Ok, I am a little creeped out!

  1. Hi,

    So I know there is whole thread on ghost stories, but i figured I would post this since it just happened.

    I was working as a medic and we picked up a patient who had collapsed. The patient was cyanotic from the clavicles up, so I assumed they probably had a massive PE. They had a pulse, but was unresponsive and very hypotensive (systolic of 50). We ventilated them and put them in our ambulance and they suddenly woke up, although they still had the monks cloak cyanosis. When the person initially woke up they were trying to get up off the stretcher while holding a hand out to the ambulance ceiling all while yelling for a particular name. the patient eventually became more alert, although still severely hypotensive and cyanotic, but able to answer questions and no longer yelling that persons name. The patient lost consciousness again in the ambulance, but woke up again, but it was brief and no yelling someones name this time.

    The patient coded at the hospital, as we assumed they would since there isn't much we can do for such a massive PE in a community hospital, assuming that is what it was.

    I looked at the obituary today and the name of the person the patient was yelling for was their previous spouse who is DEAD!

    Creepy!

    Annie
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    About AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P

    Joined: Oct '06; Posts: 2,602; Likes: 3,890

    36 Comments

  3. by   AlphaM
    Nothing creepy about it, if I was dying I'd be calling my wife's name too, plus a brain that's deprived of oxygen will play all kinds of tricks, hallucinations come to mind. If you believe in ghosts then chances are you will think this was supernatural and that's ok if you want to believe that.
  4. by   Jensmom7
    When you work Hospice this is an everyday occurrence. Not creepy at all.

    As someone is transitioning, they frequently start seeing and talking to dead relatives and friends. It's usually comforting for the patient, so those aren't hallucinations we try to stop.

    We let family members know that this could, and most likely will, happen, because it can be a bit unnerving for them.
  5. by   HouTx
    I have been involved in waaaay too many strange and unusual patient-care events to rule out any possibility. It does make a great war story. And KUDOS for interjecting "monks cloak cyanosis" ... haven't heard that term in forever.
  6. by   AuDDoc
    People close to death, especially those with low O2 levels often times talk to dead relatives as another person said. Very common.

    I've also had patients ask who a certain person was in their room and when describe the person it sounds like someone describing death or Jesus. I've had some tell me some creepy stuff.
  7. by   AnnieOaklyRN
    Quote from AlphaM
    Nothing creepy about it, if I was dying I'd be calling my wife's name too, plus a brain that's deprived of oxygen will play all kinds of tricks, hallucinations come to mind. If you believe in ghosts then chances are you will think this was supernatural and that's ok if you want to believe that.
    I don't necessarily believe in the supernatural, but it is odd that he was yelling for his dead wife and putting his hand out towards the ceiling even though she has been dead for a while and he has a current living wife...

    Annie
  8. by   Jensmom7
    Quote from AnnieOaklyRN
    I don't necessarily believe in the supernatural, but it is odd that he was yelling for his dead wife and putting his hand out towards the ceiling even though she has been dead for a while and he has a current living wife...

    Annie
    Nope, happens a lot. I've had several patients see and talk to dead first spouses.
  9. by   blondy2061h
    Most people hold a special place in their heart for their first spouse, if they're widowed.

    I've never heard of "monk's cloak cyanosis." Going to go look that up.
  10. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from Jensmom7
    When you work Hospice this is an everyday occurrence. Not creepy at all.

    As someone is transitioning, they frequently start seeing and talking to dead relatives and friends. It's usually comforting for the patient, so those aren't hallucinations we try to stop.

    We let family members know that this could, and most likely will, happen, because it can be a bit unnerving for them.
    Are they hallucinations? Seems the hospice "protocol" discounts spirituality.
    I have attended many deaths, the patient sees an uncle, a spouse, a mother...that is there to help them cross over. I am not religious... I felt the presence of a loved one, there for the next step of the journey.
  11. by   Jensmom7
    Quote from Been there,done that
    Are they hallucinations? Seems the hospice "protocol" discounts spirituality.
    .
    Quite the contrary, one of the things we make note of is when our patients are transitioning and reaching out or staring at one spot on a wall or ceiling-we say they are "seeing Angels". It's usually a calm and peaceful time.

    Are they hallucinations? Who knows. None of us will until we are at that same point in our life journey. All I know is my patient is seeing them and and is comforted by them. Hallucination or visit from a dead relative-why would I want to make it go away??

    I've attended many deaths. I've held the hands of the dying and said the Lord's Prayer with them, bowed my head and stood respectfully while prayers were said by those of different faiths, comforted grieving family members, sat with people in their homes for hours until the funeral home arrived, laughed with them as they told all the family stories.

    I am a Christian, I respect everyone's choice, but I sense a bit of confrontation in your post. I will not engage in a pissing contest in a public forum-no ones opinion is ever changed, and everyone feels a bit raw afterwords.
  12. by   imintrouble
    My Dad died at home. He'd focus on areas of the room, and the hallway as if he were seeing things we weren't. One time he said he saw his mother. He wasn't confused at that time, though as he became sicker he was. It totally creeped me out when he'd look hard and frown at something I couldn't see.
  13. by   Kooky Korky
    My father said the name of his beloved aunt shortly before he passed. Did he see her? Don't know.

    As a Christian, I don't believe in being able to see or communicate with the dead while we are still living.
    But many people, including many Christians, do. Who am I to say?

    Don't be creeped out, though. It's all part of life.
  14. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from Jensmom7
    Quite the contrary, one of the things we make note of is when our patients are transitioning and reaching out or staring at one spot on a wall or ceiling-we say they are "seeing Angels". It's usually a calm and peaceful time.

    Are they hallucinations? Who knows. None of us will until we are at that same point in our life journey. All I know is my patient is seeing them and and is comforted by them. Hallucination or visit from a dead relative-why would I want to make it go away??

    I've attended many deaths. I've held the hands of the dying and said the Lord's Prayer with them, bowed my head and stood respectfully while prayers were said by those of different faiths, comforted grieving family members, sat with people in their homes for hours until the funeral home arrived, laughed with them as they told all the family stories.

    I am a Christian, I respect everyone's choice, but I sense a bit of confrontation in your post. I will not engage in a pissing contest in a public forum-no ones opinion is ever changed, and everyone feels a bit raw afterwords.
    Did not even think about a **** contest. Referring to the visions of the dying as "hallucinations".. would then make it all about the attending caregiver. Can't make the assumption , that they are hallucinating.
    You are viewing death as a "Christian "experience. How about the 4 billion people on this planet that are NOT Christian?

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