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How I inform interested employers of my past.

Recovery   (997 Views | 10 Replies)

SineQuaNon has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in ED, Family Practice, Home Health.

706 Profile Views; 35 Posts

Hi All!

I thought I would share with you all my basic form response when I get an email or call of interest about a job I've applied for. So far it has worked really well for me and I'm actually turning down offers whilst looking for the perfect fit.

" Hello,

Thanks for your interest in scheduling an interview. I can make myself available, but before we schedule, I want to inform you that I have a felony. I realize this a a deal breaker for some employers.

Many years ago I was a horrible drug addict and I did not make it out of that time in my life without legal repercussions. But, to be honest, I personally am OK with it because it was those repercussions that helped me get clean. And if a felony is the price for this life I have now, it was more than worth it.

As horrible, debasing, and humiliating as that time of my life was, it has honestly made me a better person. Kinder, more empathetic, and more humble.

There is no one in my life that isn't aware of my past and I'm blessed to have a number of professional contacts who know my skill set and would unhesitatingly recommend me.

But! I completely understand if this is a hard stop for you.

Regardless, thank you for your consideration and have a lovely day.

SineQuaNon"

Literally everyone I've sent this to has responded that they still want to go ahead with the interview.

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460 Posts; 5,358 Profile Views

That is great.  I, too, have been pretty upfront with my monitoring agreement.  So far, everyone seems to be okay with it.  The first time I had to tell an interviewer was hard and I thought my heart was pounding out of my chest.  But once the words were out of my mouth, I felt immense relief.  I think there are more nurses out there than we are aware of who have had to walk the path of either the BON or monitoring.

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SineQuaNon has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in ED, Family Practice, Home Health.

35 Posts; 706 Profile Views

Every time I still feel as if my heart jumps into my throat but I just take a big swallow and go ahead and do it anyway. I think there are more than we realize, both among nurses and the general population. I'm so glad active addiction is no longer a part of my life.

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21 Posts; 134 Profile Views

That is something I am putting together also. I try to mention my monitor program upfront but have been advised against that. I’m not sure what to do

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wvnurse2020 has 4 years experience.

14 Posts; 200 Profile Views

I don't know that I would necessarily say horrible drug addict. you could say I had a problem with drugs and chose to get the help that I needed... they don't necessarily need the whole story or even the substance of choice. 

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SineQuaNon has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in ED, Family Practice, Home Health.

35 Posts; 706 Profile Views

Because I have a felony for prescription fraud, I feel it's best to get it out in the open as soon as possible so that I don't waste their time or mine. When they run the background check they will find out about it for sure. And I was a horrible addict. But now I'm not. I don't really want to downplay it because I've come so far. And I didn't choose to get help, that decision was made for me when I got caught. But I think you're right, depending on the circumstances saying less may be better.

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31 Posts; 1,142 Profile Views

On 5/6/2020 at 5:48 PM, SineQuaNon said:

Hi All!

I thought I would share with you all my basic form response when I get an email or call of interest about a job I've applied for. So far it has worked really well for me and I'm actually turning down offers whilst looking for the perfect fit.

" Hello,

Thanks for your interest in scheduling an interview. I can make myself available, but before we schedule, I want to inform you that I have a felony. I realize this a a deal breaker for some employers.

Many years ago I was a horrible drug addict and I did not make it out of that time in my life without legal repercussions. But, to be honest, I personally am OK with it because it was those repercussions that helped me get clean. And if a felony is the price for this life I have now, it was more than worth it.

As horrible, debasing, and humiliating as that time of my life was, it has honestly made me a better person. Kinder, more empathetic, and more humble.

There is no one in my life that isn't aware of my past and I'm blessed to have a number of professional contacts who know my skill set and would unhesitatingly recommend me.

But! I completely understand if this is a hard stop for you.

Regardless, thank you for your consideration and have a lovely day.

SineQuaNon"

Literally everyone I've sent this to has responded that they still want to go ahead with the interview.

What state are you in? My license is still on probation in Illinois and have had very bad luck with interviews. 

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KatEverly is a BSN and specializes in ABSN Grad w/ previous BA in Psych.

100 Posts; 548 Profile Views

I wonder if it would be more realistic and less shaming to say “I had a significant drug addiction” instead of calling yourself a “horrible drug addict.” 

That’s the kind of terminology that really is harmful to people in recovery and public perception. So while it may not be hurtful for you to say it about yourself, being a meaningful part of the recovering community means advocating for more helpful terminology and placing the emphasis on maladaptive behaviors and not demonizing the person.

Edited by KatEverly

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SineQuaNon has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in ED, Family Practice, Home Health.

35 Posts; 706 Profile Views

On 5/15/2020 at 7:51 AM, OncRN13 said:

What state are you in? My license is still on probation in Illinois and have had very bad luck with interviews. 

I'm in New Mexico. And I was just offered a pediatric NP position at a clinic. I'm off probation and have been for a bit but I was still able to get a job while on it. Try LTC, home health. That's where I was able to get my foot back in the door.

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Tracy653 has 20 years experience.

20 Posts; 112 Profile Views

On 5/15/2020 at 8:51 AM, OncRN13 said:

What state are you in? My license is still on probation in Illinois and have had very bad luck with interviews. 

 

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Tracy653 has 20 years experience.

20 Posts; 112 Profile Views

If u get lucky u may find someone to give u a chance either way. For the most part u either don’t get hired or u are hired then basically harassed until u quit or do something of any kind that can constitute u being fired. 

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