Staff Nurses Who Refuse To Precept Or Teach? - page 3

Of course I understand that not everyone wants to be a teacher or professor but a few of my coworkers lately have down right refused to precept or even be a resource to newer or less experienced... Read More

  1. by   getoverit
    I've always wondered if the nurses who don't like teaching or precepting also didn't like it when their teachers and preceptors were helping them learn new things.... Seems like a double standard at times
  2. by   llg
    Quote from getoverit
    I've always wondered if the nurses who don't like teaching or precepting also didn't like it when their teachers and preceptors were helping them learn new things.... Seems like a double standard at times
    Just because I have needed work done by a plumber (or substitute electrician, dentist, lawyer, car mechanic, etc.) in the past doesn't mean I am obligated to provide that service to others who need it now. The employer should provide educators/preceptors as needed and compensate them appropriately -- and not just pile on extra work for the already over-worked staff and expect them to do it for little or no compensation. Also, schools should not expect the staff to teach/supervise their students for free when they are charging the students for the education.
  3. by   gpsrn
    I am wondering if said nurse had a bad experience in the past with precepting and refuses to because of it. The thought of "nurses eat their young" is something I am reminded of here. This is such a sad thing in nursing. I have always wanted to work with new nurses and let them learn and I have learned from them. Teaching nurses is just not this person's best quality.
  4. by   getoverit
    Quote by LLG:
    Just because I have needed work done by a plumber (or substitute electrician, dentist, lawyer, car mechanic, etc.) in the past doesn't mean I am obligated to provide that service to others who need it now.

    I agree with your response with the above exception, I think you're kind of comparing apples to oranges on this one but here's another step to the progression of your comparison: if you happened to have used a plumber for work, then in the future needed a different plumber who seemed to have difficulty completing the job...if you knew a pointer or tip to help them you would be wise to do so. but I agree that you are not technically "obligated".
  5. by   WestCoastSunRN
    There's a difference, also, between nurses being expected to precept and nurses being expected to be decent human beings. Back to the OP's example of the new nurse getting an ICP drain.... ANY nurse who is familiar with that should be able to be a "resource" for someone new to it. That isn't precepting. That's being a half-way decent team player and giving a crap about the patient --- even if they are not YOUR patient.

    I understand some nurses not wanting to precept. It's not for everyone and I don't think all nurses should be mandated to do it. I think that just causes more problems as has been already well articulated by previous posters. But saying you're not going to be a resource? Or getting miffed when a new-to-your-unit nurse asks for some guidance or help? That's something altogether different. That's just lousy.
  6. by   Pepper The Cat
    Perhaps you should ask Ms Senior RN for permission to be a resource before volunteering her for the job.
  7. by   Viviana
    And people wonder why there is a nursing shortage...

    Some people are not good teachers, and they know this about themselves. You wouldn't want them teaching a new person. However, I think that people who are will to precept should be paid for their time. If your facility is not paying preceptors, that could be part of the problem.
  8. by   <3nursing <3
    I just finished precepting my 7th? (lost exact count) orientee in three years on an eight bed inpatient unit and 24 hour outpatient infusion unit. Recently we have experienced a large staff turnover due to hospital cutbacks and staff leaving for better paying positions. I do not receive any extra compensation for precepting. I am also expected to take my full patient load while precepting. Recently our techs were moved to another floor to "save money". Before I precepted my last orientee, I did say I refuse to precept. My reasons were partly selfish because I did not want to take on another job responsibility when I already feel overworked. Also, I did not feel I could provide the orientee with the proper attention she would need as a new nurse. Two more orientees started this week. I will not shoulder the sole responsibility of precepting this time, but I am expected to precept each day I work. Before making broad assumptions, there could be a multitude of reasons why a nurse does not want to precept.
  9. by   NurseDisneyPrincess
    I personally love to teach and precept, when I am given the opportunity to. Reason being is because I have had, like most, my fair share of bad teachers/instructors. Maybe they were "bad" because they were unhelpful/rude, or maybe they were "bad" in the way of they didn't know how to teach and their frustrations from that caused them to give up. In the end, it was always a good experience for me because it taught me what not to do.

