Jump to content

How to phase in/out of Peds

Posted

Here's my question:

If my primary focus has been PEDS do you have any advice about how to transition back into adult care?

If you have only been employed working with adults any advice on how to transition into PEDS?

Any Ideas welcome :-)

Surprised1, MSN, RN

Specializes in pediatric neurology and neurosurgery. Has 9 years experience.

I was able to transfer from adults to peds because I had a contact in the pediatric hospital. Do you have any contacts in the field you're interested in?

LoveMyBugs, BSN, CNA, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics.

How I got into peds was; peds home health then, peds LTC then, peds acute.

Only fellow RNs but I feel like I really stink at asking for help. I have many friends that I could ask I just never know what to say.

"Oh hey so-and-so can you talk to your mgmt and pass my resume to them?"

All my nurse friends in the hospital act very stand off-ish when it comes to giving someone a leg up. What's up with that?

Lovemybugs PEDS ltc, there is only one facility in my area. And its also on a who do you know hiring basis. The DON was super unprofessional last I spoke with him. Im nervous about calling back. How long ago did you work PEDS LTC?

LoveMyBugs, BSN, CNA, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics.

I worked peds LTC for 2.5 yrs. I started out on-call status then was offered a part-time then a full time position. While working there I finished my BSN, the I started applying to the hospitals, was offered on-call then while on orientation offered full time.

Take what peds experience you can, and grow from it.

~PedsRN~, BSN, RN

Specializes in Acute Care Pediatrics. Has 4 years experience.

I was hired straight out of nursing school into my hospital. :) I was one of the lucky ones that walked into pediatrics. It's all about who you know in the hospital. I precepted my final semester in the hospital, and then gave my resume to the nurse manager on the floor I precepted on. I wasn't hired on that floor because they weren't hiring, but I did get hired into the hospital!

laKrugRN

Specializes in Cardiac, ER, Pediatrics, Corrections.

I was lucky enough to get my foot in the door at a hospital and then transfer over to Peds. They thought my bubbly personality would be a great fit. Just be yourself and sometimes that's all it takes to get noticed and get opportunities thrown to you.

As a hiring manager...I do not always look for experience. Yes it is nice to train someone who already knows pediatrics but I would encourage you to explore other things that will make your resume more interesting. For example, learn Spanish...anyone with a license and speaks Spanish will get an interview with me. They won't necessarily get the job but it gets them in the door. Join committees, go to conferences, work on projects. In the interview sell yourself...don't be modest. Tell them exactly why you deserve the position and what you can bring to the table... Be prepared. Also, ask the interviewers why they like pediatrics, why they stuck with it, and why they like working for the organization.

If you work in an ICU setting it would be easier to transition. Also peds in general, I would think, would share some common things with the older adult population. Obviously very different types of patients but similar needs in many ways: mobility, awareness that drugs will process differently in these populations, having the skills to communicate with patients who have impaired or decreased communication skills, and working with families along with the patients themselves.

AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ED, Pedi Vasc access, Paramedic serving 6 towns.

OP do you work in a hospital that has a pediatric floor? If so just send a friendly email to the nurse manager of the unit you wish to work on and express your interest and list experience that might be helpful that you can carry over from your previous unit.

I have been job 'stalking' my previous hospital for Special Care Nursery jobs and pediatric unit jobs and it may be paying off soon!

Good luck.

Annie

If you work in an ICU setting it would be easier to transition. Also peds in general, I would think, would share some common things with the older adult population. Obviously very different types of patients but similar needs in many ways: mobility, awareness that drugs will process differently in these populations, having the skills to communicate with patients who have impaired or decreased communication skills, and working with families along with the patients themselves.

I totally agree that having adult experience helps. At my facility we still get 18 year olds with an occasional 20 year old. Being able to communicate with adults really helps with these patients.

My advice is to just keep being persistent! Apply for every job opportunity you see in peds.