another ivy tech post - page 2

i'm about ready to just go to Bethel. Its my first choice but really expensive. Ivy Tech just seems very hard to get into. I just found out they have changed thir general education requirements to... Read More

  1. by   takapahaRN
    I'm curious as to which campuses are the most difficult to get into, and which have the most applicants.
    It just seems strange to me that if they have SO many applicants, that they don't expand the program to take more applicants each semester. It's about money for them! If they are turing away over 100 students each semester, that is over (roughly) $130,000 in tuition PER SEMESTER they are losing out on.
  2. by   LovesDisney
    Quote from takapahaRN
    I think it will end up running you quite a bit more than that. I'm taking 4 pre-req's right now at Ivy Tech-Valpo, and my tuition for this semester alone was $1100. That did not include over $500 in books. That is the cost for 3 credit classes, too. It gets more expensive in the ASN program with 4, 5, and 6 credit classes.
    I think that is in the ball park. The clinicals are about 10 hours/semester for 4 semesters, at around $100/hour that would be $4000, right? Plus lab fees and books of course.

    Please let me know if this is way off! :wink2:
  3. by   ljohnsonjr
    I went to the information session at the Indy campus, and even though they only 70 for the fall this year, they also had a grant for night classes. Next year they said maybe 30 for spring '07 and then maybe 60 by fall '07 after the students that are currently following the "old" program graduate they will be able to accept MORE into the nursing program. I am only going part-time and won't apply for nursing until january '08 and they are hoping by that time they will be able to accept 60 to 90 people.

    They had 175 applicants for the fall of '06 and accepted 70, if you don't get into the ASN program they send you an app. for the LPN track.

    I also have a B in English and the advisor told me not to retake it and hopefully will just do good in the other 3 classes and it shouldn't make too much of a difference since they will be able to take more students in the years to come. But I am also only going part-time!
  4. by   CantWait2Nurse
    does anyone know any lpn programs that are easier to get into, or one with less applicants? i tried to get into the indianapolis-lawrence program but that all situation was stressful so i just started looking for alternate schools. i heard that the ivy tech anderson campus is easier to get into for their rn program. has anyone else heard that or has anyone been through the program and can confirm this? i live in indianapolis but i will frive for a nursing program.
  5. by   BernieRN
    Ivy SB criteria:
    region of residence:
    in region 3 points
    out of region 0 points

    pre req credits:
    Eng 111
    Psy 101
    ANP 101
    ANP 102

    A 30 points
    B 20 points
    c 10 points.

    Teas score IF benchmarks are met. They are:
    Reading 80%
    Math 60%
    Science 60%
    English 70%

    ITCC credit: to be used as a tie breaker only (1 point for each prerequisite course taken at ITCC if this is considered).

    Effective date: January 2007

    There ya have it.
  6. by   WickedRedRN
    Quote from cantwait2nurse
    does anyone know any lpn programs that are easier to get into, or one with less applicants? i tried to get into the indianapolis-lawrence program but that all situation was stressful so i just started looking for alternate schools. i heard that the ivy tech anderson campus is easier to get into for their rn program. has anyone else heard that or has anyone been through the program and can confirm this? i live in indianapolis but i will frive for a nursing program.

    try looking at ivy tech in columbus. i believe they are still competitive to get into (as are all campuses). but i live in indy and choose to go to columbus for my lpn. it has been a wonderfully supportive program and i don't regret my decision for a moment, even with the spike in gas prices :wink2:
  7. by   TenebreKraa
    I am currently in the LPN program at Ivy Tech in Kokomo. You are right that they just changed the curriculum. Now you only have to have 4 pre requistes done but the other classes are considered co requistes to get into the RN program. I would suggest having your pre reqs and co reqs done because no matter how good you do on the TEAS test they are more apt to take those that have their other classes done. There is also a point awarding scale based on what grade you get in those classes. The more points you have the higher up on the list you are to get in the program. They have also started accepting students twice a year instead of once, so if you don't get in you don't have to wait a whole year to try again. I am doing the LPN transition to RN program. If you need to know anything else let me know.
  8. by   Pat_Pat RN
    I am currently in the ASN program in Bloomington. I have heard that they are changing the program in 2007. I believe what you are saying about the RN and LPN classes being the same, my instructors said something about that a couple of weeks ago.
    Pat
  9. by   Pat_Pat RN
    Quote from takapahaRN
    It just seems strange to me that if they have SO many applicants, that they don't expand the program to take more applicants each semester. It's about money for them! If they are turing away over 100 students each semester, that is over (roughly) $130,000 in tuition PER SEMESTER they are losing out on.
    The bottleneck is clinical space, and instructors.
  10. by   Ceteris Paribus
    I just got into the Indianapolis ASN class which starts in Jan 2007. I don't know how many applicants there were for this class. My GPA was 4.0 (actually 3.75 overall but 4.0 in the four courses they considered) and my TEAS composite score was 88 (which according to the stats provided placed me in the 98th percentile nationally, but only the 97th percentile of Ivy Tech applicants). Unfortunately, I was not given my "rank" so I don't know how many (if any) applicants were accepted who had lower scores than mine. I actually asked at the information session which I attended in March what the lowest score accepted was (in terms of points) in some of their previous classes, but they refused to answer this question (which I believe to be unfortunate since such information would be really useful for applicants, and furthermore this type of information is commonly available for medical/law schools et. ie. average LSAT, MCAT and GPA's accepted).
  11. by   bethin
    This year I decided I would apply to nsg school at different nearby campuses. I inquired to these campuses in Feb. and was told at every single one that they didn't even have any open test dates. Also, every campus is different regarding dates, requirements, etc. I was so mad that I quit and will be attending Marian in Jan. I was told by plenty of coworkers that if you make good grades (luckily I have a 3.5) that you will make it in. Sure, the school is private and very expensive, but at Ivy Tech I was treading water. I had all my prereqs done and have been waiting for admission into nsg school for 2 years. I'm not getting any younger so I switched. Marian and U of I both have 2 year ASN programs.

