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• initiating & implementing change

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The change process follows the same path as the nursing process: assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation.

Change is inevitable, if not always welcome.

Change is necessary for growth, although it often produces anxiety and fear.

In your own words, describe how you would answer a nurse who is resistant to change, when she says:

* No one else does it like that

* We don't have the time

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

Is this a homework assignment? If it is, most of us would prefer to hear YOUR ideas on the topic before we join a discussion. I am sure your instructor would prefer that you start with your own ideas, too.

Even if it is not a school assignment, it is better if you give us some of your ideas before expecting us to comment.

Farawyn

Has 25 years experience.

Are you and PittPhilly out having lunch together right now or something?

I'm a leadership and managment student and I post this question not to just give me the answers I already answered this question and I show my instructor and she tell me "post this question to any social media and wait for the response of other people and take the answers of others and compare it with your answers and learn from them because you're still young and you need the advice from anyone they have a good experience"

And this is my answer:

  • All of us we have a responsibilities and have a lot of things to be done it must be manage your time in a perfect way to differentiate or to put a limit for your work and any other things and when you manage your time it will be help yourself first and help the others to get more enough time to change to the better way. Me as a Nurse Leader I will participate in the Changing Process by Create a sense of urgency about the need for change – inspire staff to see the need for the change and make the change objectives real and relevant, Build a team to help guide the change – get the right people in place (skills, abilities and attitude) to make the change happen, Develop and communicate the change vision – a simple, clear strategy of what the change is and how the change will occur, Communicate for buy-In -involve as many people as possible, keep them informed and respond to their needs, Empower action – remove obstacles, provide feedback and reward progress, Create short-term wins – establish some easy to reach goals – manage the change in bite-size chunks, Don't let up – build and encourage determination and persistence – report on the progress, Make the change stick – this is the most challenging part of change -weave the change into the culture and practice in tangible ways.

Coffee Nurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 10 years experience.

I'm a leadership and managment student and I post this question not to just give me the answers I already answered this question and I show my instructor and she tell me "post this question to any social media and wait for the response of other people and take the answers of others and compare it with your answers and learn from them because you're still young and you need the advice from anyone they have a good experience"

And this is my answer:

  • All of us we have a responsibilities and have a lot of things to be done it must be manage your time in a perfect way to differentiate or to put a limit for your work and any other things and when you manage your time it will be help yourself first and help the others to get more enough time to change to the better way. Me as a Nurse Leader I will participate in the Changing Process by Create a sense of urgency about the need for change – inspire staff to see the need for the change and make the change objectives real and relevant, Build a team to help guide the change – get the right people in place (skills, abilities and attitude) to make the change happen, Develop and communicate the change vision – a simple, clear strategy of what the change is and how the change will occur, Communicate for buy-In -involve as many people as possible, keep them informed and respond to their needs, Empower action – remove obstacles, provide feedback and reward progress, Create short-term wins – establish some easy to reach goals – manage the change in bite-size chunks, Don't let up – build and encourage determination and persistence – report on the progress, Make the change stick – this is the most challenging part of change -weave the change into the culture and practice in tangible ways.

Tell your instructor that's a moronic suggestion, as she has no way to know who's responding to you on "social media" or what kind of experience they have, and whether it's real or fake. Tell her to stop farming her own job out to "social media."

Also, "your ideas" are so obviously cut-and-pasted from Emerging RN Leader articles, quoted below. I'll bet your faculty uses the same plagiarism-checking software I do.

http://www.emergingrnleader.com/why-is-change-so-hard/

The Role of the Nurse Leader in the Change Process

As a leader, reflecting on your own reaction to the change and what you are projecting to others is an important first step. You may be demonstrating resistance yourself in subtle ways that are both verbal and nonverbal. Leaders play a key role in framing the context of change for their staff. This is especially true in uncertain environments. You must help to manage change in a way that employees can cope with it. To be successful, change cannot be imposed but rather the leader should look for ways to enable and involve staff. John P. Kotter, a Harvard Business Professor, is a highly regarded expert in the field of change management. He proposes the following 8 step model that leaders can use to understand and manage change:

  1. Create a sense of urgency about the need for change – inspire staff to see the need for the change and make the change objectives real and relevant.
  2. Build a team to help guide the change – get the right people in place (skills, abilities and attitude) to make the change happen.
  3. Develop and communicate the change vision – a simple, clear strategy of what the change is and how the change will occur.
  4. Communicate for buy-In -involve as many people as possible, keep them informed and respond to their needs.
  5. Empower action – remove obstacles, provide feedback and reward progress.
  6. Create short-term wins – establish some easy to reach goals – manage the change in bite-size chunks.
  7. Don't let up – build and encourage determination and persistence – report on the progress.
  8. Make the change stick – this is the most challenging part of change -weave the change into the culture and practice in tangible ways.

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

Kudos, GrnTea.

Altra, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency & Trauma/Adult ICU.

I have been highly skeptical of the notion that nursing faculty are encouraging the gathering of internet opinions as academic work - I have assumed that it is an extremely unfortunate student misinterpretation of the concept of research.

But if there are faculty out there that are actually encouraging this ... maybe so that they can lay claim to "incorporating technology" into lesson plans ... I beg you to stop. Please!

BrandonLPN, LPN

Has 5 years experience.

If they're encouraging students to do their research via social media, I doubt they're making much effort to screen for plagiarism.