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Hoyer/ Ceiling Lift Safety?

Safety   (469 Views | 9 Replies)

nursechilespice has 2 years experience as a LPN.

1,364 Profile Views; 24 Posts

I know it decreases patient risk for falls when two caregivers are present during the transfer of a patient by ceiling/ hoyer lift, but I’ve seen a colleague do a successful transfer (I walked in as they were being lowered to bed) alone. 

I told them just to let me know ahead of time so I could help them, but it got me thinking- would management write them up (if it was the manager instead of me in that moment) even if there was no damage or injury done?

I tried to look into my CCC hospital policy for ceiling lift but I couldn’t find anything... what would management do?

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12 Followers; 3,815 Posts; 28,787 Profile Views

A second source of info would be the manufacturer's recommended use of the product. Don't use it other than how they say it is to be used.

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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I've never worked anywhere that use of a lift required two people, one place even expressly discouraged it because with two people in the room there was the temptation to not use the lift at all.  

What would be the purpose in a second person when using a ceiling lift?

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

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To OP - if there ISN'T a policy (saying you just couldn't find one), perhaps you'd be doing everyone a big favor by bringing it up to TPTB.

Those lifts may BE safe for a 1-person lift, but getting it in writing into P&P makes it concrete, in light of an unexpected injury. Esp if it's new equip (or new employee) and inservice is needed.

In every place I worked, it was always a 2-person lift for those floor lifts. I know Homecare Nsg staff have had difficulties re 1-person usage versus 2-person use policy.

PP asks a good question. ANY lift requires proper application of the slings with all the belts and hooks to be done correctly. But I guess after a while, extensive practice makes perfect.

Just remembered late - I worked a NH where a pt WAS DROPPED while being hoyered. And there WERE at least 2 (maybe 3) staff present,

 

Edited by amoLucia

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nursechilespice has 2 years experience as a LPN.

24 Posts; 1,364 Profile Views

18 hours ago, MunoRN said:

I've never worked anywhere that use of a lift required two people, one place even expressly discouraged it because with two people in the room there was the temptation to not use the lift at all.  

What would be the purpose in a second person when using a ceiling lift?

I guess incase of any malfunctions?

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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6 minutes ago, nursechilespice said:

I guess incase of any malfunctions?

What would be the purpose of the second person in the event of a 'malfunction'?  

18 minutes ago, amoLucia said:

To OP - if there ISN'T a policy (saying you just couldn't find one), perhaps you'd be doing everyone a big favor by bringing it up to TPTB.

Those lifts may BE safe for a 1-person lift, but getting it in writing into P&P makes it concrete, in light of an unexpected injury. Esp if it's new equip (or new employee) and inservice is needed.

In every place I worked, it was always a 2-person lift for those floor lifts. I know Homecare Nsg staff have had difficulties re 1-person usage versus 2-person use policy.

PP's asks a good question. ANY lift requires proper application of the slings with all the belts and hooks to be done correctly. But I guess after a while, extensive practice makes perfect.

Just remembered late - I worked a NH where a pt WAS DROPPED while being hoyered. And there WERE at least 2 (maybe 3) staff present,

 

I'm not sure how additional staff would prevent a patient from being dropped, is the second person supposed to catch them?  It seems that would just result in two injured people instead of one.

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

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To PP - I'm guessing it's supposed to troubleshoot any technique safety issue to prevent any injuries???

Uh, like they now have to have 2 nurses for the insertion of any foley caths. A safety technique to prevent inf control technique break.

Just thinking - but you do bring up a good point.

I remember everyone just looking aghast at each other when we heard about the incident in report.

Like uh.....

Edited by amoLucia

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Glycerine82 has 4 years experience as a ASN, LPN and specializes in SNF/Rehab/Geri.

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While I'm not familiar with a ceiling lift, I've never worked anywhere that DIDN'T require two people for hoyer's.  

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VivaLasViejas has 20 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych.

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At the nursing homes where I've worked, we always used two nurses/CNAs for Hoyer lifts. One to operate the machine and the other as a spotter. Also handy when we had to roll the person from side to side to get the sling out from under him/her. Once in awhile I'd catch aa particular aide using the lift by herself and read her the riot act. It was facility policy and a good one IMHO.

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At our hospital, ceiling lifts and portable Hoyers are mandatory, no exceptions allowed 2 staff lift. One manages the machine, the other manages the position of the patient.  In our ICU, we commonly use 3 staff with mechanical lifts, as it makes everything go much smoother and quicker. 

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