For Sale: Used Nurse. Dirt Cheap! - page 7

I'm not sure if it's because I was a good deal older than many of my classmates when I graduated from nursing school and found out very quickly that I was nowhere near as smart as I thought I was, or... Read More

  1. by   VivaLasViejas
    Well, it's pretty spendy up here in OR and WA too, and our economies certainly aren't great, but I wouldn't blame you for getting out of CA.

    My family and I moved up here from the San Diego area in 1988 for the same reason---too crowded, too expensive, and the economy was in the toilet then too. Guess some things never change! I miss it sometimes, especially the weather, but I've never regretted the move; Oregon gave us more opportunities and we've done very well here. And it's STILL cheaper to live here than in So.Cal.
  2. by   MaritesaRN
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    Well, it's pretty spendy up here in OR and WA too, and our economies certainly aren't great, but I wouldn't blame you for getting out of CA.

    My family and I moved up here from the San Diego area in 1988 for the same reason---too crowded, too expensive, and the economy was in the toilet then too. Guess some things never change! I miss it sometimes, especially the weather, but I've never regretted the move; Oregon gave us more opportunities and we've done very well here. And it's STILL cheaper to live here than in So.Cal.
    :wink2:
    Viva, I really appreciate your honesty. I need an ear or ears about Oregon and Washington, while I get myself sort of ready w/ the license and some serious certifications. Maybe I could get my feet wet a bit by working part time w/ an LTC close to me in Playa del Rey.....Can you be my eyes and ears? I did not know that you are in Oregon! My daughter moved to Oregon with a musician couple (Oregon is very good music state) , but after a month I have to tell her to come home because I was starting to support two households ( the musicians do not make much money) and It was getting difficult, you know.......they were so heart broken , they love it there so much. I have heard that people were different too. It is good to know that Oregon have a diverse culture---- I prefer grown up places like this. San Diego is beautiful , but I do see that it is also getting very crowded.
    I like to go to a place where children can still be children , fresh air, water, lots of water !!!!! and most of all a good public school for my grandaughter. I will be working for a while, so this move will be good...but like I said before , if I can get a Medicare UR/Medical review job , I will be happy. but if I need or want to change direction, that too is open. Thank you Viva! You are indeed an Angel and a terrific writer. can you direct me to your blog too?
  3. by   VivaLasViejas
    Yes, I'd have to say people are more laid-back here...........we tend to be a "maverick" state, in fact our state motto was "Oregon: Things look different here" for years!

    Western Oregon and Eastern Oregon are two different critters, however. On the west side, where I live, it's mostly very progressive, liberal, and "green" (too much so, IMO). Portland, Eugene, and Corvallis are college towns where there is more diversity in the population and great educational opportunities. It also rains a lot here, but it's beautiful year-round and the summers are perfection itself. (Except this year---we are having a record-breaking heat wave, yesterday it was almost 110!!) Eastern OR is a lot of high desert, much less rain but more extreme temperatures on both ends. It's mostly agricultural, and the people are generally more conservative politically. There are good-sized hospitals in LaGrande, Pendleton, and Hermiston, but otherwise employment opportunities aren't the greatest.

    Washington, I don't know that much about, except Seattle has several large hospitals and who-knows how many LTCs, but Tacoma, Olympia, and Everett are also good-sized cities with a smaller-city feel that you might like as well.

    Once again, I wish you all the luck in the world!
  4. by   MaritesaRN
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    Yes, I'd have to say people are more laid-back here...........we tend to be a "maverick" state, in fact our state motto was "Oregon: Things look different here" for years!

    Western Oregon and Eastern Oregon are two different critters, however. On the west side, where I live, it's mostly very progressive, liberal, and "green" (too much so, IMO). Portland, Eugene, and Corvallis are college towns where there is more diversity in the population and great educational opportunities. It also rains a lot here, but it's beautiful year-round and the summers are perfection itself. (Except this year---we are having a record-breaking heat wave, yesterday it was almost 110!!) Eastern OR is a lot of high desert, much less rain but more extreme temperatures on both ends. It's mostly agricultural, and the people are generally more conservative politically. There are good-sized hospitals in LaGrande, Pendleton, and Hermiston, but otherwise employment opportunities aren't the greatest.

    Washington, I don't know that much about, except Seattle has several large hospitals and who-knows how many LTCs, but Tacoma, Olympia, and Everett are also good-sized cities with a smaller-city feel that you might like as well.
    Once again, I wish you all the luck in the world!

