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In what areas do seasoned nurses work?

Nurses   (2,684 Views | 10 Replies)

7,444 Profile Views; 166 Posts

I'm just curious, where do experienced nurses (i.e. 5+ years) end up working? Just curious to know people's career paths.

There's not really a nursing ladder other than charge nurse or if you go back to school from what I know, but I'm sure there are other avenues I'm not thinking about...

Are there nurses who stay put in one area like telemetry or med/surg for most of their working career or do most people just keep moving around...and to where? Do many seasoned nurses stay in ICU/ER - why are there always openings in those areas? I thought that was where a lot of people wanted to be eventually. Thanks.

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Perpetual Student has 4+ years experience and specializes in PACU.

682 Posts; 9,377 Profile Views

I put seasoned nurses in my tacos--er never mind. You'll find experienced nurses in a wide range of settings and specialties. There is no particular place where nurses end up as they gain experience. Mostly it's a matter of individual aptitude and preference.

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BluegrassRN has 14 years experience.

1,188 Posts; 21,857 Profile Views

I've been on the same Medical unit as an RN for over 6 years now. I worked for 5 years before on this same unit as a CNA, then unit secretary, then LPN. I left for a while to do L&D and Mother/Baby, but I returned to the medical floor. I just like challenge the medical floor presents. I'll probably be here until I decide to go to days (at least another 5 years). Then I'll look for something a little different: maybe same day surgery, radiology (this interests me greatly, actually), or special procedures unit (infusions, scopes, that sort of thing). If I look for an office job, it would be something like oncology, where it's the combo of seeing pts in the office and actually providing oncology treatments (our hospital has an office like this), or some sort of specialty office, like cardiology or nephrology.

I'll stay within our hospital system, because of my seniority and my retirement fund (which my hospital matches contributions up to 4% of our annual salary, a decent deal.). But we own a lot of offices and facilities, so that won't be a problem.

At this point in my life (I'm 40), I have no desire to go to ICU or ER. I would have maybe 5 years ago, but not now. I'm in charge on my unit, I'm getting ready to do the Med/Surg certification, and I'm comfortable and confident in my environment. I'm one old dog who likes med/surg and wants to stay there.

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KelRN215 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pedi.

1 Article; 7,344 Posts; 68,808 Profile Views

Basically anywhere where nurses work, you will find "seasoned nurses". There is no track that everyone follows...

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166 Posts; 7,444 Profile Views

I suppose you do find experienced nurses in every area. I guess I should change my question to: what was your career path? I'm just curious what areas people hop around, too if at all. Thanks everyone for your comments so far!

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tokmom has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff.

4,568 Posts; 48,661 Profile Views

I have been in float pools for years, off and on, and then floated to other areas when they were short in non float pool facilities.

My career path is right where I want it for now. I like med/surg doing FT charge. With this title, I get to make decisions on how the floor functions and educate patients. I'm also studying for my certification.

As for ending up in ED/ICU? Oh heck no..not my forte. It has never been on my radar.

IF I ever change my job, it would be to venture into interventional radiology

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merlee has 36 years experience.

1,246 Posts; 13,651 Profile Views

'Seasoned' nurses work everywhere. Some actually enjoy bedside nursing, and are not that interested in becoming management. And some should not become management. I never really enjoyed being management even though I got good feedback when I did it.

Ultimately, home health was great for me - lots of direct pt care, some supervision!

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GitanoRN has 48 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in Trauma, ER, ICU, CCU, PACU, GI, Cardiology, OR.

2,114 Posts; 25,055 Profile Views

i'm just curious, where do experienced nurses (i.e. 5+ years) end up working? just curious to know people's career paths.

there's not really a nursing ladder other than charge nurse or if you go back to school from what i know, but i'm sure there are other avenues i'm not thinking about...

are there nurses who stay put in one area like telemetry or med/surg for most of their working career or do most people just keep moving around...and to where? do many seasoned nurses stay in icu/er - why are there always openings in those areas? i thought that was where a lot of people wanted to be eventually. thanks.

unquestionably, you'll find experienced nurses working in all departments.

however, i have noticed that most males as myself, work in e.r. & icu & ccu lastly trauma. having said that, during my nursing career i have only seeing a few seasoned male nurses in ob. moreover, i personally feel whatever, makes you happy is where you should stay. in answer to your question re: the frequent turn around in icu & ccu it's because these areas are very demanding of a nurse; and once a nurse has worked for over 4 or 5 yrs. in these departments they tend to move on. i personally have worked on, icu,ccu, pacu, er, oncology, gi, trauma, dialysis, urology,med surg, pulmonary,cardiology,neurology, and lastly worked as a flight nurse. all of it was by choice, i just wanted the experience, i hope i have answered your concerns... ciao~

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Merlyn specializes in none.

852 Posts; 10,707 Profile Views

LTC because I want to be with my own kind.

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CCRNDiva has 7 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Level II Trauma Center ICU.

365 Posts; 13,791 Profile Views

It depends. I work with several nurses who have remained in critical care for 20-30+ yrs. I've also worked with several who work in the unit for 1-2 yrs then move on. Like the above poster wrote, critical care can be very stressful. Some people think that's where they want to be but once they're there, it's too much. Others use critical care as a stepping stone to other things like management, CRNA, NP etc. Another point to make is that ICUs and ERs are seen as money losers for the hospital so their staff don't always get the best treatment. We are often called on to do more with less. That gets old after a while. Even those who love critical care will tire of mandatory OT, denied vacations and working in unsafe staffing conditions and decide to move on.

I've been in critical care for close to 8 years and I still enjoy it but I have the itch to move on so I'm in grad school.

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Esme12 has 40 years experience as a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

6 Followers; 4 Articles; 20,908 Posts; 149,018 Profile Views

I have stayed critical care/emergency department. I have worked in a cath lab, ICU, CT PACU, Trauma, PICU, cardiac anesthesia, emergency department and trauma flight.......I am what they call an adrenaline junky....:lol2:

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