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Hey, Managers! What's up with the "weeding out" of good nurses?

Nurses   (23,735 Views | 188 Replies)

UM Review RN is a ASN, RN and specializes in Utilization Management.

7 Articles; 29,309 Profile Views; 5,163 Posts

You are reading page 9 of Hey, Managers! What's up with the "weeding out" of good nurses?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

7 Posts; 867 Profile Views

Worked for a co. for 10 years that was just like this and saw many people hurt and fired over stupid write ups. I could see my time time coming so I transfered to another facility in Dallas about 3 years ago and I have to say they are not at all like that. They don't have time for those little games. The only change I have seen them make in that direction was to get rid of agency and hire more prn's and part-time nurses. I am glad I was able to leave the other job and I feel much more secure in this facility. Many places are like that but not all so try to leave the one you are at as soon as possible and find a place that will appreciate a good nurse.

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baileyboo923 has 19 years experience and specializes in pediatrics.

6 Posts; 715 Profile Views

:mad: :mad: Amen sister!!!!

Kim

mmanagers get the idea they want to dictate what happens on "their" unit. They can't do that if they have "seasoned" staff, who will stand up against their bogus ideas of granduer. Whereas, new grads and travelers, are not as bold.

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malinne has 30 years experience and specializes in OR, Med/Surg, Renal, Oncology.

9 Posts; 899 Profile Views

Angie,

That's deplorable, but I know it does happen. I don't understand it. I manage three units and I can tell you--I'll do practically anything to retain my experienced staff or to hire in an RN with experience. I've even had to go up against HR because they didn't want to offer as much as I thought was needed to get a nurse to sign-on.

We have quite a few GN's too. But if you just go for the lower $, you sacrifice quality of patient care. There is NO substitute for experience!

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8 Posts; 665 Profile Views

Angie,

I agree-happened to me-I am taking legal action-filed complaint with eeoc-age discrimination and wrongful termination-eeoc issued right to sue this past week-however this action did get me out of a bad situation that is getting worse at the hospital I worked at-I am going to work at a much nicer hospital close by that has good openings in my field. I am in n.c. and there is an article by dr. carol swink on the ncbon.com website in the n.c. nursing bulletin which talks some about this-nc bon had to come up with a program which I am enrolled in because no remediation was given to me, when it has been for younger ones-I am going in oct. to be re-instated, I never would have thought this could happen to me, but I have fought back and have physician supporters.

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lamazeteacher specializes in OB, HH, ADMIN, IC, ED, QI.

2,170 Posts; 16,466 Profile Views

Recently there's been a spate of write-ups I've heard about that are basically bogus. Minor infractions that no one else would get written up over. I'm furious.

On the surface, it doesn't seem to be a big deal. But anyone who's been in health care can tell you--our nursing culture teaches us that bogus write-ups are a warning to get outta Dodge; it's useless to fight; easier to just change units.

So these nurses have all left for greener pastures.

I have a sneaking suspicion that the nurses were targeted because they earned more than new grads. Because coincidentally, there are a few new grads on each of these units, and the basic "numbers" of the nurses has not changed. In years.

So 'fess up, Managers, what's the deal? Is this what really is happening out there? Is your budget such that it looks better for you to keep the new grads rather than the experienced nurses? Do you use bogus writeups to "encourage" certain nurses to leave?

Or is something else afoot here?

I agree with your statements, and wish to add an additional impetus for managers eliminating good nurses. As (gag) a 67 year old old (with all my faculties) I have been plagued for the past 10 years, with at least 5 situations such as you described. Come to find out that employers are charged more (duh!) for aged employees, now. So (in)Human Resources gets into the act, screaming "get rid of (her/him). It's costing us money".

I learned that hard, cruel fact from a friend who owns a large business. When her husband turned 65, their health insurance company wouldn't

recognize Medicare as the "primary" coverage, and charged $900./month for his insurance alone! That's worse than the banks' charges now.

Anothger fact hard learned when I took (prescribed) enteric coated Ibuprophen and had a Gastric Hemorrhage and bills you wouldn't believe (Iron IV infusions cost $2,000. each, more than blood transfusions - I'd only accept one of those). Of course Medicare paid what they thought should be the charge (after all, older patients shrink, and take up less space?), and now the healthycare providers, institutions, etc. want their pounds of flesh. Not only does the Medicare B cost of $150. monthly come out of my paltry social security check, but it only pays 80%, so another "supplemental" Medigap policy for another $150./month is needed (that the insurance companies say pays all of the rest...... Medicare D is a joke. The monthly costs for that, when more than one drug company's products is needed (I have 3, from 3 different companies), is more than the medication would cost outright - in Canada, where I come from, and I use my sister's neighborhood pharmacy.

The need for "single party" health insurance in the U.S. is dire, yet most people distrust anything the government does here, so it's back to Canada for me, and hopefully meaningful employment there. However my children will remain here, and I'll see my grandchildren less often, not a good thing.

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4 Posts; 937 Profile Views

I recently left an organization after a conversation with the OD and manager of my unit (who by the way was mysteriously struck mute during this meeting) in HR that would probably pass as a comedy routine. You all know the one that goes ". . you can't quit because I'm firing you. . "

It started almost a year prior with the then new OD (3rd in 5 years) calling me aside to tell me that with the start date of our new manager (also 3rd in 5 years) it would be a clean slate for all . . . except apparently me. She then proceeded to tell me what a horrible person I am, that I am a "major player" (no definition although I asked 3 separate times) and that she would be watching me. OK, forwarned. Why didn't I just look elsewhere then - beats me except that I really liked my coworkers and felt an obligation to my already understaffed unit.