    Thank you Viva ! this is a start! I have heard that most nurses have both Oregon and Washington nurse license, if that is true , why is that? Is the geographic location that close to each other? I have a head hunter that will also help me----there was a real good UR position in Oregon , and the employer liked my qualificication in this area....but they want an Oregon license upon application . I am putting this as one of my priority list. we will be leaving some close friends and relatives, but honestly I just find Los Angeles crowded , hot, dry and dirty, and very expensive. The inflation is growing faster than my salary raise !! thank you for the information. I would like to keep in touch w/ you if you like? :wink2::heartbeat
  5. by   FranEMTnurse
    I love your style of writing, Viva. You are a natural writer.
  6. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from maritesa
    Thank you Viva ! this is a start! I have heard that most nurses have both Oregon and Washington nurse license, if that is true , why is that? Is the geographic location that close to each other? I have a head hunter that will also help me----there was a real good UR position in Oregon , and the employer liked my qualificication in this area....but they want an Oregon license upon application . I am putting this as one of my priority list. we will be leaving some close friends and relatives, but honestly I just find Los Angeles crowded , hot, dry and dirty, and very expensive. The inflation is growing faster than my salary raise !! thank you for the information. I would like to keep in touch w/ you if you like? :wink2::heartbeat
    Yes, there are a lot of Oregon nurses in the Portland/Vancouver area who hold dual licenses because they travel back and forth between states. I don't think that's true of the majority of OR nurses, though. For a while I was working for a company that wanted me to oversee several assisted living facilities between here and Olympia, so if I'd stayed with them I'd have had to get a WA license, not to mention learn an entire new set of regulations (there are a number of differences between the two states as far as nurse delegation goes).

    For you, however, I think it would be a good idea since you've not settled on one place yet.
  7. by   RyanSofie
    I am an "older" RN and discovered that the managers I have envied are not as satisfied with their positions as I imagined. The 60 or more hour work week that has little to do with patients and more with "production" leaves them with little "patience" and less compassion. I have met a few "older" nurses who spent their careers chasing the pot at the end of the rainbow who are certifiable and nutty as fruitcakes. I accepted a position as a "school nurse" this past September and was quickly measured up as "too old", not "pretty enough" to run around an elementary school all day with kids. Well I stood my ground and although the pay is lousy I would not trade it for any top of the mountain position. When I go to meet my maker I want to be able to say I loved what I did in my life and I made a positive contribution to my patients...that I improved their lives and that I honestly cared about them as human beings and not just numbers.
  8. by   nursemarion
    Quote from RyanSofie
    I am an "older" RN and discovered that the managers I have envied are not as satisfied with their positions as I imagined. The 60 or more hour work week that has little to do with patients and more with "production" leaves them with little "patience" and less compassion. I have met a few "older" nurses who spent their careers chasing the pot at the end of the rainbow who are certifiable and nutty as fruitcakes. I accepted a position as a "school nurse" this past September and was quickly measured up as "too old", not "pretty enough" to run around an elementary school all day with kids. Well I stood my ground and although the pay is lousy I would not trade it for any top of the mountain position. When I go to meet my maker I want to be able to say I loved what I did in my life and I made a positive contribution to my patients...that I improved their lives and that I honestly cared about them as human beings and not just numbers.
    I too am an older nurse who has recently entered school nursing. I love the kids, wish I could just spend my day with them, but I find that the pecking order and social drama of a school is much worse than the hospitals ever were. And I have no one to relate to. It is truly like being back in high school. The teachers are just like the little cliques we had back then. They never grew up. And you wonder why kids are the way they are.

    I am lonely and miserable and surrounded by overpaid pompous teachers who treat me like a secretary, and administrators who want to make decisions about issues that they are not qualified to make. I am not allowed to think or act on my own. I never expected it to be like this. Nurses are taught early on to think and act independently. Now I get in trouble if I don't go to the administration about everything.

    Whoever said that school nursing was a low-stress job was lying. My stress was lower when I worked as a manager.
  9. by   MaritesaRN
    Lots of kudos for Ryan sofie. You might be older but a lot of knowledge from life and experience.
  10. by   RyanSofie
    Quote from cxg174
    I too am an older nurse who has recently entered school nursing. I love the kids, wish I could just spend my day with them, but I find that the pecking order and social drama of a school is much worse than the hospitals ever were. And I have no one to relate to. It is truly like being back in high school. The teachers are just like the little cliques we had back then. They never grew up. And you wonder why kids are the way they are.

    I am lonely and miserable and surrounded by overpaid pompous teachers who treat me like a secretary, and administrators who want to make decisions about issues that they are not qualified to make. I am not allowed to think or act on my own. I never expected it to be like this. Nurses are taught early on to think and act independently. Now I get in trouble if I don't go to the administration about everything.

