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How has walking into HR worked out for you?

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Specializes in CDU, cardiac telemetry, med-surg. Has 5 years experience.

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

Well, I went ahead and e-mailed that manager a day or two after I posted about it (the one that wasn't there when I'd stopped by), and I received a call from her the other day. Of course I had just started work at the SNF and was standing at the nurse's station when she called, so I couldn't take it! :arghh: Since I was working PM, I couldn't call her back that day. I tried her a few times yesterday and left one VM, but no luck. She's out today, so I'm going to try her again tomorrow. I'm working a NOC shift tomorrow night, but I swear if she's willing to meet with me tomorrow, I'm going for it. I would LOVE to do this!! I'm so excited to at least have SOME movement going on. Of course on their website, my apps have all been rejected (at least they post something instead of leaving you hanging), but I assume she can change that if she so desires.

Nothing on the dream hospital yet, but if the first works out, I'll wait on the other one until I have the experience.

RunBaby

Best of luck and please keep us posted!!

The online app process is NOT new grad friendly! My NM never got the app I filled out online. Not even after I called HR and told them she was looking for it. They actually admitted to me that applications with less than a year experience are not forwarded to NMs!

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

RunBaby

Best of luck and please keep us posted!!

The online app process is NOT new grad friendly! My NM never got the app I filled out online. Not even after I called HR and told them she was looking for it. They actually admitted to me that applications with less than a year experience are not forwarded to NMs!

It's so frustrating. Even the non-new grad positions at this place say one year of experience is PREFERRED, not REQUIRED, but nothing will get forwarded. I finally spoke with her yesterday, and we're meeting there on Monday for an informational interview, and to schedule a job shadow. They're doing a Versant program this January, so I'm really hoping to get into that. She said there's a lot of internal interest as well, so they'll likely only take ONE external candidate for the unit. Luckily, she loves my prior experience, including my lactation certification (and experience working independently in this area), my NRP, and that I'm pursuing ACLS and STABLE (I'll have my ACLS before I even apply later this month). I hope all of this makes me stand out above the rest. I'm guessing by her enthusiasm that she's interested. :)

Frustrating is putting it mildly!! I would submit apps, go to the app status page and it said "not under consideration" within seconds! But when I called and they specifically told me that these apps aren't forwarded, I was livid!

I have my nrp, acls and am pursuing lactation certification. It is very hard to find STABLE around here.

I really hope you get the job! It seems that the entire industry needs to see new grads in specialty units doing well...if there are enough of us maybe things will change!

Nienna Celebrindal

Has 12 years experience.

They're doing a Versant program this January, so I'm really hoping to get into that. :)

Are you in socal? Would you mind sharing what area? I'm looking for hospitals that do these programs. I'm in the IE.

And yes, online sucks for new grads. I've talked to a few HRs and gone to a few and all but one little hospital told me applying online was my only option. One I went to the people in HR looked at me like I had 2 heads and sent me out the door 5 seconds after I walked. One small hospital had a really nice nurse recruiter who took my cover letter, resume and talked with me for 15 minutes. She didn't have anything open, but said she'd keep me in mind.

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

Are you in socal? Would you mind sharing what area? I'm looking for hospitals that do these programs. I'm in the IE.

And yes, online sucks for new grads. I've talked to a few HRs and gone to a few and all but one little hospital told me applying online was my only option. One I went to the people in HR looked at me like I had 2 heads and sent me out the door 5 seconds after I walked. One small hospital had a really nice nurse recruiter who took my cover letter, resume and talked with me for 15 minutes. She didn't have anything open, but said she'd keep me in mind.

I'm in the SF Bay Area, so quite a ways from you. This is a bit north of that.

NightCrow,

Go see the NM on the floor where there is an opening. It has worked for so many of my classmates and for me! All of our professors in school told us never to do this, so we all were a bit too shy to do it at first, but it actually works! One hospital in my area that ignored literally thousands of online applications from myself and my peers has so far hired 11 of my classmates in different departments in just the last two months. Everyone had applications ignored by the online system and several of my classmates had walked into HR and got the same two headed reaction you described. Bypassing HR got all of them hired. My situation was a little different, I wanted to work on the unit where I did my practicum, and I did the online application. I heard from my preceptor that the NM mentioned to her that she had been expecting my application and hadn't gotten it, so I called HR to ask them to forward it. They didn't, so I walked in with my resume. The NM was stunned to find out that they weren't forwarding new grad applications! After I told two of my classmates what she said, they did the same thing for the units they wanted to be on and all three of us got hired!

RunBaby, How is your search going? Any good news yet? I read on here that you left the SNF, sorry to hear it didn't work out! Wish you could move out here! There are L&D jobs EVERYWHERE right now in Colorado.

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

Walking in to see the NM will work if you already know someone. For example, scaredsilly had a preceptor there that let her know about the job. So if you know someone at the hospital, go for it. If you are a stranger to the hospital/know no one, then do not walk in. In NYC, security will not let you in to any floor if you do not have a purpose there. If you say you are there to see the NM, they will call up to the floor and tell the NM someone is there to see them. If the NM does not know you/you do not give the name of someone that she/he know that knows you (i.e. preceptor), you get asked to leave and apply online. No one in NYC that i heard of has gotten hired by walking in and the NM accepting to see the random new grad.