Then came the barely recognizable complaints. When I asked for documentation it was VERY slow to come. Since we chart on computers and I don't have access to the archived material I had to ask repeatedly for access. I finally was able to review charting and present my point of view and suggested they talk with coworkers who were present. Needless to say nothing I said was taken as anything near the truth and the coworkers were not consulted. Why confuse the issue with the truth?

In the middle of this I was significantly injured by an out of control patient. The manager made inappropriate comments about my ability to work with the injury and then would almost immediately contradict her first statement. The OD who was fully aware of the extent of the injury never so much as said 'stinks to be you' although I saw her almost every shift I worked. While I did wonder if they would take advantage of that situation they did not.

When I returned to regular duties full time the same quality of complaints started immediately. Why didn't I just leave then? I truly believed that the quality of their comments to and about me would never stand up. There was never a complaint about the quality of care I provide my patients.

In this same time period this OD fired one manager, after she gave her notice, two house supervisors, two RTs (and hired one that reeks of old, haven't bathed in a while cigarette smoke) - after they exposed the fact that the 'smoke detector' in their office space was actually a camera -, a lab tech and two more nurses.

Although this hospital is a part of a larger organization it is a relatively small, originally "community" hospital. All this activity was having a very negative effect on the staff and young nurses were leaving almost before they could finish orientation.

As far as HR goes, NO help there. I submitted a complaint about these activities that went NOWHERE but the HR managers desk. The HR manager went so far as to threaten me when I declined to schedule a meeting for 8AM following 3 scheduled 12 hour night shifts.

OK, this is one of those things where you had to be there. I recognize that the more I protest the guiltier I sound and believe me I have spent many hours reexamining the issues to find a way to correct whatever it was that brought on this attack by the OD and manager.

After 22 years of nursing I'm not sure I care to continue. Fortunately for me no one is going to go hungry if I do not work.

Why does this kind of abuse continue in a profession that should be nurturing and empathic? I don't have an answer.

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WhatNext? has 40 years experience and specializes in Psych/mental health.

16 Posts; 1,923 Profile Views

So, is it better to quit, or make them fire you?

My lawyer asked me why I didn't quit a job that became toxic and eventually ended when I got fired.

The lesson I took away from that comment is that it is better to leave a job when you realize you can't seem to do anything right (another view of being targeted).

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8 Posts; 552 Profile Views

I recently graduated a LVN program and have not began working yet, but what you are talking about reminds me a great deal of nursing school. We had teachers who would rally together to try to get rid ofcertain students and other teachers who would hang out with students and talk crap about the others. I made it through because I kept my mouth shut and didn't get involved with other peoples battles. I believe that ultimatly nurses out there will eat there own. And what makes it worse is we fight against each other and concentrate on our own personal problems and forget about the paitents. Our Pts should never know what is happening outside of their doors. I wish nursing was the way it used to be. when it was a discipline a true proffession of compassion rather than a profession of what we can do to make ourselves look good or to cut costs for our company so we get a big bonus every three months. :mad:

Recently there's been a spate of write-ups I've heard about that are basically bogus. Minor infractions that no one else would get written up over. I'm furious.

On the surface, it doesn't seem to be a big deal. But anyone who's been in health care can tell you--our nursing culture teaches us that bogus write-ups are a warning to get outta Dodge; it's useless to fight; easier to just change units.

So these nurses have all left for greener pastures.

I have a sneaking suspicion that the nurses were targeted because they earned more than new grads. Because coincidentally, there are a few new grads on each of these units, and the basic "numbers" of the nurses has not changed. In years.

So 'fess up, Managers, what's the deal? Is this what really is happening out there? Is your budget such that it looks better for you to keep the new grads rather than the experienced nurses? Do you use bogus writeups to "encourage" certain nurses to leave?

Or is something else afoot here?

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6 Posts; 663 Profile Views

I cannot believe this is happening. i am a manager of an obstetrical unit in Canada and I could not afford to lose any senior nurses. We don't have the new grads to replace the nurses leaving because of retirement. I agree many managers tend to harp on the negatives and rarely give positive feedback. i am a new manager less than one year and I have worked to people like that and never want to be one. When I have to speak with staff about concerns I always try to tell them that we will work toghether to fix the problems. I am truly sorry for your difficulties because it sounds like a very awful place to work.

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moodychick has 35 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Emergency.

80 Posts; 2,044 Profile Views

Angie, you are so right! We got a new manager last year, and you would not believe the good nurses she badgered until they quit!!! She was always calling them to the office; and funny, the old manager never had the slightest problem with any of these nurses; and neither did the rest of the staff. One nurse would speak her mind if she thought a doc was wrong and a patient could be jeopardized. But, aren't we supposed to do that as patient advocates? The old manager was wonderful and got along with all of us. She would work with you if you had a problem. I'm sure that's why she was gotten rid of.:madface:

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210 Posts; 3,263 Profile Views

I think that new nurses should be helped along the way, not shown the door. How soon we forget that we used to be new nurses too....

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210 Posts; 3,263 Profile Views

These places are not in the minority my dear....

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