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HELP!! So Confused on the Route to Take!

Nurses   (776 Views 6 Comments)
by timetofly timetofly (New Member) New Member

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Apparently there are many different routes you can take to become a nurse, my goal would be an RN, but there are schools(American Career/Concorde Colleges, etc.) out there that off the LVN and say its faster to become an RN that way. I am now almost thirty, making a life change and want to easier route, for me. I know in San Diego there is a school called Meric that puts you into the RN program without all of the other prerequisites (besides like taking an EMT test). I live in Los Angeles, and am wondering what he best and sorry to say quickest route, would be fore me? I am so confused on how to do this! Anyone live in Los Angeles and can help?

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Going the LVN route is not a faster way to get your RN. The fastest route would be to take an accelerated RN program, not all schools offer this. It would also be faster to get your ADN, then finish your BSN later if you want it.

Getting your RN without the pre-reqs: keep in mind that most jobs in CA require graduation from an accredited school of nursing. I doubt that the program offered through Meric is accredited. If you go to the BON website: http://www.rn.ca.gov/ , they list all accredited programs in CA.

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Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

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The one reason it might be faster going the LVN to RN route would be the waiting lists are shorter for the LVN schools. If this is true where you live, then go the LVN route, and then go for the RN. Keep in mind there are pre-reqs to becoming an RN that you don't need to be an LPN, so it's still probably going to be a three year process.

Good luck!

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ann945n has 4 years experience as a RN and specializes in Nursing Ed, Ob/GYN, AD, LTC, Rehab.

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The fastest way to get through nursing school is to first apply to all the nursing programs you can LPN or RN (any level) chances are only one school (if you are lucky) will accept you your first year in applications. which ever one does go there and work that route, you can spend years trying to get into just one kind of program and could have already been done going a different route (trust me been there done that!)

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Natkat has 8 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in dialysis.

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The fastest way to get through nursing school is to first apply to all the nursing programs you can LPN or RN (any level) chances are only one school (if you are lucky) will accept you your first year in applications. which ever one does go there and work that route, you can spend years trying to get into just one kind of program and could have already been done going a different route (trust me been there done that!)

That's what I did. I applied to every nursing school in my area. It didn't matter in the end. I still wound up taking almost 4 years before finally being accepted. I began this endeavor at the age of 41. Now at age 46 I have one year of nursing school under my belt.

Better late than never......

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Faeriewand has 8 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in med/surg/tele/neuro.

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It almost sounds like you think you're getting too old! I am taking the LVN route to get thru it faster because the wait lists are soooo long. But I would rather be an RN. Now after I get thru LVN school I have to look forward to taking the NCLEX and then going to more school for another 3 semesters! And then taking the NCLEX again. LVN is 3 semesters. Just going straight for RN I would have had to go for 4 semesters. Almost sounds like that would have been better. But I just couldn't wait.

Yes the wait lists are long but as soon as you take the required classes and get your name on the wait lists then keep taking classes to get your associate degree. You need it anyway. Plus there are plenty more classes to take to get you to the BSN level.

You might want to try talking to students who have just gotten in the nursing programs. How long did they really have to wait? I know here in the San Diego area that they say the wait is 4 years but students report that they are getting in much sooner, even when the office people say no way will they get in this semester then they have gotten a call to come start. So you never know.

Good luck whatever you decide. :)

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