Is it worth Starting LPN vs. ADN Nursing Program - page 2

Hi I have a questions in regards to LPN programs in Georgia...I am currently seeking schools around my area...I really want to go for my RN but was wondering if it worth going for LPN to at least... Read More

  1. by   AgentBeast
    Depending on your situation you may want to look into doing an accelerated BSN (usually 3 or 4 semesters in length plus what ever pre-reqs you need).
  2. by   BigTuna
    If you have the drive, ambition, motivation, fortitude and smarts, go for the RN. You do yourself nothing but a disservice by selling yourself short with the LPN program. Furthermore, it will take you longer and cost you a lot more money (both in tuition and lost wages - because you could be working sooner as an RN) if you do two degrees. Why do that? The only reason to do the LPN program is if you are one of those people that need a lot of extra help, nurturing, coaxing and coddling along the way. If you have the desire, can set goals and do what it takes to attain them, the RN program is the right one, without question.

    And one more reason is that the RN is only the first step. You need a BSN and probably Masters to really go somewhere in nursing. If you add an LPN into that mix, it will take you even longer.
  3. by   lifelearningrn
    Quote from BigTuna
    The only reason to do the LPN program is if you are one of those people that need a lot of extra help, nurturing, coaxing and coddling along the way.
    Wow- all I can say is if I were an LVN/LPN I would find this comment highly offensive and disrespectful.
  4. by   magicnurse
    Depends on time, money and where you stand academically. I see nothing wrong with either although I have a preference for the ADN because of my goal of going further educational wise.
  5. by   anonymous1919
    Quote from BigTuna
    If you have the drive, ambition, motivation, fortitude and smarts, go for the RN. You do yourself nothing but a disservice by selling yourself short with the LPN program. Furthermore, it will take you longer and cost you a lot more money (both in tuition and lost wages - because you could be working sooner as an RN) if you do two degrees. Why do that? The only reason to do the LPN program is if you are one of those people that need a lot of extra help, nurturing, coaxing and coddling along the way. If you have the desire, can set goals and do what it takes to attain them, the RN program is the right one, without question.

    And one more reason is that the RN is only the first step. You need a BSN and probably Masters to really go somewhere in nursing. If you add an LPN into that mix, it will take you even longer.
    I didn't go through a LPN program because I need extra help, nurturing, coaxing and coddling. What is the he11 makes you think that LPN's need that?

    I went to LPN school because it cost me 9,000$ and I can work as a nurse in 1 year and make enough money to be able to support myself. I don't have parents or any other type of support to spend 2 years+ and 20k in RN school making barely livable wages as a CNA. Thanks.
  6. by   svdbyGrace0976
    I agree with you anonymous1919. That persons comment was very rude and disrespectful. I am an LPN and I did not need extra help. Don't judge without knowing a person first. Isn't that a rule in nursing!
  7. by   anonymous1919
    Quote from svdbyGrace0976
    I agree with you anonymous1919. That persons comment was very rude and disrespectful. I am an LPN and I did not need extra help. Don't judge without knowing a person first. Isn't that a rule in nursing!
    It really did hurt my feelings. That person obviously went to RN school so how do they even know what LPN school is like? Or what MY LPN school was like? I'm sure so and so told him this, this RN told him that, this LPN to RN told him this. Who cares, he didn't go to my school, he has no clue. I worked hard and had a very stressful time wondering if I was going to be able to keep a roof over my head while trying to study for weekly exams. I have set goals and am very proud of myself for making it through that year. I don't know who the he11 he thinks he is.
  8. by   lifelearningrn
    I think you should look at what your goals are long-term in your education and career. If earning an advanced degree is your end game, you may want to look into a second degree BSN or entry level MSN program.

    If your educational goal is a graduate degree, ADN would be a step back, BSN a step sideways and MSN a step forward from where you are right now. ALL three lead to an RN.. the difference being different levels of education and how many doors you want open for you on the career ladder.

    An LPN would be the most direct and economical route if your career goal is to work in DR offices and LTC, and you're happy with your current level of education.

    ADN would be the most economical route if you're looking to be a bedside RN, and again aren't interested in a higher degree for nursing.

    BSN & MSN are a more expensive route, but if your goal is higher degree.. going directly to one of these will probably be your quickest route to your goals. These degrees will also open doors to higher position and cast your net of possible career choices much further.

    None of these choices are bad.. everyone's goals and needs are different..

