Bariatric Residents

  1. We have one now. Took us a while to get prepared (after resident was admitted of couse) Are you seeing more? What are you doing to prepare? Any special policies or procedures?
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    About CoffeeRTC, BSN

    Joined: Jan '03; Posts: 3,744; Likes: 1,817
    RN LTC; from US

    11 Comments

  3. by   Rnltc
    Quote from michelle126
    We have one now. Took us a while to get prepared (after resident was admitted of couse) Are you seeing more? What are you doing to prepare? Any special policies or procedures?
    Of course it is after the resident has arrived. Will the bed fit through the room door. Let me guess they are medicaid as well. As well, they will be on the call light 24/7 wanting every thing done for them and NOW.
  4. by   KRVRN
    Well, that was a little degrading.
  5. by   akcarmean
    I am a nurse and I am doing the steps to go through the bariatric procedure. Believe me I will not be on the call bell 24/7 I will want to help myself and get healed so that I can be home with my family and getting a good start on the rest of the program. The program takes a lot of hard work and strength to even get to the point of the surgery. Please give people more credit. Yes I do have a medical card, I am in school full time, my husband works full time and I work per-diem but we just cant make it with the way things are right now in today society. Just b/c people have a medical card doesn't mean they lay around allday and do nothing and sponge off the system. NOt all people do that.

    Angie
  6. by   CoffeeRTC
    Hey...lets get back to my OP. Bariatrics in LTC/ elderly patients..'kay? Anyone with more info?
  7. by   akcarmean
    NO sorry Michelle I don't have any. Havn't made it that far in my journey to give any info and havn't taken care of anyone who has had the surgery. Hope someone can give you the information u are looking for.


    Angie
  8. by   CoffeeRTC
    Thanks, I'm doing some looking. Good Luck to you...hope all is well!
  9. by   Rnltc
    It depends on which type of procdure they had. Plus why do they need nursing home care and not at home with home health. You should be able to get something from the center who did the surgery. I am sorry I did not understand your first posting as into the Bariatric procdure. I read it to mean bariatric resident in general on P&P for caring for Bariatric residents.
  10. by   CoffeeRTC
    Quote from Rnltc
    It depends on which type of procdure they had. Plus why do they need nursing home care and not at home with home health. You should be able to get something from the center who did the surgery. I am sorry I did not understand your first posting as into the Bariatric procdure. I read it to mean bariatric resident in general on P&P for caring for Bariatric residents.
    Sorry...that is what I meant. What I really meant to ask is how are you caring for the morbidly obese (that is the doc dx...one I would also have :uhoh21: ). Not just the ones who have had surgery done.
  11. by   MickyB-RN
    Quote from michelle126
    We have one now. Took us a while to get prepared (after resident was admitted of couse) Are you seeing more? What are you doing to prepare? Any special policies or procedures?
    There's a LTC facility near me that has a bariatrics program. Many of the patients come in before the surgery needing to lose weight first in order to even have the surgery. I think alot of emotional support is needed in this area. Even though these people have made up their minds that they want the surgery, it is still a scary time for many of them and I think they could use more one on one when available. Just my thoughts from my experiences with a few pts. before the surgery. hth's


    Kelly
  12. by   Antikigirl
    I am confused a bit...are you speaking of general direct care for a bariatric patient? Like what type of equipment, services, needs they need daily?

    We had one, but typically our residents are not. She had to have special equipment made for her size (a typical hoyer sling wouldn't suffice, a electric wheel chair wasn't strong enough..and so on) and we were able to get it all within time (and don't forget you need to rely on those companies for maintence..which can be costly!). We had to go through special training for Caregivers to work with this equipment, and really teach proper skin care for folds (which can break down or irriate so easily if not treated daily), transfers, how to take vs in the larger patient, and many remiders of dignity issues and to be mindful, respectful and compassionate.

    She was a handful though, post stroke with right side paralyisis, a good 400lbs, and all that special equipment kept breaking down and we were seirously stuck with limitations on care with that equipment not being functional (like the vanderlift...oh if that went we all, patient and staff, were like "OH NO!". OR a lovely caregiver forgetting to plug in her electric wheelchair..which was a Godsend...oh if that went down she didn't get to go anywhere!). But we would all use our critical thinking techiques, find new and better ways of doing things (she tried to help, but was rather nonverbal...but she was pretty nice about trying things out!).

    But all and all...she was just great, well loved, and we just did what was necessary as a team to help her! So it wasn't that big of a deal...just getting use to it all was the tough part. But once we got the equipment, got use to it, got the right routine, hit the many skin issues that occured as they occured, got a very secure bed (she had a seizure disorder, and one time she collapsed the bed during one..poor dear!), and got to know her...it was just a matter of doing the routine and giving her a big old hug at the end of the day!

    Be patient, use all your resources to find reliable (costly sadly but it is what it takes for quality!) equipment, have them do as much as they can and have them as an active participant in their own care (not just physically, but mentally...don't let them feel powerless..involve them in choices, listen to their needs as they see them, encourge them to think of better ways...they usually have been ignored or chastized for a long time r/t weight bias...so involving them is such a huge relief and positive step in helping them regain their self esteeme and worth!), and always keep keen on new ideas on how to get things done!
  13. by   rmarz
    When you say "fold care" what exactly are you doing?

    We have a bariatric woman in our LTC and the folds, the sweat, and the inability to turn much to remove pressure from a large area of her body... well it's creating wounds, go figure! We have been using Mepilix to some degree of success. But prevention would seem to be the key, the calmo and A+D doesn't seem to be too effective.

    Please let us know =D

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