I would suggest to google the HR/NM and through the general format figure out the NM or HR's email address. This has gotten people replies and i got two interviews this way when i was a new grad. Through email (with a catchy title) , the NM or HR Rep does not feel cornered by a new grad asking for job during a busy day and they can reply to you when they get a free moment.

Estrella, we have to agree to disagree. NYC is obviously a different market. I do not think that most hospitals in other parts of the country are as locked down as you describe. I am in a large city in the west. I have visited sick relatives in hospitals in Florida, Chicago, Nevada, and LA, and never had to stop at security before proceeding up to the floor. NYC is what it is, and if it is that hard to get to the unit, then my advice and experiences do not apply to NYC.

Yes, I knew nurses on the floor and that did help me. Connections ALWAYS help. But as I previously stated, I know of around 25 classmates who all walked in asking to speak to NMs at different facilities and different units where they knew no one at all and got hired that way. NMs are nurses too! They were all new grads struggling for a first job at one point and the compassionate ones remember what that felt like. If you go in dressed well, with respect, and are polite and not demanding, they will (in many cases) speak to you, accept a resume, and if you are lucky schedule an interview.

I can't speak for NYC. I have never tried to get a job there, but in other cities, going in to speak to a NM is the ONLY way to get a job, and I would do it again in a heartbeat whether I knew someone or not. Like I said, what do you have to lose? You aren't going to get hired if the NM never sees your resume, and they won't if you follow HRs rules!! It is a no-lose situation! If a NM gets annoyed and "blacklists' you...well she wouldn't have hired you anyway so nothing to lose!

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

scaredsilly, your approach does work in towns and cities that are not as saturated as NYC, Chicago, LA, Miami, etc where new grads from all over plus RNs with years of experience are competing , with hundreds of apps for 1 job. In Colorado, this may be the way to go. The point in my post is that walking in to see the NM will not work everywhere (obviously not in large metro areas), so it depends where the posters seeking advice are located to try this approach or not. Basically, consider the location and job market before trying a Job Search tactic.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

scaredsilly, your approach does work in towns and cities that are not as saturated as NYC, Chicago, LA, Miami, etc where new grads from all over plus RNs with years of experience are competing , with hundreds of apps for 1 job. In Colorado, this may be the way to go. The point in my post is that walking in to see the NM will not work everywhere (obviously not in large metro areas), so it depends where the posters seeking advice are located to try this approach or not. Basically, consider the location and job market before trying a job search tactic.

This.

I tried to talk to a HR rep, that looked at me with two heads at a particular hospital, and I was a volunteer at the time trying to get into a nurse extern program.

I got into the same hospital years later as a new grad RN with experience ALONE (as an LPN) with no connections.

I am in a northeastern city that hasn't had a TRUE nursing shortage in decades.

Going to job fairs and LinkedIn had helped, and networking has helped far more than talking to an HR rep; and most times you can't look up a NM or even visit one, unless it's a chance encounter in an elevator.

I will also suggest joining a local state nursing association; there are tons of NMs that participate; and that can be a great way to help you secure a position. :yes:

location does make a difference! But again, you have nothing to lose! If it is the only way to get your resume to a NM, then you won't get hired without walking in anyway!

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

Actually all my classmates that got hired in the city either 2 months after graduation or a year after, were through online applications...and we all got called in to places that we did not walk into. Places we walkedin to and they (HR) took our resume, never called us. Online apps do get looked at, and we got rewarded for our patience. As LadyFree (who is from Philly) and I mentioned, your way does not work everywhere especially in larger cities. We agree it could work in certain places, but not in other places. But pushing walking into the see the NM as THE way to do things is not practical for those that are jobless, sure certain locations will take them...but in our areas here in the East, a miffed/interrupted NM will toss the resume out or disregard the new grad in case HR forwards their info to her...talk about where putting a face to a name works against you. Allnurses is a forum to help/advise those seeking advice. Not everyone is from locations such as yours.

So we could agree that those who live in areas such as yours, they can use your approach. While those in large metros/cities were NMs are not welcoming of random people walking onto the floor with the sole purpose of getting a job while the NM and staff are busy with patient care , should consider alternate contact methods. As a job seeker, the last thing you want to do is bother/p**s off someone with power to hire you. Advising all newbies in the US to walk-in to the NM b/c there is nothing to lose is not good. Imagine job seekers constantly starting to walk onto the floors seeking jobs...while everyone is overwhelmed with work...chaos ensues! Yes, there is something to lose. You could walk in at the wrong time and get someone with the power to hire you mad/annoyed...it happen to a classmate of mine.

