Is Nursing Still a Good Profession?

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by RebeccaB RN BSN RebeccaB RN BSN (New)

Specializes in Case Management, Research, Med/Surg.

Is nursing still a good profession? Yes! Well...maybe? The thing about nursing is that it encompasses such a wide variety of work. I know a lot of nurses are leaving the field because of burn out. However, I would encourage them to contact a career advisor and to remember all the tears it took to get the license and degree before leaving for another field. There are some amazing opportunities in nursing that might take more effort to find but are worth the work.

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OUxPhys

OUxPhys, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology. Has 7 years experience. 1,202 Posts

Nursing is a great career choice as long as its not bedside. 

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 30 years experience. 32,349 Posts

On 5/20/2021 at 8:01 PM, morelostthanfound said:

Agree and disagree!  As a career nurse of almost thirty years (both of my parents are nurses also), I agree that nursing provides steady employment and many opportunities.  That being said, I can’t in good conscience recommend it as a career choice.  Consider CPA, engineers, IT analysts...; same approximate length of educational preparedness but much better working hours (no midnights, holidays, 3 AM call ins), no potential infectious body fluid exposure, no one dies based upon your actions/inaction.  Then there’s the matter of compensation-nurse’s salaries are totally out of step with the degree of liability inherent in nursing.  Just my opinion of course

I think I'm at this point as well where I wouldn't necessarily recommend it to anyone.   I'm 30 years in as well and it's not gotten any easier and in fact we're going through a critical shortage where I work and our ratios are debilitating and I'm finding myself burning out big time.  There is some relief on the horizon as new grads are coming, as well as our new owner isn't adverse to hiring travelers but it's rough right now.  Also in a year or two these new grads will move on and it starts over again.

That said, I've traveled the world, have a car, a home, and hopefully will retire in 8 years with a comfortable income and I was the one that made the choice to stay at the bedside with all it's stresses all these years when I could have moved on to something less stressful.

 

kdstarwrites, BSN, RN

Specializes in Nurse healthcare content writer and editor. Has 16 years experience. 1 Article; 3 Posts

Great article, and an important thing to talk about. I have experienced burnout and am very grateful there are many different avenues for nurses to take. You're right, so many tears. I just can't forget how much I have dedicated myself...can't let that go to the way-side. Thanks for sharing!

myoglobin

myoglobin, ASN, BSN, MSN

Specializes in ICU, trauma, neuro. Has 14 years experience. 1,453 Posts

I would argue that the best thing about nursing as a profession is that it is overall so difficult and even miserable (especially in acute care settings). It's the professional equivalent of working in a coal mind.  The job may suck, but there will usually be job openings even in times of high unemployment because people are always "looking to move" in to something less miserable.  Thus, if you can find peace with this eventuality you are likely to have long term, steady employment. Also, I found when I worked "bedside" that my job was often so miserable that it made the rest of my life (no matter how boring and miserable) a welcome nirvana to be savored on the days that I wasn't at work. Now that I work from home and earn 500% more, I appreciate my days off less and see all of the other faults in my existence much more.

RebeccaB RN BSN

Specializes in Case Management, Research, Med/Surg. 1 Article; 4 Posts

22 hours ago, myoglobin said:

I would argue that the best thing about nursing as a profession is that it is overall so difficult and even miserable (especially in acute care settings). It's the professional equivalent of working in a coal mind.  The job may suck, but there will usually be job openings even in times of high unemployment because people are always "looking to move" in to something less miserable.  Thus, if you can find peace with this eventuality you are likely to have long term, steady employment. Also, I found when I worked "bedside" that my job was often so miserable that it made the rest of my life (no matter how boring and miserable) a welcome nirvana to be savored on the days that I wasn't at work. Now that I work from home and earn 500% more, I appreciate my days off less and see all of the other faults in my existence much more.

I do have to agree, there is something to the exhaustion of working bedside where I did appreciate my days off more. I love my job now but I do feel like I am replaceable, when I worked at the hospital I had a bit of a "go ahead and fire me, good luck finding someone else" kind of attitude.  What work do you do now?

myoglobin

myoglobin, ASN, BSN, MSN

Specializes in ICU, trauma, neuro. Has 14 years experience. 1,453 Posts

3 hours ago, RebeccaB RN BSN said:

I do have to agree, there is something to the exhaustion of working bedside where I did appreciate my days off more. I love my job now but I do feel like I am replaceable, when I worked at the hospital I had a bit of a "go ahead and fire me, good luck finding someone else" kind of attitude.  What work do you do now?

I am a PMHNP. With ICU the job was so stressful that any day off was a minor experience in Nirvana. My "horizon" was never more than the following day or week at the most. Troubles related to retirement, future schooling were as distant as a vacation to Fiji for someone serving in a Siberian gulag. The privilege of "surviving" another shift was the only reward I expected or hoped for.