Wearing gloves with HIV positive patients - page 11

(First time writing here) Yesterday during my clinical, I was interviewing a HIV positive patient. Half way through, the primary nurse asked me to talk with her in the hall, and when we spoke she... Read More

  1. by   Orion81RN
    Quote from ICUman
    Wearing gloves will not make a patient "feel like crap" or feel bad about themselves. It is an everyday common practice in the hospital.

    Standard precautions should be observed for every patient interaction necessitating touch, which includes wearing gloves.

    Instructing a student to wear gloves does not make the nurse paranoid or ignorant.
    I have not read through the posts, so I'm sure someone has already quoted the CDC on this. However, I will do it still.

    "All health-care workers should routinely use appropriate barrier precautions to prevent skin and mucous-membrane exposure ******WHEN CONTACT WITH BLOOD OR OTHER BODY FLUIDS OF ANY PATIENT IS antici- ANTICIPATED.****** Gloves should be worn for touching blood and body fluids, mucous membranes, or non-intact skin of all patients, for handling items or surfaces soiled with blood or body fluids, and for performing venipuncture and other vascular access procedures. Gloves should be changed after contact with each patient. Masks and protective eyewear or face shields should be worn during procedures that are likely to generate droplets of blood or other body fluids to prevent exposure of mucous membranes of the mouth, nose, and eyes. Gowns or aprons should be worn during procedures that are likely to generate splashes of blood or other body fluids."

    Do you wear gloves when simply walking in a room and touching objects, or even shaking hands, with EVERY patient?
    If you do, then, yes, I would say you are either uneducated on transmission methods or....paranoid. I typically agree with your posts, but this one baffles me.

    And wearing gloves can ABSOLUTELY have an impact on a patient's emotions. WHERE are you getting otherwise?
  2. by   jubu97rn
    I had an STNA angry because no one told her a resident was HIV+. My question is: what would she do differently if she knew? She said "Well he has a rash on his balls." I'm glad she is not working in our facility anymore because apparently she doesn't routinely wear gloves when touching scrotums and who knows what else.
  3. by   juliezehrn
    Yay for the Hep C cure! Happy to hear you are well.
  4. by   psu_213
    Quote from jubu97rn
    I had an STNA angry because no one told her a resident was HIV+. My question is: what would she do differently if she knew? She said "Well he has a rash on his balls." I'm glad she is not working in our facility anymore because apparently she doesn't routinely wear gloves when touching scrotums and who knows what else.
    Off the topic--what exactly is a STNA?
  5. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from psu_213
    Off the topic--what exactly is a STNA?
    State tested nursing assistant, I believe. CNA with a different term. Kinda like LVN vs LPN. I believe there's also LNAs in some states.
  6. by   psu_213
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    State tested nursing assistant, I believe. CNA with a different term. Kinda like LVN vs LPN. I believe there's also LNAs in some states.
    Apparently they need to add a True/False item to the exams: "when touching a pt's genitals you don't have to wear gloves." (Always have more falses than trues.)
  7. by   jubu97rn
    State tested nurses aide. I work in a skilled nursing facility
  8. by   featherzRN
    I worked on an AIDS unit in the late 1980's. Even then, we didn't wear gloves for random patient chats or even things like chair transfers, etc. We did wear them for injections, IV's, etc. Still here! :P
  9. by   IVRUS
    Quote from TriciaJ
    I don't wear gloves for injections, either. Applying counter-pressure to the injection site with the alcohol swab before removing the needle seals it up fairly well. I think gloves are over-used and often used as substitutes for handwashing, which they shouldn't be.
    Tricia,
    One IS USUALLY exposed to bodily secretions when performing a SQ or IM injections, and gloves should be worn. In addition, alcohol promotes bleeding and it burns, so I wouldn't use it to "seal" the site s/p injection.
  10. by   Leader25
    "Do you wear gloves when simply walking in a room and touching objects, or even shaking hands, with EVERY patient"


    One does have to be prepared for the unexpected, as in a blood draw gone wrong, way wrong with exploding vial of HIV+ blood splattered all over,...hmmm just saying ,best be prepared.
  11. by   AlTennRN
    Or dramatic.
  12. by   Leader25
    You really think I posted that to be dramatic? What a remark. For those actually reading my post let me inform you that the situation described actually happened.True nursing has never been just "dramatic".
  13. by   Leader25
    You can not "anticipate" everything,like people that do not flush the toilet.

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