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Is my AMEDD recruiter telling me this to get me to join faster???

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Ok so I've done my research I'm not just wanting to join on a whim, I know what I want. So I'm graduating in 2013 with my BSN and wantto Jon the Army as a CO 2LT. Just to clarify the officers training program and questions about ROTC I tried contacting an AMEDD recruiter (which is difficult) when I finally did get in touch with one and told him of my plans he suggested I enroll in some kind of program for the last two yrs of my schooling which will put me at an E-5 student (inactive) which will give me a bonus of $10,000 and a $1,000/mo for the two years upon graduation I'd enter in as active duty as a CO 2LT. However if I do this I will not be entitled to an enlistment bonus and they will not pay for my schooling. The reason he is telling me to do this (or so he says) that there isn't a high enough demand for nurses and not a good chance of me being enlisted upon my graduation. However like I stated before I've done my homework and its my understanding that there is a VERY high demand for Army nurses. I am not just looking for a way to pay for school I plan on retiring from the Army (40+yrs) I want to serve my country and make a life For myself and my family. So please any feedback and/or information would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!!

SummerGarden, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ED, ICU, MS/MT, PCU, CM, House Sup, Frontline mgr. Has 13 years experience.

i do not know where you did your research on the demand by the army for nurses, but there is not a high demand for us right now in either the reserves or on active duty. thus your recruiter is telling you the truth. the rest of what you have written will be best answered by others on this forum. gl!

Thank you for replying to my post. Do you suggest I do as the recruiter is telling me to do? And do you know if the demand may rise by 2013?

SummerGarden, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ED, ICU, MS/MT, PCU, CM, House Sup, Frontline mgr. Has 13 years experience.

thank you for replying to my post. do you suggest i do as the recruiter is telling me to do?

no, i suggest that you wait and read the responses of the experienced army officers and former enlisted on this forum. you will get good advice. be patient, many are sleeping or getting off of work right now.:)

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 13 years experience.

And do you know if the demand may rise by 2013?

Let me polish my crystal ball ... um ... hmmmm. Future remains unclear. :D No, seriously .... it's a weird climate for nursing out there; everyone is feeling the pinch, to include the Armed Forces. Seems like fewer people are getting out or retiring right now, which decreases slots/positions for the rest of us. I can only hope things will improve by 2013! Right now there are some of us on this forum with experience, certs, etc., and we can only hope to be selected. It's much more competitive than it's been in previous years. My packet goes in next month. :)

My best advice is to work closely with your recruiter; if you're seriously about it, the sooner you start the process, the better!

midinphx

Specializes in ED. iCU, now add on PICU. Has 19 years experience.

I think the ROTC program is a good idea. That is an excellent commissioning source. You won't be waiting by the phones for the recruiter to tell you if you are in or not. That was is more secure. Go seek out the ROTC commander and see what he/she has to say.

LunahRN- Thanks for replying, and good luck to ya!!!

Midinphx- I was originally looking into the ROTC program, but my recruiter suggested not the ROTC but the ANCP.....and I can't find very much information on it. All I know is the give me a $10,000 bonus and $1,000 a month until I graduate and that while in school I will be in the Army as an inactive student E-5...other then that I have no idea what it is?

traumaRN1908, RN

Specializes in Emergency. Has 2 years experience.

I think ANCP stands for Army Nurse Commissioning Program. This I think may be changed to Army Enlisted Commissioning Program. This is a program enlisted soldiers apply to that allows them to complete Nursing education while being on an active duty status. They get pay and benefits and their job is to attend school only.

This program is only open to soldiers that are already enlisted, and even they have to apply to it. The same type of process that the people on this board are going through is what you will have to deal with until you know that you are accepted.

ROTC is a safer bet for you it almost guarantees (as long as you have satisfactory academic performance) you a spot in the army nurse corps. This to me sounds like a better option for you unless you are willing to stop going to school for a few years and you want to enlist right now. From what you said, I do not think that you are talking to an AMEDD Recruiter. Look up the closest office to your home address at goarmy.com.

Like an another poster said, I would go and talk to the ROTC cadre (instructors) at your school and see what they have to say. I am pretty sure that if you still have 2 years left, you can contract with them and you will finish your last 2 years of school, and then be able to be commissioned.

You may want to do some more research on the ANCP/AECP to be sure that my info was correct.

I think ANCP stands for Army Nurse Commissioning Program. This I think may be changed to Army Enlisted Commissioning Program. This is a program enlisted soldiers apply to that allows them to complete Nursing education while being on an active duty status. They get pay and benefits and their job is to attend school only.

This program is only open to soldiers that are already enlisted, and even they have to apply to it. The same type of process that the people on this board are going through is what you will have to deal with until you know that you are accepted.

ROTC is a safer bet for you it almost guarantees (as long as you have satisfactory academic performance) you a spot in the army nurse corps. This to me sounds like a better option for you unless you are willing to stop going to school for a few years and you want to enlist right now. From what you said, I do not think that you are talking to an AMEDD Recruiter. Look up the closest office to your home address at goarmy.com.

Like an another poster said, I would go and talk to the ROTC cadre (instructors) at your school and see what they have to say. I am pretty sure that if you still have 2 years left, you can contract with them and you will finish your last 2 years of school, and then be able to be commissioned.

You may want to do some more research on the ANCP/AECP to be sure that my info was correct.

No - wrong on both.

ANCP is army nurse candidate program. It is made for and only open to civilians... you can be accepted in it and begin benefits up to 24 months out from BSN graduation date. It is essentially a delayed commissioning program. It provides monthly stipend and bonus at completion in return for your service.