    Edited to Add:

    LPN (and ADN really) may also be a good way to get your foot in the door somewhere and possibly get tuition assistance to the higher degrees- this is a good option if you're not in a hurry to earn degrees and want to be at the bedside asap.
    Last edit by lifelearningrn on Oct 14, '10
  9. by   spete39
    MJMOON has some very valid points.
    I graduated May 2009 with a BS degree and I just finished an LPN program this month (currently studying for my NCLEX)....I chose this path because...1.) The LPN Program was FREE...2.) The Accelerated BSN Programs are WAAAAAY too expensive for me, I ran out of financial aid in my last semester so I know I wouldn't have been able to attend school without paying out of pocket....3.) I could work as an LPN and attend school to for my RN license....4.) By the time I graduated, I missed the deadlines for the RN schools in my area.
    But I think the LPN route is a good way to get you foot in the door, HOWEVER if you have the time and the money to complete an ABSN program, then I would suggest you go that route...and if you don't have the economic means for an ABSN you can focus on an ADN, because I think that ADN & BSN graduates make about the same amount of money, and you could always complete your BSN or MSN online while you're working as an RN.
  10. by   Kyliyah
    Quote from mjmoon
    I think you should look at what your goals are long-term in your education and career. If earning an advanced degree is your end game, you may want to look into a second degree BSN or entry level MSN program.

    If your educational goal is a graduate degree, ADN would be a step back, BSN a step sideways and MSN a step forward from where you are right now. ALL three lead to an RN.. the difference being different levels of education and how many doors you want open for you on the career ladder.

    An LPN would be the most direct and economical route if your career goal is to work in DR offices and LTC, and you're happy with your current level of education.

    ADN would be the most economical route if you're looking to be a bedside RN, and again aren't interested in a higher degree for nursing.

    BSN & MSN are a more expensive route, but if your goal is higher degree.. going directly to one of these will probably be your quickest route to your goals. These degrees will also open doors to higher position and cast your net of possible career choices much further.

    None of these choices are bad.. everyone's goals and needs are different..

    Edited to Add:

    LPN (and ADN really) may also be a good way to get your foot in the door somewhere and possibly get tuition assistance to the higher degrees- this is a good option if you're not in a hurry to earn degrees and want to be at the bedside asap.
    Thanks to all the feedback its really helping me out because i don't want to jump into anything and regret it either.
  11. by   MattiesMama
    Quote from BigTuna
    If you have the drive, ambition, motivation, fortitude and smarts, go for the RN. You do yourself nothing but a disservice by selling yourself short with the LPN program. Furthermore, it will take you longer and cost you a lot more money (both in tuition and lost wages - because you could be working sooner as an RN) if you do two degrees. Why do that? The only reason to do the LPN program is if you are one of those people that need a lot of extra help, nurturing, coaxing and coddling along the way. If you have the desire, can set goals and do what it takes to attain them, the RN program is the right one, without question.

    And one more reason is that the RN is only the first step. You need a BSN and probably Masters to really go somewhere in nursing. If you add an LPN into that mix, it will take you even longer.
    It never ceases to amaze how these LPN-slamming comments almost always come from first year nursing students It's like they teach a class on how to be a condescending know it all as part of the curriculum.
  12. by   iPink
    The decision is yours. I would do ADN or BSN. I'm not from Georgia, however I have a friend who teaches at GPC Nursing department. If you want to know opinions of Nursing Programs in Georgia. Try here: GA Nursing Programs Discussion - Nursing for Nurses
  13. by   MattiesMama
    OP-If you are able to get into an RN program and it's something you are able to commit to, I would go for that. But there are advantages and disadvantages to both approaches. Personally, I did my LPN first for a few reasons...first because my state has very few RN programs and all of them had long waiting lists, and were lottery-based. As a single mom I needed to do something that would get me into the field and earning money as soon as possible-the LPN program had openings every 3 months (as opposed to once a year) and only took 15 months to complete. It also opened up the option of doing the Excelsior bridge program, which allows me to work full time while working towards my RN. And having LPN experience will give me a leg up when it comes to applying for a job as an RN. Yes, the job opportunities can be more limited, although this depends on your state and your nurse practice act-some states are stricter than others concerning what an LPN can and cannot do. Unfortunately the way the job market is right now, opportunities are limited to new-grad RN's as well.

    There is no "right" or "wrong" way to become a nurse-so hold your head high and be proud no matter what path you choose.

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