Video Taping Nursing Students ? - page 2

I was talking to one of our on campus skills instructors and she told me that they are going to try to pilot something at our CC starting this fall. She says that instead of nursing students doing... Read More

  1. by   emmy27
    We don't do this for skill testing, but we do run simulator labs where we take care of the "patient" and our instructor controls the patient's responses via computer from the other side of a one-way mirror. We talk out loud about what we're doing and if we catch an error before we make it (and verbalize it so the instructor knows) we're not penalized, but they don't tell us anything over the intercom. We're expected to function independently and if we mess up, we have to deal with the mess we make, whether we realize why the patient is suddenly doing worse or not (which may mean calling the "doctor"- also our instructor- to report the decline in the patient's condition and receiving new orders to follow). Sometimes they video us, which is SO HARD to watch (who likes watching themselves on film, let alone on film making mistakes?).

    On the other hand, it's really valuable as a learning tool. I remember things I did in sim lab so much better than things I learned in class or even clinical, sometimes, because I'm functioning more independently and I don't expect there to be any kind of safety net- I know if, say, I prepare a med incorrectly, it won't just be a matter of the instructor chewing me out in the med room for preparing something wrong- in sim there's no one to check me, so I'll administer the med and the "patient" could die. In some ways it feels more real, on a gut level, than clinicals, where we're subordinate to others and always running our plan of care past more experienced people. I get way more nervous before sim than before clinicals, silly as that might sound!

    It's awkward at first, but try to get used to it- functioning alone in a room without your instructor there really is a good learning experience.
  2. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    I would need to remember to not pick my nose or scratch my butt or something, that would be embarrassing to watch back :stone
  3. by   NurseLoveJoy88
    Quote from ~Mi Vida Loca~
    I would need to remember to not pick my nose or scratch my butt or something, that would be embarrassing to watch back :stone
    LOL !
  4. by   JBudd
    Students tend to look at their instructors, to try to see if their reaction means the student is doing it right. Not having the instructor sitting there gives the student a chance to perform "on their own". Also, mistakes aren't fatal! And you get exposed to things that students may never have a chance to see. If a live patient starts to crump, students tend to get pushed out of the way, if they're lucky they can watch from a distance most of the time. Sim lets you keep going instead of losing control.

    Our students seem to like sim very much, and want more time with it. Its a safe place to learn, but feels very real.
  5. by   buttercup99
    Emmy27: We do run simulator labs where we take care of the "patient" and our instructor controls the patient's responses via computer from the other side of a one-way mirror. We talk out loud about what we're doing and if we catch an error before we make it (and verbalize it so the instructor knows) we're not penalized, but they don't tell us anything over the intercom. We're expected to function independently and if we mess up, we have to deal with the mess we make, whether we realize why the patient is suddenly doing worse or not (which may mean calling the "doctor"- also our instructor- to report the decline in the patient's condition and receiving new orders to follow).
    I would love that kind of simulated experience. Especially if it wasn't marked. But if it was I could probably handle that too. It would be so fun! As long as it wasn't worth a huge percentage of the mark.

    And that is so true about getting the chance to follow the case through even if they decline seriously. You would get to practise extending your critical thinking skills further than usual without any risk of injury to the pt.

    We have simulated wards where the students who play the patient get a page with a whole background, past Medical Hx, etc and it might say that 10 minutes after the session starts, you should try to get out of bed and walk to the toilet and fall or start complaining about your IV site. I was a pt who just had a hip replacement and I had to keep taking the triangle pillow out and lying on my side. The student nurse tried to put me on my side with the pillow there, ROFL!!! It just looks hilarious! And we have fake medications, fake ampoules (all labelled) and all the documentation to fill out (fluid balance, incident report, neurological and neurovascular obs etc etc.) That was one day of our workshop, the next day we did actvities such as a research of evidence based practice, a pre-op interview and a case conference re lady w/dementia.

    So, that's about as "realistic" as our workshops get.

    Nurse educators are always looking for innovative ways to deliver and assess the curriculum. Some ways are fun, some are "what the..?", some are fantastic ways to really engage with the material.

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