    You would think that every Ivy Tech would be the same, but their not. I loved the teachers. I went to Ball State before Ivy Tech and felt the professors didn't care. They were there for their egos only. Teachers at Ivy Tech actually cared and listened. Overall, I feel my education was much better there than at Ball State.
  12. by   Ceteris Paribus
    Well you make some good points:
    a. Your TEAS test in Indy (which is always open M-F basically 9-4 PM although you must arrive by about 1PM to test) will count at ANY Ivy Tech campus.

    b. I have found MOST requirements to be the same, but there are some differences. Specifically, I found that some of the Ivy Tech campuses (Muncie, and Columbus) told me that my Science prerequisites were good for only FIVE years not the ten that Ivy Tech Indianapolis will take. If you are willing and able to commute you could exponentially improve your odds by applying not only to Indianapolis, but also Richmond, Muncie, Columbus, Bloomington, Kokomo, and Terre Haute.

    c. How can you afford Marion College? I considered U of I, but it was going to cost me 18K per year OUT OF POCKET not including books (that's after loans and other Fin aide).

    d. I think that Ivy Tech Indianapolis overrelies on the TEAS test. Essentially, to be a successful applicant you need scores that put you in the top 5% of all test takers. I believe that this especially discriminates against minority applicants and may serve as the basis for a lawsuit in the future (there is a theory in equity/ affirmative action law known as "disparate impact" which essentially states that a policy which results in substanially fewer minorities can be discriminatory and actionable EVEN if that is not the intent). I noticed at the information session that probably 30 to 40% of attendees were minorities, and I will be interested to see on Nov 9th (when our class first meets for an information session) how many of these applicants were accepted. I have no problem in using something like the TEAS as one part of a larger process it is the overreliance upon the test (it essentially makes up about 50% of the points in the admission process) to which I object. It would be better to look at more than four prerequisite classes as well as to consider adding an interview/essay component to the admission process (as they already do for the RT and Rad Tech programs).

    e. Also you might consider the LPN program at Ivy Tech. It is easier to get into and you will be out in a year earning money (I personally know an LPN who works in home health and earns 80K per year with overtime). Also the LPN/ASN bridge program is much less competitive since you are only competing with other LPN's for the spots.
  13. by   bethin
    Quote from Ceteris Paribus
    c. How can you afford Marion College? I considered U of I, but it was going to cost me 18K per year OUT OF POCKET not including books (that's after loans and other Fin aide).


    e. Also you might consider the LPN program at Ivy Tech. It is easier to get into and you will be out in a year earning money (I personally know an LPN who works in home health and earns 80K per year with overtime). Also the LPN/ASN bridge program is much less competitive since you are only competing with other LPN's for the spots.
    I'm assuming your questions were directed at me. :spin: Honestly, years ago I would say I would never attend a college that cost 20k a year. I applied for financial aid and received ALOT in grants and that cut the cost in half (basically 10k, the same I was paying at BSU) and the other half I'll take out in loans. I'm single, working as an aide so I do not have much of an income. Plus, I am lucky - my grandparents left me money so I can pay for books, gas, etc while working PT. God bless them.

    I tried the LPN program at Ivy Tech. When I called all the nearby campuses, I inquired about LPN and RN programs. Each campus was different, esp btw Lawrenceburg and Madison. I couldn't get a test date in Feb for either LPN or RN. That's when I decided enough is enough. I've been taking BS classes at Ivy Tech just to keep sharp on studying. I would gladly do LPN first but at the Ivy Tech campuses near me it is very competitive. I live 2 hours from Indy, 2 hours from Cincy so that puts me in the middle of nowhere. I have to think of that when it comes time for clinicals. I had been attending Columbus, by far the closest campus.

    It's going to be hard. Really hard. I've already had panic attacks thinking of the money I will owe. But I want nothing more than a degree and I can't put a price on that. Like I said, I'm single so I don't have to worry about husbands and feeding and clothing kids. I figured it out and I would make enough as a new grad to pay back the loans.

    I actually was going to attend U of I this fall but they called me 2 days before classes start to say I couldn't attend clinicals because I had dropped Advanced Physio at Ivy Tech. You cannot drop any science class for any reason at any time and expect to get into clinicals at U of I. Would have been nice if they had let me know before I wasted my time driving there, doing orientation, changing my schedule, etc.

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