Should I go for a BSN or RN-MSN since I hace a BS degree already?

  1. I am trying to grasp this whole concept of RN-BSN and RN-MSN to fit my future plans. I have a BS degree in Recreation therapy and now have my ADN. I want to go back for possibly Nursing Education, which requires a Masters. I am kinda confused. My hospital offers RN-BSN at Local State University for $2000. The university teacher comes to the hospital and we meet once a week for 12 months and then you get your BSN. I thought it was a great deal and could potentially save me alot of money. Or should I just wait and do the RN-MSN?

    If you had a BS degree and wanted to become a nurse educator. What would you do? I am so confused because people are saying not to waste time getting a BSN if I already have a BS degree. I guess I though the RN-BSN would be better because its like your taking baby steps to get to your ultimate goal.

    Would love some advice or opinions. Thanks!
  2. Visit NC Girl BSN profile page

    About NC Girl BSN

    Joined: Aug '07; Posts: 1,853; Likes: 970
    Neuroscience Staff Nurse; from US
    Specialty: Psych, LTC, Acute Care

    10 Comments

  3. by   Jubilayhee
    I agree with that bsn price sounding like a great deal. I'd take that
  4. by   cingle
    The price is right, but it doesn't get you where you need to go. If you're going to work hard for a year, you might as well get where you're going.

    There is a bridge program at Vanderbilt University (Nashville) that can get you from your BS to an MSN for nursing education. Check out the website at www.vanderbilt.edu and then click on colleges/schools - Nursing.
  5. by   Moogie
    Quote from cingle
    The price is right, but it doesn't get you where you need to go. If you're going to work hard for a year, you might as well get where you're going.
    Absolutely! If you know you want your MSN and already have a bachelor's in another field, go for the RN-MSN.

    I wish programs like that existed when I did my RN-BSN---would have skipped the middleman and gone straight for the Master's.
  6. by   philanurse74
    Just thought this one out long and hard, decided on the RN-MSN to teach also. Just go right for it.
  7. by   lamazeteacher
    "If you had a BS degree and wanted to become a nurse educator" quote from OP


    Since you're at an ideal age to continue your education (having done several types of HC), I'd check out the requirements to obtain your master's degree in education. If you enjoy teaching orientees to your unit, and believe you can achieve the degree, go for it!

    Many teachers have taught without really enjoying the educational process; and therefore are boring, distant mouthers of theory, seemingly uncaring whether it makes sense to learners.

    But save at least half the money needed to achieve your goal! Loans have to be repaid........ Work (but not on nights, unless you really acclimate to them well), in between semesters, to put double payments on it (be sure that's OK in the contract. A lot of resentment surfaces when graduates face huge repayment obligations, so be sure that you'll be able to work the loan off after the first year. Nursing instructors are a needed commodity, so government low interest loans are available, as well as scholarships.
  8. by   Mike A. Fungin RN
    If you want to teach you're going to need an MSN. Some places, they're even requiring a doctorate.
  9. by   Moogie
    Quote from Mike A. Fungin RN
    If you want to teach you're going to need an MSN. Some places, they're even requiring a doctorate.
    Mike's right. If you want to teach in a practical nursing program or an associate degree RN program, a MSN should be adequate. To teach in a baccalaureate program, you will definitely need your doctorate UNLESS you want to teach clinicals. Most baccalaureate programs are still hiring BSNs to teach clinicals, though they prefer MSNs.

    If you want to teach theory in most baccalaureate programs, you're looking at needing a doctorate. Not true for all programs but definitely the ones with which I have experience. Also, if you want to be a program director, you would probably need a doctorate as well.

    An MSN in nursing education would also prepare you to be a staff development coordinator or unit educator in a hospital or other institution should you decide you like teaching but not the politics of academe.
  10. by   NC Girl BSN
    Quote from Moogie
    Mike's right. If you want to teach in a practical nursing program or an associate degree RN program, a MSN should be adequate. To teach in a baccalaureate program, you will definitely need your doctorate UNLESS you want to teach clinicals. Most baccalaureate programs are still hiring BSNs to teach clinicals, though they prefer MSNs.

    If you want to teach theory in most baccalaureate programs, you're looking at needing a doctorate. Not true for all programs but definitely the ones with which I have experience. Also, if you want to be a program director, you would probably need a doctorate as well.

    An MSN in nursing education would also prepare you to be a staff development coordinator or unit educator in a hospital or other institution should you decide you like teaching but not the politics of academe.

    Thanks so much! I am leaning toward teaching in a hospital. Pt. ed or Staff development but either way, I want to educate someone.
  11. by   llg
    If you have experience in education and know that you would enjoy that career, I would go for the RN-MSN. It will save you time in the long ... and perhaps money by cutting down on the total number of courses you will need to end up where you want to be.

    However ... if you only THINK you MIGHT like education because it looks and sounds good ... then the RN-BSN options sounds worth taking. You coud some experience in the education field (precepting, unit educator, staff development, etc.) and see if you really liked it before investing in the Master's.

    A lot of new nurses think they would like teaching -- until they actually give it a try. The same is true of other advance roles (such as CRNA, CNS, NP, Administration). People looking only at the surface from the outside think they might like it -- but find they don't like it when they actually see "behind the scenes."

    Are you really ready to make that committment to a Master's that focuses on education? Or could you get a more generic Master's that would give you role flexibilitly after graduation? Those are things you should consider. I got a rather generic Master's many years ago in my clinical specialty that has allowed me to teach for nursing schools, be a CNS, do staff development, and do management. The MSN was not so specific that it locked me into a particular role.

    Be careful about locking yourself into something unless you have enough actual experience in the field to know that it will work out for you. Until then, either stay fairly generic in your choice of an RN-MSN program ... or get the cheap, convenient BSN and get some more experience before locking in a Master's track.

    Some RN-MSN programs let you "quit" or "take a break" after you get the BSN ... then continue later to finish the MSN portion ... and let you choose your MSN track after taking that break. I like those options.
  12. by   NC Girl BSN
    Good Point llg. What did you get a Masters in? I am leaning toward the RN- BSN for now because its convient and inexspensive.(cost $2000 and the hospital reinbuses $1500)Then I could try to get a job in a area that allow me to educate like a clinic or Nursing Home Staff Development to gain experience.I would love to teach CPR or orientation. I have some expereince teaching when I was a recreation therapist on a psych unit for 5 yrs. I taught life skills, stress management and co-lead group therapy with the nurses and social worker. I just don't want to do bedside nursing for the rest of my life. I want to do it for at least another 5 yrs to get experience, stay PRN and then move on.

    I really have alot of thinking to do. Thanks for all your opinions!

close