    Whoever said that school nursing was a low-stress job was lying. My stress was lower when I worked as a manager.
    School Nursing is no where near a "low stress" job. I agree it is alot like being back in high school with the teachers and their cliques. I was put through the gaunlet when I started the position. No one spoke to me...no one and that included the school prinicipal who stood at the door every morning greeting the children with her hoarse barking voice "get your hat off" and other very loud screeching directives. I was then called in and informed that I was "unapproachable". Huh? I said " good morning" to Ms. Principal every morning to only be snubbed. The last straw with me was when a "lunch-lady" was said to have "reported" I was "eating a childs lunch"...the child in question was on a therapeutic diet and I had been instructed by the child's parent to "remove" foods that the school served him that was not allowed and that would result in illness to the child...and no I did NOT consume the childs lunch.. I was LIVID when I was called in again about this "report". The parents of this child decided to defend this nurse however and they fought the school administrators because I had had enough and was resigning. The child in question had 12 infections the previous school year due to incompetent care...he had none since I began working at the school. The "lunch-ladies" faced a very irate parent and were told "you are to listen to this nurse and she has our permission to care for our child", "if you have any questions you are to contact us". I had teachers report they felt I could not keep up with the kids...I was "too old"...I took "one step at a time down the stairs", It was unbelievable the litany of accusations I was subjected to. In the end I stood my ground. I informed the prinicipal that I would go to the labor board and file a discrimination complaint for unfair labor practices. The litany ceased. I will continue to the end of the school year because I am commited to doing my upmost for the children. I have learned alot with this experience to say the least. Just one more complaint I want to add...the H1N1 situation at the start of the year required teaching the use of hand sanitizer and hand washing...this principal actually said to me "your a germ aphobe"..
  11. by   nursemarion
    OMG we live in a parallel universe!
  12. by   diane227
    The same thing happened to me. I was on the fast track from my first day out of nursing school in 1978. I stayed at the hospital where I worked as a student and my first job was as the charge nurse of a 42 bed post op CV floor. From there to the ICU and then to my dream job in a large county trauma center. I worked my way up the ladder there to the director position with 5 departments and an $11 million dollar budget. I loved it. I was always getting offers to be recruited away. I did leave and took two other director positions but I started getting very burned out. I finally decided to leave management and go into an area where I never thought I would work... psychiatry. And it was wonderful. Learning new things and being able to really help people. I have finally moved back to med surg as the 3-11 charge nurse. It gives me a little bit of management and some patient care. I work with great people and when I clock out I don't have to worry about the phone ringing calling me to come back for some type of emergency. I have respect for all nurses, no matter where they work. We all have problems and challenges unique to our area where we work. And we are all working harder than ever. Old backs, old knees, ever stronger reading glasses each year and getting to the age where you are older than the doctors and now you scare THEM. I love my job!!!!!!
  13. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from RyanSofie
    School Nursing is no where near a "low stress" job. I agree it is alot like being back in high school with the teachers and their cliques. I was put through the gaunlet when I started the position. No one spoke to me...no one and that included the school prinicipal who stood at the door every morning greeting the children with her hoarse barking voice "get your hat off" and other very loud screeching directives. I was then called in and informed that I was "unapproachable". Huh? I said " good morning" to Ms. Principal every morning to only be snubbed. The last straw with me was when a "lunch-lady" was said to have "reported" I was "eating a childs lunch"...the child in question was on a therapeutic diet and I had been instructed by the child's parent to "remove" foods that the school served him that was not allowed and that would result in illness to the child...and no I did NOT consume the childs lunch.. I was LIVID when I was called in again about this "report". The parents of this child decided to defend this nurse however and they fought the school administrators because I had had enough and was resigning. The child in question had 12 infections the previous school year due to incompetent care...he had none since I began working at the school. The "lunch-ladies" faced a very irate parent and were told "you are to listen to this nurse and she has our permission to care for our child", "if you have any questions you are to contact us". I had teachers report they felt I could not keep up with the kids...I was "too old"...I took "one step at a time down the stairs", It was unbelievable the litany of accusations I was subjected to. In the end I stood my ground. I informed the prinicipal that I would go to the labor board and file a discrimination complaint for unfair labor practices. The litany ceased. I will continue to the end of the school year because I am commited to doing my upmost for the children. I have learned alot with this experience to say the least. Just one more complaint I want to add...the H1N1 situation at the start of the year required teaching the use of hand sanitizer and hand washing...this principal actually said to me "your a germ aphobe"..
    Well, I guess there's no fool like an EDUCATED fool. Sheesh!

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