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just_cause

just_cause BSN, RN

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  1. just_cause

    Semi-informed question about military nursing...

    I don't believe OCS branches to nurse corp. nurse corp requires BSN. In addition OCS branch assignment is needs of the Army. Already looks like you have come to a decision but just FYI.
  2. just_cause

    Army or AF?!

    GS Nurse, aka Army Civilian Nurse. Perhaps this is a good compromise.
  3. just_cause

    New Army Nurse Corps officers: First Things First!

    The board does not view or have the option of viewing the actual PT score or weapons qualification score.
  4. just_cause

    Rank Questions

    My personal opinion is going in as an O2 has some benefits.. it allows you to get acclimated to the military environment, job billets geared towards clinical positions etc. If you go in as an O3 your chain of command, subordinates etc will see an O3 and despite if you are experienced or new to military they will expect an O3 and that is who you are rated against. If you go in as an O2 with constructive credit you can get acclimated and in a relatively short period of time be promoted. My 2 Cents.
  5. just_cause

    Rank Questions

    keep in mind regardless of constructive credit you need one year active duty before being eligible to submit for a board. so if you came in as a 1LT based on 40m constructive you'd still need 1 year active duty time before the next scheduled CPTS board (which has been conducted around april/may) in order to be eligible for that board. Best of luck
  6. just_cause

    Women in Combat Arm's Units

    I agree, lets make it fair. I'm from a combat arms background as well. First thing is to update the selective service act so it is mandatory for all females 18-30 to register and also eliminate that gender barrier. Then we can re-evaluate the public and political will behind this change and perhaps what is behind this political agenda.
  7. just_cause

    Women in Combat Arm's Units

    / /
  8. just_cause

    Med-Surg certification exam

    from my understanding critical care shows 18mo med surg exp required prior to course start.
  9. just_cause

    Med-Surg certification exam

    I'm on a med surg floor. Our section sponsors staff to go through the med surg prep course (funded by local unit) and then I will follow through to take the cert test. (at this time I'm not sure how funding works but happy to pay on my own). I've known several nurses to got o critical care course w/o med surg cert..however the timeline of those and the natural highly motivated folks applying to these courses normally have this cert in hand.
  10. Hi, I'm hoping to touch basis with someone picked up via LTHET last year in order to message and get some feedback from the process and to some specific questions. Thanks!
  11. just_cause

    LPN (or ADN RN) to Corpsman/Medic?

    Jeck, for the OP do you know if he went to basic then ait for combat medic then ait for LPN? Only note I would throw out is to look at the pre-reqs you have and maybe look at pre reqs for enlisted to officer BSN program and / or PA program as that way you might have an opportunity to finish or start those in your time waiting to ship to basic should you choose to enlist and then have those opportunities available to you at a later date. Best of luck.
  12. just_cause

    LPN (or ADN RN) to Corpsman/Medic?

    Combat Medic in the Army - you can enlist in. You will go to basic then the training to become a medic. Medics later on can apply to become an LPN after some additional schooling 52weeks. I know there is a recent MOS change so this is now a seperate MOS vs a MOS identifier. I know in the reserves some people were able to enlist to get the LPN identifier.. I'm not aware of it for active duty. Your post asks a specific question... That being said you might want to be more open to others critiquing your overall plan and asking or being receptive to advice rather then only replying to your question....
  13. Yeah.. I'm 'assuming' some enteral feeds were near by.. now why coffee was being added... is another mystery. Emphasis on student
  14. This is another example of how beneficial tubing / equipment is that helps prevent these types of mistakes~ http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/10/23/nurse-injected-lethal-dose-coffee-and-milk-into-patient-iv-drip/?intcmp=obnetwork An 80-year-old patient in a Rio de Janeiro clinic died after a student nurse accidentally injected coffee into her veins, Medical Daily reported. The nurse, 23-year-old Rejane Moreira Telles, defended her mistake in a television interview, saying "anyone can get confused."Telles had only three days of experience at the clinic before the incident. She accidentally administered an intravenous drip filled with coffee and milk to Palmerina Pires Riberio, who died hours after the fluid was injected in her body.According to Medical Daily, Telles told reporters she knew of the risks before administering the feed. However, she claimed she hadn't been trained in the procedure."As they [the feed and blood drips] were next to each other, anyone can get confused," Telles told Brazilian TV Globo's Fantastico. "I injected the coffee, and I put it in the wrong place."Telles, two nurses and another student have been indicted for manslaughter. Doctors told Globo's Fantastico that through the IV feed, the coffee would have traveled straight to Ribeiro's heart and lungs.Ribeiro's daughter, Loreni Ribeiro, said she witnessed the incident."I saw my mother was agitated, she opened her mouth, and this youngster put coffee with milk into the veins of my mother. Half a glass," Loreni said Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/10/23/nurse-injected-lethal-dose-coffee-and-milk-into-patient-iv-drip/?intcmp=obnetwork#ixzz2AuEalFfZ
  15. just_cause

    Allowing Corpsman to Become Nurses

    The role of combat medic and nurse are completely different role, skill set, scope, etc. The Army combat medic can apply to attend a 1-year long school to gain a skill identifier M6 where they then can get licensure to work as an LPN in military hospital setting. If you get out as a combat medic then you have a great application and the GI Bill where you can attend school to become a nurse if that is what you seek, or have a great foundation for PA application. I'm sorry how was corpsman pronounced this time? :)
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