Jump to content

How should i round this based on the given rounding rules?

Rounding Rules:

parenteral

Intravenous infusion by gravity (gtts/min): round to a whole number

Intravenous infusion by pump (mL/hr): round to the nearest tenth

Injectable medications:

  • For any volume less than 1 mL, round to the nearest hundredth
  • For any volume greater than 1 mL, round to the nearest tenth

ENTERAL

Oral/NGT/PEG/J Tube:

  • For any volume less than 1 mL, round to the nearest hundredth
  • For any volume greater then 1mL, round to the nearest tenth

WEIGHT:

POUNDS TO KILOGRAMS CONVERSIONS: round to the nearest tenth

___________________________________________

Question:

  1. The prescriber orders Nitroprusside 5 mcg/kg/min. The medication available is labeled Nitroprusside 200 mg /250 mL.

Patient weight: 205lbs

Calculate the rate on the pump.

Answer: 35.3 mL/hr (according to the answer key it says the answer is 35, but based on the rounding rules, wouldn't the answer be rounded to the tenth?)

I get 34.95mL/hr which would round to 35mL/hr.

Can you show your math?

It says round to the nearest tenth, so why is everyone rounding to the whole number? That is what is throwing me off.

loriangel14 specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

It says round to the nearest tenth, so why is everyone rounding to the whole number? That is what is throwing me off.

If you are setting a pump I don't think you can set it to partial mls.

MrChicagoRN specializes in Leadership, Psych, HomeCare, Amb. Care.

Plus, the difference between 34.9 and 35 ml/hr is only 0.00287% , and totals 2.4 ml over the entire 24 hours.

The difference is insignificant. Remain calm and round off to the nearest whole number.

NICUmiiki specializes in NICU/PICU Flight Nursing.

I've never seen a pump that will let you set it more precise than a whole number. That's why you would round to a whole number.

You aren't just arbitrarily rounding numbers. It is all based on the instrument you'll use to administer the drug.

The gtts/min rounds to a whole number because you (the nurse) cannot count 39.6 or 27.4 drops. For oral and injectable drugs, you round depending on the size syringe you'll use. 1 mL syringes are measured to the hundredth of a mL, and the bigger syringes get less precise as you go up.

FlyingScot specializes in Peds/Neo CCT,Flight, ER, Hem/Onc.

I've never seen a pump that will let you set it more precise than a whole number. That's why you would round to a whole number.

Actually, there are many pumps that allow you to do this and with infants and children it's important to have this ability.

NICUmiiki specializes in NICU/PICU Flight Nursing.

Actually, there are many pumps that allow you to do this and with infants and children it's important to have this ability.

You are so right. I didn't even think about syringe pumps and the like. Thanks!

It says round to the nearest tenth, so why is everyone rounding to the whole number? That is what is throwing me off.

when the answer is 34.95, rounding to the nearest the to gives you 35.

34.95---> you are working with the .95 part of the answer. Since the tenths place happens to be a 9, it affects the whole number.

If it were 34.75, it would become 34.8

if it were 34.85, it would become 34.9

Since it's 34.95, it becomes 35.0 (35 since trailing zeros are not allowed). Hopefully that makes sense? :)

×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.