Advice for new grad?

  1. I just pass my NCLEX Rn and and recently started looking for specialty. I'm confuse between the icu, ed as both are great but which one is going to give me more experience for when I go do disaster relief. Any suggestions and comments much appreciated.
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  2. Visit ray-man profile page

    About ray-man, BSN

    Joined: Sep '16; Posts: 9; Likes: 4
    from PR

    10 Comments

  3. by   Newgradnurse17
    Don't expect to get into ed or icu. Chances are you won't. No job is perfect. More importantly find a job which is supportive and you can tolerate. For example my hospital has seperate floor for medical and surgical. I can't stand medical, it makes hate nursing. Whereas surgical isn't my dream job but I still find it enjoyable most days. Make sure you don't go some where you know you will hate, because it's going to be a long year because you can realistically change jobs.

    My advice is email hospitals with your cv and a personalise cover letter to hospitals your keen on, expressing your interest. Doesn't matter if they looking for nurses or not. I emailed 16 hospitals and 15 of them offered me an interview within 6 weeks. However got my job on the first interview.
  4. by   Triddin
    I think pacu and or are some of the best specialties for disaster relief. A colleague was an ER/ Pacu Rn and he said hasn't done much as a trauma/ Er nurse because by the time he was deployed and situated, the majority of patients had been rescued and were going into and coming out of surgery
  5. by   Been there,done that
    Congratulations. Have you been offered any positions?

    Your question is an example of applying critical thinking skills. Would the people you are trying to serve, need emergency care... or care after being (somewhat) stabilized?

    Best wishes, let us know how it's going.
  6. by   ray-man
    Thanks I didn't thought of that part of the relief time response.
  7. by   ray-man
    If it's by how I think, it's in a way both. As the ones that are already rescued need the post care more, but also the ones that didn't get rescued will go to get emergency care. I see that post care can be more needed for when the disaster passes.
    Thanks "Been there, done that" and "triddin" and"newgradnurse17" I have not yet receive any offers yet. I'm in Florida so the hut for the specialty for me has just began.
  8. by   ConquerNursing
    Quote from Newgradnurse17
    Don't expect to get into ed or icu. Chances are you won't. No job is perfect. More importantly find a job which is supportive and you can tolerate. For example my hospital has seperate floor for medical and surgical. I can't stand medical, it makes hate nursing. Whereas surgical isn't my dream job but I still find it enjoyable most days. Make sure you don't go some where you know you will hate, because it's going to be a long year because you can realistically change jobs.

    My advice is email hospitals with your cv and a personalise cover letter to hospitals your keen on, expressing your interest. Doesn't matter if they looking for nurses or not. I emailed 16 hospitals and 15 of them offered me an interview within 6 weeks. However got my job on the first interview.
    I feel that this is typical myth that many Graduate Nurses experience. I am a new graduate and I was told the same thing during my time in nursing school. Something that I feel makes an impact on the ability for a new grad to land a job in a acute/critical area depends on networking and showcase of desire to work in these areas. Many hospitals are adopting a more holistic approach to hiring, which is showing an increase in HCAHP scores. Therefore, personality plays a major role. The hospital that I worked for during nursing school is a firm believer in being able to train the right person to do any nursing task, as long as they possess something unique that they know will carry over to the patient experience. And the hospital I work for has a A+ nationwide ratings! So, if you feel that you have the skill and desire, be CONFIDENT and go for it!
  9. by   Neats
    I think asking people for advice is great but when it comes to your own career pathway I really feel you should let your own internal alarms guide you...it sounds like you have really thought about your pathway...where do you see yourself in 5 years...pick the best avenue and go for it.
  10. by   Cowboyardee
    Quote from ConquerNursing
    I feel that this is typical myth that many Graduate Nurses experience. I am a new graduate and I was told the same thing during my time in nursing school. Something that I feel makes an impact on the ability for a new grad to land a job in a acute/critical area depends on networking and showcase of desire to work in these areas. Many hospitals are adopting a more holistic approach to hiring, which is showing an increase in HCAHP scores. Therefore, personality plays a major role. The hospital that I worked for during nursing school is a firm believer in being able to train the right person to do any nursing task, as long as they possess something unique that they know will carry over to the patient experience. And the hospital I work for has a A+ nationwide ratings! So, if you feel that you have the skill and desire, be CONFIDENT and go for it!
    Uh huh. I think that "special something" is most often a willingness to work at the bottom of the pay scale and sign oneself into indentured servitude (I.e. clauses necessitating paying for the cost of training if an employee doesn't stay the full ___ months) as part of the hiring contract.

    Your point about not giving up on applying to ED and ICU jobs right out of school is fair enough though. It all depends on the local job market.
  11. by   ray-man
    Quote from Cowboyardee
    Uh huh. I think that "special something" is most often a willingness to work at the bottom of the pay scale and sign oneself into indentured servitude (I.e. clauses necessitating paying for the cost of training if an employee doesn't stay the full ___ months) as part of the hiring contract.

    Your point about not giving up on applying to ED and ICU jobs right out of school is fair enough though. It all depends on the local job market.
    Thanks...the local market, the need is growing and the local hospitals are posting adds for positions. I found a hospital that is level 1 trauma so going to call them to schedule and interview. If they have a good ER they must have a better ICU. Win win I think.
  12. by   ConquerNursing
    Quote from Cowboyardee
    Uh huh. I think that "special something" is most often a willingness to work at the bottom of the pay scale and sign oneself into indentured servitude (I.e. clauses necessitating paying for the cost of training if an employee doesn't stay the full ___ months) as part of the hiring contract.

    Your point about not giving up on applying to ED and ICU jobs right out of school is fair enough though. It all depends on the local job market.

    I know what you mean. And you are absolutely correct about the willingness to work at the bottom of the pay scale. Where I am located it seems to be that most hospitals pay the same starting rate for graduate nurses. However, if you participate in a residency program you make crap wages until you matriculate during your first year. Nursing school was intense and required so many sacrifices and I feel that being paid $13-15/hr during your time as a new grad nurse in a resident program is disrespectful. And then not being able to leave for 2 years without being charged! However, you learn so much. So there is balancing act. We all have worked so hard to get through our nursing programs, so don't settle with anything that will leave you unhappy. J

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