What do you think about people calling you "honey"? - page 4

I am in my forties, but a lot of people (such as waitresses, sales clerks, cashiers) call me "honey" and "sweetheart" all the time. I think this is fine, when the person is older than me, but I get... Read More

  1. by   nursemike
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    I so wanna work with you!

    I used to get a little frustrated when people referred to my unit as the "crazy peoples' floor." We're neuro/neurosurg, not psych. Lately, though, I'm beginning to think they may not be referring to our patients. Oh, well, if the shoe fits...


    It occurs to me that my previous post was more about how I address people than how I feel about being addressed. "Honey," or "Hon" seems pretty popular among restaurant servers and doesn't bother me. I've actually heard it from male servers a time or two, but I'm supremely confident in my masculinity. Well, I try not to let it bug me, at least.

    One of our medicine residents I occassionally run into always greets me "Good morning, sir." He appears to be foreign-born, and I suppose he comes from a more formal culture than I'm used to. Seems a bit odd, at first, but it's nice to see someone respect his elders, even though I'm still adjusting to the idea of being an elder.

    One think I notice is that while I almost always sign my name Michael and introduce myself that way, 99.99% of the people I meet call me Mike. I don't mind a bit, but I fell in love with the last person who routinely called me Michael.
    I do sign my charts "Mike..." though. Every second counts.
  2. by   jnette
    Quote from justavolunteer
    I'm 'justavolunteer' on a pt. unit. I have had nurses call me 'dear', 'sweetie' and other such terms because they are so appreciative of my help. Compared to some of the things I was called in the military by my superiors, I'll take 'honey' or 'sweetie' any day!
    baaaaaaaaaaahahaah !! Yeppers, I must agree !

    Quote from stevielynn
    I agree and also agree with those who made comments about:

    CONTEXT:spin:

    There has been a thread about this before and at the risk of repeating myself, I have to say we DO call our elderly patients "Honey, sweetie", etc.

    Unless someone requests us not to, of course.

    Ma'am was hard to get used to . . .. but I'm not going to make a big deal out of it.

    It does bother me a bit that I can't say "Good luck girls" to my daughter's softball team . . .you MUST call them "ladies".

    Sometimes political correctness rubs me the wrong way more than "Honey".


    steph
    Agree there as well. PCness takes the joy out of things, doesn't it?
    Ah well.

    As for Ma'am, Sir, etc... I still love to address ppl this way.. even at MY old age! :chuckle
    Guess that's still the strict military and Austrian upbringing in me.

    Taught my children to do the same, and ppl are amazed when they actually hear a young person with some respect..even though they are no longer so "young". But they, too, enjoy using these, and the pleasant reaction it brings from those they address.
  3. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from jnette
    baaaaaaaaaaahahaah !! Yeppers, I must agree !



    Agree there as well. PCness takes the joy out of things, doesn't it?
    Ah well.

    As for Ma'am, Sir, etc... I still love to address ppl this way.. even at MY old age! :chuckle
    Guess that's still the strict military and Austrian upbringing in me.

    Taught my children to do the same, and ppl are amazed when they actually hear a young person with some respect..even though they are no longer so "young". But they, too, enjoy using these, and the pleasant reaction it brings from those they address.

    I do LOVE hearing kids say "Ma'am" and "Sir" . . . .I think it teaches respect.

    steph
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I call people younger and older than me "ma'am" and "sir." That's just how I was brought up. I was also taught that "honey" and "dear" are never used with a person who is older than you, so it just sits weird with me.

    My former NM cannot stand it when someone says "you guys." She told me that when she and her husband are out at a restaurant, if a waitress refers to them as "you guys" she witholds the tip.
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from nursemike
    . I don't mind a bit, but I fell in love with the last person who routinely called me Michael.
    I do sign my charts "Mike..." though. Every second counts.
    Hi Michael! :flowersfo

    My name is long . . . S t e p h a n i e . . . . I don't mind shortening it to "steph". My grandparents called me "stevie" or "stevielynn". Grandma also called me "sugar".

    My family is from Arkansas and Oklahoma . . . . I'm used to terms of endearment.

    steph
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I call people younger and older than me "ma'am" and "sir." That's just how I was brought up. I was also taught that "honey" and "dear" are never used with a person who is older than you, so it just sits weird with me.

    My former NM cannot stand it when someone says "you guys." She told me that when she and her husband are out at a restaurant, if a waitress refers to them as "you guys" she witholds the tip.

    I have to admit I don't like being called "Dude!" :trout:


    steph
  7. by   EmmaG
    Quote from stevielynn
    I do LOVE hearing kids say "Ma'am" and "Sir" . . . .I think it teaches respect.

    steph
    That's how I raised my kids... however, while I was attending my daughter's graduation from Army basic, I watched in fascination when a fellow civilian stopped her to ask a question. She snapped to, just about yessir'd him to pieces...

    After he went on, I looked at her and asked, "WHO are you and what did you do with my daughter???"
  8. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    That's how I raised my kids... however, while I was attending my daughter's graduation from Army basic, I watched in fascination when a fellow civilian stopped her to ask a question. She snapped to, just about yessir'd him to pieces...

    After he went on, I looked at her and asked, "WHO are you and what did you do with my daughter???"
    Well, that is typical . . . ..kids behave in public with all the great stuff you've taught them and then feel comfy enough to not do that at home. So, we are surprised by their polite behavior.

    People compliment my kids all the time . . .and I think the same thing. "Who are you and where is MY kid?".


    steph
  9. by   nursemike
    I'm not certain exactly when, but somewhere in the past decade or so, "cops" became "police officers" and started holding the door for me instead of asking what I was up to. I must say, "Can I see your license and registration, sir?" takes a little of the sting out of it.
  10. by   Diahni
    Quote from ericalynn
    I think it's annoying. My name is Erica, not honey, or sweetie, or whatever. And I find it demeaning when I hear other nurses calling patients honey, or sweetie. They also have names, use them, it shows respect.
    Right! And when did "it sucks" become something a kid could say without the mother getting out the soap? Today, the kid probably learned it from her. As for "you guys," I am amazed at the formal situations in which I've heard someone say this. Standard speech is going down the toilet with good manners, it seems. (I even heard a priest say he wasn't going to "bs" the congregation in a sermon!)
    Diahni
  11. by   Euskadi1946
    Being called 'HONEY" doesn't bother me in the least since I've been called the alternative on several occasions. There are more extremely important matters to worry about than being called "HONEY".
  12. by   leslie :-D
    most of the nursing assistants, call me "darling".
    i find myself addressing them as "sweetie".

    one time, i went to introduce a nursing assistant to a doctor, and realized i had forgotten her name.

    it is all contextual.
    if i don't care for someone, i would never think to use endearments.
    i use sugar on those i really, really like.

    leslie
  13. by   ERnewbieRN
    i really don't mind being "honey'd" or "sweetie'd," i actually kind of like it! i'm only 22 so it sits ok with me since most of my patients are quite a bit older than i am, and i also view it as a term of endearment rather than a diminutive term. unless they're saying it with an attitude...

    i refrain from calling people by those names if they're older than me, unless they are extremely distraught and i'm comforting them, or if they're a pediatric patient.

    i'd much prefer being called "honey" or "sweetie" than "nurse"... something about that just really irks me.

    oh, and i'm so guilty of the "you guys" thing... sorry!! we don't say "ya'll" up here so it's hard to find a term that encompasses a group of people, saying "you" to a group of 5 people just doesn't seem right

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