Estella, Anyone (who is almost EVERYONE) who fills out an online application then goes to look at application status and sees it changed to "not under consideration" within seconds will disagree with you. No application submitted online with less than a year experience gets into human hands at many (if not most) of these facilities. Denver is a big city. Not AS big as NYC obviously, but it is large. So is Burbank, so is SLC, and in these places I know of classmates who have done the same thing.

As you state, AN is a place for advice, and in MANY cities, following yours will end up with a new nurse working as a bartender for a year waiting for a job.

These people have read both opinions, and I concede that in NYC people are hyper security and you cannot go in to see NMs. But in most places you really do have nothing to lose. I graduated in a class of 70. Most of us still keep in touch at least on Facebook. I am interested in what my classmates are doing and what the market is even though I found my job, and honestly, everyone of my classmates who are working in hospitals got a job by walking in on an NM in the three cities I mentioned above. There are still a few of them too frightened by advice like yours given to us in school to do anything but follow the rules and guess what? They are NOT working!

My advice is valid in most places. Your advice may be valid in NYC, and I see no reason not to allow all of these individuals to make up their own minds. Therefore, I refuse to continue what is turning into a somewhat heated argument with a person who appears to think that the whole world works like NYC! It doesn't! Really! I promise!

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

I have agreed at least twice that your way works in some places. However you are disparaging my advice. And i mentioned several big metro areas where "walking in" works against a candidate. You appear to think everywhere works like the areas you are familiar with (which are small to medium cities in the West)...well what is in NYC is the case in large metro areas. And I gave an example, where an NM was annoyed by a classmate of mine walking onto her unit while she is busy with patient care, and once HR did forward his info she chose to not call him (how i know? he called HR and they told him his info has been sent to the NM. In this case, HR was keeping contact with him but the NM had written him off for bother her on a busy day). Hence why i advice people to also go to job fairs, apply for new grad job posts (they do exist! as do open houses for new grads only), and email the HR/NM. There is more than one way to "go around the online apps". I kindly put advice here for those in areas where "walking in" will not work. For those that live in areas open to "walk-ins", I said a few times to go for it. But you are putting down my advice for anyone else that does not live in cities like yours. That is not fair for people who are not lucky to live in a friendlier area like you do. You have to keep arguing with me, even when I said several times that your method will work for some people but not all so everyone has to think about their location. That was all. No need to say "everywhere isnt like NYC". Rude. Have I been rude to you? No, i just said not everywhere is like where you are.

FYI, i am experience RN applying to other areas of interest and yes, I get not under consideration though i am experienced in nursing skills tranferrable to other departments (IVs, meds, wound care, adult and child conditions, etc). It is what it is, contacting HR and selling yourself (email works! I got two interviews as a new grad solely by emailing the recruiter) is an option as is attending the upcoming job fairs.

Edited by estrellaCR

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 11 years experience.

If there is security at the hospital entrance asking you to state your business/purpose in being at the facility and either looks up the patient info or calls the person in question...the plan to circumvent HR/online applications will not likely work. Many hospitals HR is off site so you can't walk into the facility and see HR in person as you will be directed to a computer kiosk to complete an online application.

Many facilities have online applications to screen qualifications and remove potential bias.

NY, NJ, PA, DC and parts of VA...all areas directly impacted post 9/11) have strict access security in hospitals and other facilities. These are places cold calling on HR or bypassing and attempting to see a nurse manager in person will be ineffective at best, if you are aggressive and insistent you can be marked persona non grata and ineligible for hire within the hospital system.

In other areas of the country where security breaches are not as likely, you may be able to apply in person, contact a nurse manager or nurse recruiter in person to hand over your cover letter & resume as it's more acceptable. Though dressing professional and acting like a professional will get you much farther than if you show up in jeans and acting demanding.

It's not just NYC with Fort Knox security in hospitals...in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia you must present a government issued ID such as a drivers license to visit a patient or accompany a child to an outpatient appointment. Most of NJ is not much different. Some of the inner city facilities also have metal detectors to pass through prior to entering the main hospital with armed guards or hired off duty police at the entrance. Especially level 1 trauma centers.

Quite often high risk areas such as LDRP, nursery, PICU, pediatrics, NICU, SICU, NICU, CVICU and TICU are locked units that have restricted patient visiting so it would be difficult to visit uninvited.

In other areas of the country new grads or other potential employees can more easily contact a nurse recruiter or manager and make an appointment to drop off a resume in person. Many subacute and long term care facilities actually encourage in person applications. (Though I've seen some candidates would likely have fared better with online application based upon their interpretation of "business" or professional attire. )

The end answer is know your market. Know the access limitations of your area facilities. Make connections while in school as a student to pave the way for potential employment. If you know that you wish to work in a restricted unit such as LDRP, NICU, PICU don't show up unannounced, try and make an appointment to meet with a manager. Know the risks and benefits of online vs in person applications.

I've seen this backfire on some candidates. Imagine if you were the manager and getting numerous applicants coming to you, which could disrupt daily care routine. There's a reason why hospitals and organizations have an HR department. It's up to you if you want to chance it. It has been successful at times, but you don't want to shoot yourself in the foot either. Good luck!