigned chapters and make flashcards as I go through them.  Then once I'm done reading, I'll study the flashcards. I guess when I have 4-5 chapters to read a day that are 25-50 pages long, plus breaks and flashcards, it consumes quite a bit of my time.

It's been a lot of work, but I've been successful as I was within the top couple students of my 60 student cohort on every test last semester.

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To clarify, do you study 12 hrs total in those 3 days (4 hrs/day average) or 12 hrs each day? If you are studying 4 hrs per day, then that is reasonable. 12 hrs per day is excessive unless you are flunking.

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1 minute ago, NICU Guy said:

To clarify, do you study 12 hrs total in those 3 days (4 hrs/day average) or 12 hrs each day? If you are studying 4 hrs per day, then that is reasonable. 12 hrs per day is excessive unless you are flunking.

No, probably 12 hours each day, times 3 days a week.  I have straight A's so far two semesters in.

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As long as you have a balanced life and not putting an excessive amount of stress on you physical and mental well-being, then my opinion is that if it works for you, then keep doing what you are doing. Only make adjustments if something starts to be neglected (physical/mental/relationship).

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15 hours ago, WAboundSN said:

I like to try and read all of the assigned chapters, whereas I know a lot of other students don't even buy the textbooks and just rely on lecture and powerpoints.  I usually read the assigned chapters and make flashcards as I go through them.  Then once I'm done reading, I'll study the flashcards. I guess when I have 4-5 chapters to read a day that are 25-50 pages long, plus breaks and flashcards, it consumes quite a bit of my time.

You won't regret not doing the bare minimum. Some people have a tolerance for "getting by" and some don't. And some people are truly gifted enough to excel at something with minimal effort - but that doesn't seem to be nearly as common as people who are satisfied with minimal effort even though it leaves them with actual  minimal knowledge.

Meh. It takes all types. Don't try to dissect it too much. Put in whatever effort it takes you to get the results you want.

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You sound like you are comfortable with the material and not struggling in your classes. Are you satisfied with your current school-work-life balance? Is your partner okay with your current school-work-life balance? Are you able to cut back if you feel like you need to? Do you feel that your physical / mental health is suffering from how much time you spend studying?

If you feel that your study routine works for you, can cut back should  you need to (e.g. busy week in other parts of your life, or just needing to take a break), don't feel you are compromising physical or mental health or personal relationships - I probably wouldn't worry too much.

Everyone is different with how much time it takes them to learn material and personal degree of comfort with the material to feel they have "learned it well." Just as different people learn differently - some study by listening to recorded lectures while taking a run, others make flashcards, and others may draw pictures, we all have differing study habits.

I personally am not some one who can spend a whole 12 hour day reading and studying because after a certain point my brain fries and I stop retaining anything, but I can study a little bit every day and do well. If marathon study sessions 2-3 times a week work for you, then that is your routine, and I wouldn't focus too much on what others think of it.

 

 

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There is no such thing as "too much" studying. If you are getting good grades and this schedule works for you. I am like you, I have 3 semesters left in my program  and I study constantly. I love school and studying isn't really a chore for me so I also tend to study more than my classmates. I also work and have a fiance and a son so I know what you mean when you say that you sometimes feel as if I am spending to much time on studying. However that being said, I believe that as long as your extra studying is not negatively impacting any other aspects of your life than it is not an issue. 

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I like to study.  It genuinely makes me happy. I have changed my language from "I have to study" or "I need to study" to "I want to study" so that my family and friends understand that I'm not forcing myself to do anything.  

That being said, you obviously like to study also or you wouldn't be doing it so much.  So no, nothing is wrong with you.  You are fortunate to enjoy something that is also productive and not self-destructive.  Just be sure you carve out time for physical exercise as studying doesn't engage your body physically.  

As Sheryl Crow says "If it makes you happy, it can't be that bad."

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