How Did You Pass Pathophysiology??

  1. Can you please share what you did and how you did it, to pass this class.
  2. Visit SA2BDOCTOR profile page

    About SA2BDOCTOR

    Joined: Aug '06; Posts: 410; Likes: 18

    28 Comments

  3. by   luvmyguys
    hi-I am taking it right now and getting a B maybe even an A. I study a lot and draw my own "impact loops" helps me understand what causes what, other than that, just study!!!
  4. by   RN28MD
    I suggest you tape the lecture. That helped me a lot. Also do all of the study quetions and ask for help as soon as you know you are in trouble. I did study groups but most of the time ended up talking about our bad day at clinicals. So if you do groups make sure you have your questions ready to compare and review. Good luck
  5. by   DianeMyra
    I read assigned material twice. It took a lot of time, but on the second time through I got many "ah ha" moments which helped me understand interrelated concepts. ~ Diane
  6. by   richardjboro1
    Patho to me is EASY, but our prof posts a study guide, and quiz questions, as well as gives quizzes before each test that come from the actual test. So she prepares us in many ways, as long as we take the resources she gives us. I'm passing with a high A right now.

    I guess it's all about who and how it's taught. I hear the nursing patho teacher just reads the notes to the class and gives the test. I'm taking the medical patho, which is actually taught by an OD doc, not a phD doc.. so... she's been there, done that, and actually enjoys teaching.

    Good luck,
    Richard
  7. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    Thank you ALL for your comments. I know that there is no short to passing this course, that one indeed have to study. Thank you for sharing the ways, that I can enhance my method of studying.
  8. by   pattymac
    When I took patho many years ago, it was straight lecture, no study guides, no pre-prepared notes, no nothing. So I went to someone that was making really good grades and asked if I could watch her study. We went to the library and I watched as she copied her notes over and over again. Each time she did that she would pick up something that didn't make sense and research it. Then the next time she would add the information to the notes that she was re-writing. I started doing the same and what I realized is that after awhile the notes became very concise and contained only the truly relevant information. And, most importantly, I really knew the material. I made an A in the class along with only a handful of people. Up until that time I had a C. I am in grad school now and that is how I continue to study for my most difficult classes if they are lecture based. On average I would say I copy my notes about 4-5 times minimum. (I am making A's) But then I am a visual, tactile person and maybe that has something to do with it. I have tried recording the lecture, but I don't find that helpful. Try different things and find one that really works for you.
  9. by   MikeyJ
    I haven't taken Patho yet (start it in a few weeks though -- eek!). However, I agree with previous posters that you really need to figure out what type of learning style works best for you. Some people are audible learners, meaning they can literally listen to a lecture and comprehend everything while the instructor teaches it, and do very well with minimal reading and "studying".

    I am not an audible learner at all -- in fact, I find going to lecture almost pointless for me because I literally do NOT learn a single thing because I am unable to stay focused to what the professor is saying. I still attend lectures to ensure I don't miss something important that may not be in readings, but I am a very visual learner. I need to see processes drawn out -- and I am very A-type, so I need to have my notes in a very concise and linear manner. I just study my notes like crazy, and draw out diagrams when needed. I also find that looking at the material every other night really helps as well.
  10. by   Skrawberri
    I've decided that classes like this... ALL depend on your instructor. Our class was called Clinical Phys, I guess it's the same thing. My teacher was HORRIBLE!! She was a great teacher and gave good notes, but her tests were ludicrous!! All that A, B, C, 2 of the above, none of the above crap!!! I struggled and made a C because I just could not get use to her testing style, but others barely studied and made an A. I was so jealous!!

    Just read over the notes. Over and over.
  11. by   s5995
    This thread is helpful.
  12. by   shoegalRN
    To the OP: You will be attending the same school where I am taking Patho now. I will send you a PM with some advice.

    But for me, I have a B average in the class right now before any quizzes are factored into my grade. I study an average of 16 hours a week on Patho. This is what works for ME:

    I do my study guide before class. I just skim over the material, fill out the study guide, do my pre-class quiz and then head off to class. I use a different color pen to add notes during lecture. I also do all the case studies the teacher provide with the lecture. After class, (maybe the next day or so), I'll go over the study guide again (with a fine tooth comb) and I'll reread the chapter again and highlight and underline things I need to grasp a concept on. I'll make up my note cards at this time. During this time, I'll also go to my dandy "Patho Made Incredibly Easy" book for a laymen's understanding. Now, after spending 6 hours or so doing this, I'll take my index cards I've made up to the gym with me and stay in the gym for about an hour just doing cardio. I spend 15 minutes at different machines and I just tune everything out (I also listen to my Ipod at this time) and I'll just keep going through my index cards until I've got it down pat. So, I knock out 2 birds with one stone, I work out and I study at the same time.

    Then, the final step is I'll type my studyguide up and I'll type up what I had to fill out in different colors as well as highlight it. (I'm a very visual learner). I also add some things from the Made Easy book into my typed study guide. I'll print it and then take that to the gym with me and do cardio for an hour.

    Finally, to make sure I really KNOW everything, I'll fill out a blank study guide from memory. If I can't recall something from memory, then I'll just focus on that concept alone. Again, back to the gym with index cards and/or study guide for an hour. This is just for ONE study guide. Normally, I'll spend about 2 days average on each study guide.

    This has worked wonders for me.
    Last edit by shoegalRN on Apr 29, '07
  13. by   greenemerald
    I was fortunate enough to have an excellent patho instructor whose lecture always made sense to me. Besides taking notes in class, I tape record the lecture and listen to it walking to class, driving, etc. Then I also review my notes after class and before class. That helped me a lot.:spin:
  14. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    Pattymac~

    When you say re-write the notes, is it the notes that you take in class during a lecture. Or notes that you take from the text or a combination of both?

    Quote from pattymac
    When I took patho many years ago, it was straight lecture, no study guides, no pre-prepared notes, no nothing. So I went to someone that was making really good grades and asked if I could watch her study. We went to the library and I watched as she copied her notes over and over again. Each time she did that she would pick up something that didn't make sense and research it. Then the next time she would add the information to the notes that she was re-writing. I started doing the same and what I realized is that after awhile the notes became very concise and contained only the truly relevant information. And, most importantly, I really knew the material. I made an A in the class along with only a handful of people. Up until that time I had a C. I am in grad school now and that is how I continue to study for my most difficult classes if they are lecture based. On average I would say I copy my notes about 4-5 times minimum. (I am making A's) But then I am a visual, tactile person and maybe that has something to do with it. I have tried recording the lecture, but I don't find that helpful. Try different things and find one that really works for you.

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