Auditory exams in nursing schools

  1. I proved to my instructor that having exams read aloud to me was a success in passing the exams. I had a theory and put it to test with nursing director/instructor and I did exceptionally well. I have only had this issue with second level nursing class and cannot explain why. I have been tested for ADHD, ADD, and other neuro cognitive test to rule out any other learning disabilities and scored in normal to above average in most testing categories. After being read exam type questions, including " all that apply" questions I answered 49 out of 50 correctly, yet if I read the questions, the amount of correct answers dropped to anywhere from 30/50 range resulting in a failing theory average. Knowing this my instructor did nothing to help. I feel that she failed me as an educator and instructor. Why would any instructor not back up a student and do what took to help student be successful. I had a 98.9 total average in course and only needed the test and exams read aloud. I proved it.
    We were taught that people have different ways of learning at different times for different things and we as "nurses" need to know this when it comes to clients both during clinicals and when we are a actually an R.N. after nursing school. Why does this not apply to us as nursing students? What can I do about this? I'm having to appeal this and/ or apply to another school?
  2. Visit soldiergirl69 profile page

    About soldiergirl69

    Joined: Apr '18; Posts: 1
    from VA , US

    8 Comments

  3. by   Here.I.Stand
    Because as an adult learer, you are expected to hold more accountability for your learning. You are free to adjust your study strategies to your learning style however.

    Because that would be EXTREMELY distracting for every other student in class. It would deprive them of a quiet environment in which to concentrate.

    Because you aren't entitled to any help above what other students have. You have no documented disability.

    Because nobody is going to read your NCLEX questions to you.

    Because nobody is going to sit on your shoulder in a hospital room, asking you the questions that you will need to formulate in your own head, when your pt needs you to critically think.

    Because maybe, just maybe, if you can't pass the tests by reading the questions yourself -- the way exams have been administered since the dawn of formal education -- it's a clue that you simply don't know the material.
  4. by   Here.I.Stand
    I am an auditory learner myself. In school, I would read my notes aloud (at home, of course). Hearing the material in my voice coupled with reading the notes really helped solidify things.
  5. by   Nature_walker
    Unless you have documentation that you have a learning disability and that is part of you accommodations, you will not get your tests read. Even with a learning disability accommodations, you might only get a seperate space or extra time.

    I have a documented learning disability and I refused to get extra accommodations because I know the real world won't stop to give me extra time. I've learned how to work with it and adapt for what I need to do. I don't expect the world to adapt to me because I need a little extra help with reading and writing.
  6. by   broughden
    Are the doctors or your fellow nurses going to read the patient's records to you or orders to you when at work?
    You need to train yourself to read, comprehend and pay attention to details.
  7. by   meanmaryjean
    Who is going to read aloud to you in the clinical environment? Just curious
  8. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from Nature_walker
    Unless you have documentation that you have a learning disability and that is part of you accommodations, you will not get your tests read. Even with a learning disability accommodations, you might only get a seperate space or extra time.

    I have a documented learning disability and I refused to get extra accommodations because I know the real world won't stop to give me extra time. I've learned how to work with it and adapt for what I need to do. I don't expect the world to adapt to me because I need a little extra help with reading and writing.
    Good for you! I don't think that allowing a separate quiet room or the like is doing anyone any favors. Pts don't care if you need a quiet environment -- especially when they are coding.
  9. by   CelticGoddess
    Why doesn't this apply to nursing students? Well, when you have proof that you need accommodations, they're probably more likely to work with you.

    However, you have no documented evidence that you require this accommodation. And what would your plan be for NCLEX? If you are having issues with comprehending or absorbing what you are reading, what are you going to do when you have to read your patients chart? Do you think your coworkers will have time for that?

    And as far as patients being accommodated. I can see a HUGE difference between a student and a patient. When I teach my patients and their family about meds or the services we provide, *I* need to be assured they understand (especially since my patient population tends to be on morphine and ativan). With a student, that is on the student. YOU need to be sure you understand the material.
  10. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from soldiergirl69
    I proved to my instructor that having exams read aloud to me was a success in passing the exams. I had a theory and put it to test with nursing director/instructor and I did exceptionally well. I have only had this issue with second level nursing class and cannot explain why. I have been tested for ADHD, ADD, and other neuro cognitive test to rule out any other learning disabilities and scored in normal to above average in most testing categories. After being read exam type questions, including " all that apply" questions I answered 49 out of 50 correctly, yet if I read the questions, the amount of correct answers dropped to anywhere from 30/50 range resulting in a failing theory average. Knowing this my instructor did nothing to help. I feel that she failed me as an educator and instructor. Why would any instructor not back up a student and do what took to help student be successful. I had a 98.9 total average in course and only needed the test and exams read aloud. I proved it.
    We were taught that people have different ways of learning at different times for different things and we as "nurses" need to know this when it comes to clients both during clinicals and when we are a actually an R.N. after nursing school. Why does this not apply to us as nursing students? What can I do about this? I'm having to appeal this and/ or apply to another school?
    I'm also VERY curious about the methodology of this. Did you fail the written-only exam and then get 49/50 correct in the post-test review? Because the only way this is valid is if you got the exact same exam twice, and then you introduce bias from previous exposure. How EXACTLY did you 'prove' this?

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