    Here's how I tackle educating:

    I aim to be friendly so that they feel I am approachable. I try to practice patience. I answer questions to the best of my knowledge and ability. Most importantly, I don't boss but I teach and guide. If I have a criticism, I work on how to present it in a way that is not harsh and ridiculing.

    More importantly, if I don't succeed at anything else, I make sure to comfort my preceptee and let them know that they are going to be fine. A lot of times people need that extra reassurance because they are nervous and I have seen that make the difference, in attitude and performance.

    I don't think it matters much if you feel like you aren't great at explaining things or educating. Sometimes it's just the way you present yourself to someone that makes all the difference. I wish more nurses, regardless of whether or not they feel like they are capable of teaching, would volunteer at least once. You teach them, they teach you... you get the opportunity to pass on your knowledge and help someone new build their confidence, and they get to learn and gain experience. Everybody wins. What could be sweeter?

    Those nurses that are flat out refusing to do it just may not want the responsibility... or maybe, like I said, they don't think they will be able to teach in an effective way.
    Last edit by NurseDisneyPrincess on Dec 6, '17
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from getoverit
    I've always wondered if the nurses who don't like teaching or precepting also didn't like it when their teachers and preceptors were helping them learn new things.... Seems like a double standard at times
    It's not that simple. Clearly you don't know what you don't know. Precepting is a very difficult job, especially if you're trying to do it well (rather than collecting your $.75/hour for "babysitting" while the new nurse flounders). Some folks are good at it, others aren't. Some enjoy it; others tolerate it and a few hate it. Some nurses who enjoyed precepting have been precepting continuously for YEARS on end and are burned out and have begun to hate it.

    Precepting used to be rewarding, but these days new grads are more and more entitled. They want the preceptor to change her schedule to accomodate the newbie's preferences. They want any feedback wrapped in rainbows and sprinkled with fairy dust to the point where any NEGATIVE feedback can be ignored. Everything is all about "my learning" to the point where even the patient is lost in the shuffle. They rush to "report someone" every time they have a negative interaction because they're certain that every negative interaction is "bullying." Preceptors are then bullied by their orientees who are rushing to complain to the manager because "Ruby wouldn't eat lunch with me, WAH!" (My sister was in town for 24 hours for a conference at my hospital and I chose to have lunch with her so we could talk about my mother's latest nursing home eviction and where we might place her instead. I explained that, even though I shouldn't have had to. The orientee is an adult -- she can eat one meal by herself!) Or "Anne didn't say hello to me in the lobby!" (Anne had driven to work wearing her sunglasses, left them in the car and was headed up to the unit more or less by braille to put in her contacts. She didn't SEE the orientee, but probably would have greeted her warmly had the orientee said hello first.)

    Until you have actually precepted -- and tried to do it well -- you have NO idea. Perhaps it would be best not to rush to judgement until you have actually walked a mile in a preceptor's shoes.
  11. by   getoverit
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    It's not that simple. Clearly you don't know what you don't know. Precepting is a very difficult job, especially if you're trying to do it well (rather than collecting your $.75/hour for "babysitting" while the new nurse flounders). Some folks are good at it, others aren't. Some enjoy it; others tolerate it and a few hate it. Some nurses who enjoyed precepting have been precepting continuously for YEARS on end and are burned out and have begun to hate it.

