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Grading Changed to Pass/Fail?

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by sdgirl1 sdgirl1 (New) New

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Hi! I'm wondering if any of the BSN or ADN programs in CA have gone to Pass/Fail grading for the remainder of the semester?

Several medical schools and law schools have changed their grading systems to pass/fail for the remainder of the semester to help students out that are juggling more than ever before. Curious if any nursing schools have done the same.

Thanks!

Vanessa

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4 Followers; 37,678 Posts; 103,011 Profile Views

I don't see how this helps students. I think it is to ease the instructor workload. Now, easing requirements for grade of "Incomplete" might be helpful.

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534 Posts; 2,385 Profile Views

On 3/29/2020 at 12:59 PM, caliotter3 said:

I don't see how this helps students. I think it is to ease the instructor workload. Now, easing requirements for grade of "Incomplete" might be helpful.

Pass/fail classes typically don't affect your GPA. Unless you're right on the verge of graduating with honors, it really doesn't matter. And if you're failing and depending on these grades to get your GPA back up to a passing level, then it can matter. But I can't see any school not making exceptions or giving an option to get a letter grade in these situations.

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4 Followers; 37,678 Posts; 103,011 Profile Views

Required courses are usually annotated "May not be taken Pass/Fail". If one's degree program requires a letter grade, they are not accomplishing anything with a "Pass" grade, if that is the case.

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1 Article; 183 Posts; 4,017 Profile Views

22 hours ago, caliotter3 said:

Required courses are usually annotated "May not be taken Pass/Fail". If one's degree program requires a letter grade, they are not accomplishing anything with a "Pass" grade, if that is the case.

If medical schools, law schools and other prestigious universities like Harvard are doing pass/fail classes, I don't see why most nursing schools can't do that. Keep in mind students are people too who are being affected by Covid19.

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SnipRN has 1 years experience and specializes in Dialysis.

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I am doing the RN to BSN program at Washington State University. Many of the programs are now offering a pass/fail option, but the nursing program is not. This is because many BSN students choose to go on for a masters or PhD, and admittance is largely dependent on GPA, which cannot be adequately measured with pass/fail grading systems. I am not sure if the same is true in California, but thought I would offer my two cents. 🙂

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

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I work for a school that is giving the students a choice. They can either take the letter grade or they can choose the P/F option this semester. And they don't have to make the same choice for all their classes. For example, if they are doing well in a class, they can choose to take the letter grade. And if they are barely passing another course, they can choose the P/F option for just that one course.

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M1ST3R3DW1N0_RN is a BSN and specializes in CVICU.

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Sounds like a good deal.

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Caprica6 has 10 years experience.

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At the end of the day, the courses are pass/fail. If you achieve a grade above the minimum requirement, you've passed.; if you don't, you've failed. The only thing that pass/fail affects is your overall GPA. Many nursing schools cannot change their grading system without it affecting their accreditation (which would potentially impact your ability to get your licence). Also, if you plan to go on to graduate school, GPA matters; pass/fail may affect your ability to get into graduate school....

Stay safe!

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45 Posts; 275 Profile Views

I think there are a lot of factors that come into play depending on your state. I live in Texas and a lot of students are under the impression that P/F affects GPA and/or chances of getting into graduate programs. I haven't looked into it, myself, as the need hasn't arisen (though I can't imagine how P/F doesn't mess with GPA). A non-nursing student shared a petition in my cohort's social media page to change the school's grading system to P/F and everyone was vehemently against it. 

As someone who is planning on becoming a CRNA, I don't want any P's on my transcript when the next applicant has A's and B's. Regardless of effect on GPA, pass/fail grades add a degree of uncertainty to your educational record. Did you make an A, or did you barely scrape by with a C? No matter how objective and fair an admissions process, that's a difficult impression to ignore.

Best of luck to you 🙂

Edited by Shan
correction of spelling error

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534 Posts; 2,385 Profile Views

Nursing students put way too much focus on GPA.  Your GPA is only one part of a way bigger picture.  Having a P for your classes during a pandemic isn't going really put you at much of a disadvantage over having an A.  Having a perfect 4.0 GPA isn't necessarily going to make getting into graduate school any easier than someone with a mix between As Bs and Cs.

Graduate programs are going to look at references, professional memberships and especially contributions, work experience, mentoring, and a lot of other things to decide who they're going to accept.  If you're expecting to get accepted based on your grades, you're going to be disappointed.  You with your perfect GPA who only focused on school can very possibly be passed over for the B&C student at the bare minimum GPA who's actively on his jobs shared governance committee and works to affect policy changes.  Or going for an FNP, having references from the doctors that you work with tells them a lot more than if you got an A instead of a B in a medsurg class.

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ThePrincessBride has 5 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

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Even graduate schools are going to a P/F system. My grad school is given us the option of choosing a letter grade or P/F. Because I am getting A's, I am choosing letter grades over "P" on my transcript.

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