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Hireability out of Accelerated BSN program

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Knubbs Knubbs (New) New

Not sure if it's even a word, but just curious about how hireable someone would be coming out of an accelerated BSN program with zero nursing/health background.

I'm considering making a career change to nursing in my early 30s and plan to do all the little things I can in the meantime to make myself as marketable to employers as possible (volunteering at hospitals, learning additional languages, etc.) but there's no getting around the fact that my health background is nil. I know I'm capable of nailing the pre-reqs and thriving in nursing school, and I don't doubt my own competence or ability to do the job well. But I still have to actually get the job.

Ultimately my question is this: How much weight does the Accelerated BSN degree carry? In general, would the successful completion of the Accelerated BSN program be enough that employers would be happy to have me, or would I be fighting an uphill battle against other grads who maybe have slightly more relevant experience than myself?

Thanks for any guidance. This board has been an invaluable resource/inspiration and helped me put together the puzzle that is applying to BSN programs.

windsurfer8, BSN

Specializes in Psych/Military Nursing. Has 13 years experience.

You degree does not say "ABSN" it is a BSN. You have the exact amount of coursework anyone else with a BSN has.

You have the exact same odds of getting hired as anyone else.

No one asks if you have an "ABSN" It is just a way to designate you have a previous degree and are deemed capable of completing 21 hours a semester of nursing school. No small feat.

I had no nursing experience and I worked from the day I graduated until present day. Having a BSN is a good start then you have to pass the NCLEX then you apply for jobs like anyone else.

WookieeRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in PACU. Has 3 years experience.

It would carry the same weight as all the other new grad BSNs applying for the same jobs. There is no distinction between ABSN/BSN.

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

I respectfully disagree with PP. Hiring managers in my organization are very aware of the nature of different schools/programs & will ask for this information as part of the screening process for new grads. They prefer generic BSN grads. There is an increasing reluctance to hire any 'accelerated' grads (either ABSN or entry-level MSN) due to insufficient enculturation and exposure to health care in general, and nursing care specifically among these grads. They have been stereotyped as 'book smart' but unable to apply their knowledge in actual nursing practice.

windsurfer8, BSN

Specializes in Psych/Military Nursing. Has 13 years experience.

What are you talking about? It is a BSN. You complete the EXACT same classes you just take many at at time. The only point of an Accelerated BSN is because those people have proven through the first degree they are capable of completing the intense coursework. You get a BSN. My bachelors degree in nursing has nothing "A" on it and no one asks. I have no idea where you are getting that information but if you are screening people on assumptions and not hiring on their credentials you are looking at major issues. That is the most asinine thing I have ever heard. My fellow students were PROVEN students who were able to navigate an intense workload with excellent grades. Since you are not hiring people based on assumptions what actual statistical data do you have that states second degree BSN holders are less capable at nursing? You are saying these people who actually have completed more coursework are less capable based on WHAT??? I am waiting for your statistical data..not your assumptions.

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 5 years experience.

They have been stereotyped as 'book smart' but unable to apply their knowledge in actual nursing practice.

This is the best laugh I have had today. That is absolutely absurd. I guarantee that every one of my ABSN classmates are very capable in applying their knowledge to actual nursing practice. Obviously there are many hospitals that don't share the same narrow mindedness because many of us were quickly hired into ICU settings.

WookieeRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in PACU. Has 3 years experience.

This is the best laugh I have had today. That is absolutely absurd. I guarantee that every one of my ABSN classmates are very capable in applying their knowledge to actual nursing practice. Obviously there are many hospitals that don't share the same narrow mindedness because many of us were quickly hired into ICU settings.

I'm going to have to agree. When I was in charge of hiring, all I cared about was whether or not they had the BSN and not whether is was ABSN, traditional, online, etc.

iPink, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, Postpartum. Has 7 years experience.

ABSN grad here and my BSN, stated on my diploma, didn't hinder me from obtaining my current job. In fact it's because of my BSN why I was chosen...magnet status hospital.

Sent via iPink's phone using allnurses

I agree -- whether it's fair or not, whether it's justified or not, facilities are legally free to have preferences about the kinds of programs people attended, same as hospitals and other healthcare employers are free to prefer BSN grads to ADN grads. I work at a large academic medical center affiliated with a university that has a "regular" BSN program and an accelerated BSN program. The students do lots of their clinicals in the medical center (obviously :)). On my service, the ABSN students have made a v. poor impression compared to the "regular" BSN students in their clinicals, and my service would be v. reluctant to hire any of the accelerated students. I don't know how widespread this phenomenon is, and I don't have any "statistical data" -- but I'm not talking about "assumptions;" I'm talking about personal experience.

PacoUSA, BSN, RN

Specializes in PCU / Telemetry. Has 8 years experience.

I respectfully disagree with PP. Hiring managers in my organization are very aware of the nature of different schools/programs & will ask for this information as part of the screening process for new grads. They prefer generic BSN grads. There is an increasing reluctance to hire any 'accelerated' grads (either ABSN or entry-level MSN) due to insufficient enculturation and exposure to health care in general, and nursing care specifically among these grads. They have been stereotyped as 'book smart' but unable to apply their knowledge in actual nursing practice.

Your hiring managers are idiots.

Have them come to my unit and watch us in action. I guarantee you they will never be able to correctly pick out the accelerated BSN grads from the basic BSN grads. Trained and oriented the same under the same state license. At the end of the day, we are ALL nurses!

I'm wondering how this plays out with entry to practice MSN degrees?