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How to calculate for "how much remains after X-Hours?"

Posted

I cant seem to get math questions that ask for how much volume is left after an specific amount of time.

They would have the drop factor, the rate, the starting volume and time form in 12:00pm to 2:00pm. Then the questions would ask for how much would remain in the bag after 2pm.

Is there an easy formula to calculate for this kinda questions? and an easy one to remember.

I can do other common math problems but not these ones.

Help please!!!!!!!

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 16 years experience.

You should have the information needed to calculate how much would infuse from 12:00 to 2:00. The volume remaining is what didn't infuse- so if you start with a 500mL bag and infuse 250mL, how much is left? That's how you should think about these questions.

Bedside_Life RN

Specializes in Surgical Intensive Care. Has 3 years experience.

Lets say that you are infusing Magnesium IVPB 50 mL, over two hours, using secondary tubing with a drop factor of 15. The infusion is ordered to be started at 1300.

What is the rate in mL/hr?

What is the VTBI?

What is the volume that will be infused in 30 minutes?

What volume will be left at 1400?

**Tell how you would start this problem, and we'll help from there**

**Even if you get stuck, at least try it. You are learning***

Lets say that you are infusing Magnesium IVPB 50 mL, over two hours, using secondary tubing with a drop factor of 15. The infusion is ordered to be started at 1300.

What is the rate in mL/hr?

What is the VTBI?

What is the volume that will be infused in 30 minutes?

What volume will be left at 1400?

**Tell how you would start this problem, and we'll help from there**

**Even if you get stuck, at least try it. You are learning***

Im lost. you didnt give the rate.

heres an example of what im talking about.

Client is recieving 40gtt/H dextrose, IV set works as 10gtt/ml, the beginning volume of dextrose is 1000ml at 12 noon. How many ml will remain at 3pm?

psu_213, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency, Telemetry, Transplant. Has 6 years experience.

Client is recieving 40gtt/H dextrose, IV set works as 10gtt/ml, the beginning volume of dextrose is 1000ml at 12 noon. How many ml will remain at 3pm?

Although I have never seen an order written in gtt/hour….

1. If the pt. gets 40 gtts. in one hour, and each 10 gtt deliver one mL, how many milliliters is the pt. getting per hour?

2. Then how much would the pt. get in the 3 hour window?

3. If you started with 1000 mL of the dextrose, how much is now left?

Although I have never seen an order written in gtt/hour….

1. If the pt. gets 40 gtts. in one hour, and each 10 gtt deliver one mL, how many milliliters is the pt. getting per hour?

2. Then how much would the pt. get in the 3 hour window?

3. If you started with 1000 mL of the dextrose, how much is now left?

Oh shoot!

Sorry! its actually 40gtt/min! haha! thanks for mentioning it

psu_213, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency, Telemetry, Transplant. Has 6 years experience.

Oh shoot!

Sorry! its actually 40gtt/min! haha! thanks for mentioning it

Then for #1: they get 40 gtts in one minute. How many mL do they get in that minute if they get a mL for every 10 gtts? How much would they get in an hour? (Parts 2 and 3 stay the same.)

mrsboots87

Specializes in Neuro, Telemetry. Has 6 years experience.

Drop factor of 15 = 15gtt/min. She did give the rate.

Bedside_Life RN

Specializes in Surgical Intensive Care. Has 3 years experience.

drop factor of 15 would reflect 15 drops (gtt) per mL. So if you are infusing 50mL, you would be infusing 750 drops Total. If 750 drops are to be infused over 2 hours, there would be 375 drops q1h...... you can further break it down by smaller time intervals in this same way. So the rate is up to you to figure out....?

To do this, take the 375 gtt (or 25mL) per hour and divide by 60 minutes. So the drops per minute would be 6.25 and the mL per minute would be 0.42mL.

this would answer gtt/min and mL/min.

if you work it out for both gtt and mL it will give you additional resources to work the problem out.

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi. Has 10 years experience.

The formula you are looking for is subtraction. You figure out how much has infused and then subtract that volume from the total volume and you get the remaining volume.

Ex, if you have 1,000 mL D5NS infusing at 100 mL/hr and you hang the bag at 12:00, at 2:00 there will be 800 mL remaining in the bag. 12:00-2:00 is 2 hours, you are running 100 mL/hr x 2 hrs = 200 mL. 1000 mL total -200 mL infused = 800 mL remaining. Don't make this more complicated than it needs to be.

mrsboots87

Specializes in Neuro, Telemetry. Has 6 years experience.

Ey yi yi. I just came back to this and saw my error. So as not to look like an idiot, I just want to note I totally meant that drop factor of 15 means 15gtt/mL not min. Oops.

Im lost. you didnt give the rate.

heres an example of what im talking about.

Client is recieving 40gtt/H dextrose, IV set works as 10gtt/ml, the beginning volume of dextrose is 1000ml at 12 noon. How many ml will remain at 3pm?

She did give the rate. It says, "50ml over two hours." If you can't do that in your head and come up with "25cc/hour" I don't think we can help you.

I think some of your problem is that you aren't familiar enough with the components of these word problems, so you get flustered if you don't see them in a particular order or format.

In your example above, there is no such prescription as gtt/hour. That's one of your problems right there. Reread it and try again.

danielle2000, MSN, RN

Specializes in Family Practice. Has 1 years experience.

I hate math lol!!!!

I hate math lol!!!!

That's a fashionable thing for girls to say and more's the pity, but if you are sure you've got enough butter when you multiply a recipe for cookies, enough cash to buy the three gallons of gas it will take to get you home, and whether the store has given you enough change for your ten, you know enough math to get you through life and nursing school, and you don't hate it that much.

If not, well, I suppose you could hire a butler. Whatever you do, though, don't teach your daughter it's ok to "hate math." It isn't, if only for the fact that she'll have a much wider range of options when she grows up and be able to provide for your grandchildren better.