    Precepting used to be rewarding, but these days new grads are more and more entitled. They want the preceptor to change her schedule to accomodate the newbie's preferences. They want any feedback wrapped in rainbows and sprinkled with fairy dust to the point where any NEGATIVE feedback can be ignored. Everything is all about "my learning" to the point where even the patient is lost in the shuffle. They rush to "report someone" every time they have a negative interaction because they're certain that every negative interaction is "bullying." Preceptors are then bullied by their orientees who are rushing to complain to the manager because "Ruby wouldn't eat lunch with me, WAH!" (My sister was in town for 24 hours for a conference at my hospital and I chose to have lunch with her so we could talk about my mother's latest nursing home eviction and where we might place her instead. I explained that, even though I shouldn't have had to. The orientee is an adult -- she can eat one meal by herself!) Or "Anne didn't say hello to me in the lobby!" (Anne had driven to work wearing her sunglasses, left them in the car and was headed up to the unit more or less by braille to put in her contacts. She didn't SEE the orientee, but probably would have greeted her warmly had the orientee said hello first.)

    Until you have actually precepted -- and tried to do it well -- you have NO idea. Perhaps it would be best not to rush to judgement until you have actually walked a mile in a preceptor's shoes.
    Ruby Vee, I have read your posts for many years and am a little taken aback by this one. I have been a preceptor for over 20 years and have received more than a couple awards for teaching/precepting. Not bragging on myself, just giving a little context for me to use your words back to you: clearly YOU don't know what you don't know and it would be best for YOU not to rush to judgment.
  12. by   NuGuyNurse2b
    Quote from getoverit
    Ruby Vee, I have read your posts for many years and am a little taken aback by this one. I have been a preceptor for over 20 years and have received more than a couple awards for teaching/precepting. Not bragging on myself, just giving a little context for me to use your words back to you: clearly YOU don't know what you don't know and it would be best for YOU not to rush to judgment.
    yeah but people like you and the OP are the ones who are judging. If someone doesn't want to precept they don't want to precept. I'm not sure why that is a hard concept to grasp. If I don't want to precept, I don't feel indentured to do so simply because another nurse taught me when I was new, which is basically your philosophy on this topic given what you wrote. Everybody has a part to play in the organization. This is why there are nurse educators and nurse preceptors: people who apply for and accept positions that allow them to do what they want. Where the line gets blurry (and has been pointed out here too) is when people who do not want to do so are tasked to do so - so they're forced to do something they don't like, are not even compensated fairly for it, and are tasked with taking on a full patient load of their own. That is not called being selfish or not being a team player or any of the other derisive adjectives that I've seen thrown around in this thread; it's unfair and unsafe.
  13. by   getoverit
    Quote from NuGuyNurse2b
    yeah but people like you and the OP are the ones who are judging. If someone doesn't want to precept they don't want to precept. I'm not sure why that is a hard concept to grasp. If I don't want to precept, I don't feel indentured to do so simply because another nurse taught me when I was new, which is basically your philosophy on this topic given what you wrote. Everybody has a part to play in the organization. This is why there are nurse educators and nurse preceptors: people who apply for and accept positions that allow them to do what they want. Where the line gets blurry (and has been pointed out here too) is when people who do not want to do so are tasked to do so - so they're forced to do something they don't like, are not even compensated fairly for it, and are tasked with taking on a full patient load of their own. That is not called being selfish or not being a team player or any of the other derisive adjectives that I've seen thrown around in this thread; it's unfair and unsafe.
    not sure why you feel that is a hard concept to grasp based on my post. I never said anyone should be tasked to precept when they don't want to, in fact I believe that they shouldn't have a student or new orientee assigned to them if that's the way they feel. I've had many nurses say they don't want a student and many students/orientees request a new preceptor. there's nothing wrong with that, I haven't suggested there is and your charge of me "judging" is totally off-base and ignorant (in my opinion, not a characterization of you, just of your comment about me).
    I'm not one who has said it's selfish or not being a team player. But I will say that if a nurse doesn't want to help someone learn a new skill/concept/procedure/etc then they don't appreciate the ones who taught them in a way that makes them want to return the favor for someone in a similar boat-to use your philosophy given what you wrote. That's not derisive, just a professional observation. But no one should be forced to precept someone else, it's not fair to either person.

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