AECP is a completely different program, army enlisted commissioning program and only open to enlisted soldiers and they can go check PESRCOM messages for specifics.

Outside of those you have the direct commission to that of a nurse - which is what most folks here discuss.. for new grad nurses and experienced nurses... current supply/demand is now pretty much leaning towards experienced nurses..

Then there is ROTC which you can look into.. I wouldn't recommend for those who want to do nursing... AMEDD itself is almost a completely different Army from the Army itself.. many here can freely admit it - they usually have experience elsewhere in the Army.. Others might feel an Army nurse has gained all sorts of base line Soldier experience / tactics from their basic officer course.

The key ingredient in all of these routes is getting the BSN... obtain BSN, unless going ROTC or ANCP, I would plan to obtain civilian experience in case you are not selected - or plan to apply after gaining experience in order to be competitive.

One question: What's a CO 2LT? Haven't heard that term before.

And some words of advice: Its great you want to serve your country, but try not to paint the next forty years of your life at such an early stage. Alot of people join the military and realize it is not for them or their circumstances change and realize that family is now their priority. The military is a hard life; even as combat service support :D.

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 13 years experience.

I was thinking "CO" stood for commissioned officer, maybe? Certainly not commanding officer. :D

CO 2LT is Comissioned Officer second lutenient. And trust me this is what I want my whole family and a good chunk of friends are active duty. My family is my main priority, thus the reason to join. The military has great benefits and health insurance for the rest of my life. I am doing this for my family. Thanks though for your concern.

traumaRN1908, RN

Specializes in Emergency. Has 2 years experience.

No - wrong on both.

ANCP is army nurse candidate program. It is made for and only open to civilians... you can be accepted in it and begin benefits up to 24 months out from BSN graduation date. It is essentially a delayed commissioning program. It provides monthly stipend and bonus at completion in return for your service.

AECP is a completely different program, army enlisted commissioning program and only open to enlisted soldiers and they can go check PESRCOM messages for specifics.

Thanks for getting me straight. Was my description of the AECP wrong, or was I just wrong for interchanging the two?

No - wrong on both.

ANCP is army nurse candidate program. It is made for and only open to civilians... you can be accepted in it and begin benefits up to 24 months out from BSN graduation date. It is essentially a delayed commissioning program. It provides monthly stipend and bonus at completion in return for your service.

AECP is a completely different program, army enlisted commissioning program and only open to enlisted soldiers and they can go check PESRCOM messages for specifics.

Outside of those you have the direct commission to that of a nurse - which is what most folks here discuss.. for new grad nurses and experienced nurses... current supply/demand is now pretty much leaning towards experienced nurses..

Then there is ROTC which you can look into.. I wouldn't recommend for those who want to do nursing... AMEDD itself is almost a completely different Army from the Army itself.. many here can freely admit it - they usually have experience elsewhere in the Army.. Others might feel an Army nurse has gained all sorts of base line Soldier experience / tactics from their basic officer course.

The key ingredient in all of these routes is getting the BSN... obtain BSN, unless going ROTC or ANCP, I would plan to obtain civilian experience in case you are not selected - or plan to apply after gaining experience in order to be competitive.

Thanks for explaining this more in detail, this is what my recruiter was telling me about and even though they don't pay for school my tuition in one year will only be a little over $8,000 SO it will more then pay for my schooling. The only thing I was bummed about was not receiving an enlistment bonus.

true - but if you could get accepted into ANCP you have guaranteed employment upon graduation... that is something here I think some would be willing to trade for the 'bonus'.. plus remember bonuses are taxed... just makes your piece of mind feel so much more worth it.

That being said I"m not sure of the future of the ANCP.. best of luck.

I think they will continue to utilize the ANCP for the accession of new grad nurses...leaving the direct commission option for more experienced nurses... there will always be a need for replacement med/surg nurses, and new grads fit that bill.

Of course this is just my opinion, and have nothing formal to back it up.

CO 2LT is Comissioned Officer second lutenient. And trust me this is what I want my whole family and a good chunk of friends are active duty. My family is my main priority, thus the reason to join. The military has great benefits and health insurance for the rest of my life. I am doing this for my family. Thanks though for your concern.

Not to nitpick, but its not necessary to put "CO" in front of lieutenant; as all lieutenants are commissioned, its implied just by stating the rank. When you say "CO", it usually means a commanding officer, which not all officers are.

Do a little more research on the benefits aspect: service itself does not guarantee health-care benefits to the extent civilians believe.

Also, to stay forty years in the military is a bit of an stretch. While possible in some situations, the current draw down precludes most people from staying that long. Just remember in all cases that you will eventually reach the end of your usefulness to the military and will become a civilian again; use the military to further your personal goals, because they will definitely use you to reach theirs.

Not to nitpick, but its not necessary to put "CO" in front of lieutenant; as all lieutenants are commissioned, its implied just by stating the rank. When you say "CO", it usually means a commanding officer, which not all officers are.

Do a little more research on the benefits aspect: service itself does not guarantee health-care benefits to the extent civilians believe.

Also, to stay forty years in the military is a bit of an stretch. While possible in some situations, the current draw down precludes most people from staying that long. Just remember in all cases that you will eventually reach the end of your usefulness to the military and will become a civilian again; use the military to further your personal goals, because they will definitely use you to reach theirs.

I realize my mistake with CO, however I was just explaining what I meant by it, so my mistake. Also I know what benefits I will be eligible for as a civilian, as I have stated before not only do I have family that has served and is still serving, I have done my homework, and I know that I can benefit just as much if not more then they benefit from having me serve. Yes the benefits from retiring from the military will not compare to the benefits I receive while I'm serving on active duty, there still will be many benefits I will receive.