Discouraged BSN student

  1. Hi everyone! I just wanted to share my story of frustration and ask for any advice about what I should do.

    I am currently enrolled in a 4 year BSN program. In 2 weeks, I will start my first semester of my last year. So basically I'm a senior. I'd say I've done okay but I am definitely not an excellent student. I've done well in some classes but I am really not proud of the marks I've gotten in my main nursing (not prerequisite)classes like labor and delivery, psychiatric, medical-surgical clinicals. I have earned passing marks... just C's... Just enough to get by. I have felt this way for a while and I've done my best to improve it but I haven't improved much. I've brought my nursing care class grades from a C+ to a B-. I'm going to try my best in my last year but it seems like this is all I am. An C student. I've dreamed of working in the ICU after passing NCLEX and going on to graduate school but now I feel like maybe nursing is not for me but its way too late to start over. Instead of looking forward to the future ahead of me, I just look back at the mistakes I've made and dwell on them. Has anyone else felt this way?
    Last edit by Nurseanac on Jul 5
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    About Nurseanac

    Joined: Jul '18; Posts: 3
    from NJ , US

    15 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    What makes you think ICU is concerned with your GPA? In my experience, they are not.
  4. by   caliotter3
    Don't put the nail in the coffin of what could be a very satisfying career. School is not the job. Just because you did not "excel" at academia, does not mean you won't find satisfaction on the job. And if you don't find everything you ever wanted on the job, keep in mind that any job is necessary to pay the rent and put food on the table. You can build life satisfaction with what you do on your time off the job. All up to you and your attitude toward it all. Concentrate on graduating and keep up your efforts at improvement.
  5. by   Nurseanac
    @meanmaryjean I always thought that those with high GPA have a higher chance of getting hired in specialty areas like PICU NICU etc. Do ICU departments usually hire new graduates? May I ask you to tell me about your experience regarding this? Thank you for the reply anyway
  6. by   Nurseanac
    Quote from caliotter3
    Don't put the nail in the coffin of what could be a very satisfying career. School is not the job. Just because you did not "excel" at academia, does not mean you won't find satisfaction on the job. And if you don't find everything you ever wanted on the job, keep in mind that any job is necessary to pay the rent and put food on the table. You can build life satisfaction with what you do on your time off the job. All up to you and your attitude toward it all. Concentrate on graduating and keep up your efforts at improvement.
    I guess I really need to change my attitude about it. Thank you for the reply!
  7. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from Nurseanac
    @meanmaryjean I always thought that those with high GPA have a higher chance of getting hired in specialty areas like PICU NICU etc. Do ICU departments usually hire new graduates? May I ask you to tell me about your experience regarding this? Thank you for the reply anyway
    I have been a nurse for over 4 decades and had a LOT of jobs. Never once have I been asked about my GPA. And I have worked NICU, PICU and adult ICU/ CCU. Specialty area hiring of new grads is totally site specific- some do and some don't. You have a better chance if your capstone is on a specialty area- but even that doesn't factor at some places. Networking is critical.

    You got this- C's get degrees!
  8. by   KBurns775
    Keep your nose in the books and get that degree!

    C's don't mean you don't still have what it takes to be a competent and caring nurse. We all know the tests can be enough to make you pull your hair out, but don't let that discourage the time and effort you've already put in to the program. If you still want to go to Graduate School once you're done with the BSN and working as a nurse, please know this...there are often "EXCEPTIONS TO POLICY"...as in...just because the application site says you have to have a 3.0, doesn't mean you wouldn't still be able to apply. Talk to the program Director! Your experience and referrals in the profession will go a long way if and when you determine that you want to apply to a grad program.

    There's a reason for all those memes about Nursing school being the only place that "A" students cheer for "C's". It's difficult! But it's manageable! Just keep going and tell yourself you've got this!
  9. by   MiladyMalarkey
    I know a nurse who failed a semester of NS & first new grad RN job was in ICU, this nurse did well there. Just because you get C's does not indicate you won't be a good nurse. On the other hand I've seen over achievers with straight A's who have no idea how to interact with patients...or people for that matter. Everyone is different. I'd wait on throwing in the towel. We as students probably don't get our real education until we have RN already behind our name & are on the floor. Hang in there, good luck.
  10. by   hopeless13
    Don't think you can't be a competent nurse just because you have a C average

    you know what they call a nurse with a 3.0 GPA who passes the NCLEX? (...RN)

    what do they call a nurse with a 4.0 GPA who passes the NCLEX? (...RN?)

    hmmmm....

    do I have any idea what my preceptors GPA was? nope.

    You might also be horrified (maybe not) to find out that I'm a better student than you GPA wise (a 3.8) but I'm considering not becoming a nurse because my preceptor for my final practicum just failed me at midterm for having below average assessment skills, clinical acumen, clinical decision making (list goes on).

    i actually agreed with her. Shes a great nurse. But Im' going to give myself a second shot because after I spent a week and half moping around I realised that I can't give up because one person says I'm not up to scratch (my school is transferring me to another unit and making me do a bunch of remediation in lab etc to prove my skills). I owe it to myself to see if I can reflect on what went 'sideways' and see if I can improve.

    and you can too. don't give up - you deserve to chase your dreams
  11. by   elkpark
    The only time your grades might count in employment is in the case of some (certainly not all) new grad residency/internship programs. Usually, no one cares what your grades were as long as you are licensed.

    However, having said that, if you are unhappy with your grades (and if you have any thoughts of applying to graduate school later on), have you talked to your instructors about any advise or guidance they may have? Does your school have a student academic center that can help you with your study skills? Does the nursing program offer any tutoring? There is usually some help available.

    Best wishes for your journey!
  12. by   forevergreatful
    hey you are passing the class, nursing school is graded way more harder than other majors such as needing to stay above a 75 or 80 depending on the program. Keep hanging in there. You will be an amazing nurse majority of the stuff you will use in your job will be taught to you in the field. School is teaching you the basics in a short period of time and they know that everything isn't going to stick. Its too much At one time. keep pushing you got this. Almost see the light at the end of the tunnel. Don't compare yourself to the people around you. Keep focus and remember why you started and what it took to get to where your at.
  13. by   peachtreednurse
    As with everyone posting I agree you should go forward...Winners win by an inch, a vote, a point, many times surprising no-one but themselves.You're approaching the finish line, dig in, push past the negativity and win your RN BSN.
  14. by   nalie2
    Don't be so hard on yourself. Your GPA won't matter much unless you want to get into a new grad residency program and for your MSN well, how has your cumulative GPA been? I've seen most school require a 3.0 and trust me, you aren't the only nursing student struggling to keep up their GPAs. They don't look at just nursing grades.

    I am a recent new grad and I've been on about 6 interviews and not once have they asked for my GPA. I have been offered a job in Med-Surg, SNF, ICU, clinics and ER. My experience is minimal compared to the other experienced nurses but it seems like they have also agreed GPAs are not much of a concern. Just focus on doing well in school, grasping the content, applying it in clinicals and getting your license. Your license is the most important thing, not your GPA. Good luck to you!

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